Author Topic: The Divine Code Daily Dose  (Read 31055 times)

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Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #450 on: December 05, 2019, 07:59:24 PM »
However, if a Gentile observes any of the Jewish commandments from the Torah as a religious obligation (even if he does so from a desire to receive a spiritual reward), this is forbidden based on the prohibition of adding a commandment, and there is no spiritual reward to be derived from this.64

64 Rabbi Moshe Feinstein, Igrot Moshe Yoreh De'ah vol. 2, ch.7 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 61).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #451 on: December 08, 2019, 09:48:33 PM »
Gentiles are especially forbidden to perform commandments that require the holiness of a Jew, such as writing a scroll of the Torah or a mezuzah or phylacteries (tefillin in Hebrew).

The general rule is that any Jewish mitzvah between man and man, or between man and G-d, which has a reason and a logical benefit for a person or society, is permitted for Gentiles to perform. But this does not apply for any commandment that does not have a logical, natural benefit, but instead is a sign for the Jews (e.g., wearing ritual fringes [tzitzit] or phylacteries, or affixing a mezuzah on a doorpost),65 or is a Godly statute for Jews without reason or benefit understood to a person.

65 Radvaz on Hilhot Melahim, ch. 10 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 61-62).
« Last Edit: December 11, 2019, 11:34:46 AM by Hrvatski Noahid »

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #452 on: December 12, 2019, 12:59:52 AM »
See Rambam, Laws of Tzitzit 3:9 and Shulhan Aruh Orah Hayim ch. 20, that it is forbidden for a Jew to give or sell a Gentile tzitzit, so the ritual garment will not come to be used by a Gentile for the purpose of disguising himself as a Jew. Rema writes in Yoreh De'ah ch. 291, in the name of Maharil, that a Jew should not give a mezuzah scroll to a Gentile for the same reason. It appears that beyond this, there is a general reason that Gentiles should not be compared completely to Jews. Therefore, they should not perform uniquely commanded Jewish signs, such as those (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 61).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #453 on: December 15, 2019, 03:20:16 AM »
See the Ginat Veradim Orah Hayim Rule 2, ch. 28, which explains that Rebbi (Rabbi Yehudah the Prince) gave a mezuzah scroll to Artavon (a Roman Gentile) only to own, but not to be affixed to his door, for a Gentile has no purpose for this at all. A Gentile should be prevented from performing such commandments and should be taught that it is improper for him to observe them (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 62).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #454 on: December 18, 2019, 10:23:21 AM »
It is not problematic that male Gentiles are allowed to have themselves circumcised as a spiritual observance (although it is meant to be a sign in the flesh of a Jew), since many Gentiles are circumcised for medical purposes, and not to add a commandment or a new religion. Thus, a male Gentile who wishes to be circumcised in order to refine his personality and his body and its desires may do so. But if he is not descended from Keturah, he should not do so as a commandment (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 62).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #455 on: December 22, 2019, 11:46:51 AM »
See Likkutei Sihot vol. 10, p. 139. Rabbeinu Bahyai writes (on Gen. 17:13) that circumcision is comparable to offering a desirable sacrifice from one's body to G-d, and it can also accomplish a weakening of one's carnal desires (Guide for the Perplexed, Part III, ch. 49). These reasons are upright for every man for the purpose of controlling his nature, and likewise as a sacrificial offering, which righteous Gentiles are permitted to do. Therefore, if a Gentile wishes to have a circumcision for these reasons, and not as an obligation of observing a commandment, this is praiseworthy (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 62).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #456 on: December 26, 2019, 06:28:10 PM »
A Gentile may perform a Jewish commandment for a practical benefit, even if it is only indirectly - such as tithing for charity, which benefits society by supporting the poor and is a logical necessity; or returning a lost object, which helps to establish camaraderie; or sending away a mother bird before taking its young, which is having pity on animals. Since these actions have a benefit for him personally or for his society, they have practical justification, and he receives reward for performing them - both the practical benefit, and a reward from Heaven for doing a correct and good deed (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 62).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #457 on: December 30, 2019, 02:31:43 PM »
However, a Jewish commandment that has no physical effect on a person or society (such as tzitzit) accomplishes nothing for a Gentile. It follows that a Gentile would do this only because he desires to do a Godly commandment that he was not commanded, and thus he is adding a religion. He therefore receives no reward for this, and on the contrary, he would be committing a transgression that carries liability to punishment by the Hand of Heaven (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 62).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #458 on: January 04, 2020, 02:35:50 AM »
The abovementioned rule applies only to Jewish commandments that are not duty-bound by logic (even if they have a logical reason) such as circumcision or tithes. However, those that are duty-bound by logic, such as honoring one's parents, and kindness and charity, are obligated to be kept, because such is the correct way for a person to act, as befitting the image of G-d in which he was created. However, a Gentile may not keep them because it is a commandment from G-d, but rather because one is obligated to be a good, moral person (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 62-63).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #459 on: January 08, 2020, 04:32:19 AM »
See Likkutei Sihot vol. 5, p. 154; it is possible that honoring parents is an intellectual obligation on a Gentile just like charity, which is necessary for the establishment of a proper society and proper laws (dinim). However, it is obvious that a Gentile is forbidden to embarrass his parents, since it is against logical human respect, as we can see from the story of Ham (Genesis 9:22), who disgraced his father Noah. See Pirkei Rebbe Eliezer ch. 23 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 63).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #460 on: January 10, 2020, 03:16:22 PM »
See Rokei'ah 366, that also seems to say Gentiles are obligated to escort guests when they leave (referring to inviting guests also) as it is a logical obligation. One's charitable donations should not go to fund activities that support idolatry, or drawing Jews or Gentiles away from faith in the Torah of Moses (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 63).

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #461 on: January 14, 2020, 03:09:09 PM »
Many prohibitions that are commanded upon Jews are obligations for Gentiles to observe based on logic, such as the prohibitions against hating others, taking revenge or bearing a grudge. A Gentile should observe these prohibitions out of human decency, and not as Divine commandments of their own. This duty is an absolute obligation upon Gentiles, and they are liable to be punished for transgressing these obligations and for acting against moral and logical practices as the Generation of the Flood was punished in the days of Noah.69

69 According to Ramban on Genesis 6:2 and 6:13, and Hiskuni there, 7:21 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 63).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #462 on: January 16, 2020, 09:00:55 PM »
Gentiles are obligated to give charity, and whether as an individual or a community, they are obligated to be concerned about help for the poor and needy, to help them appropriately in any way possible. Sodom and Gomorrah were destroyed only on account of their refusal to uphold and help the destitute, and their outlawing of any charity or help for the poor; for this, G-d judged them to deserve annihilation.70

70 Genesis ch. 19; Tractate Sanhedrin 104b; Likkutei Sihot vol. 5, p. 155 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 63).

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #463 on: January 21, 2020, 06:53:09 PM »
Gentiles are permitted to add any prohibitions in order to guard themselves against transgression, or to establish a correct and orderly society. This is desirous as a part of observing the obligations of the Noahide commandment to establish courts of law and develop proper societies in the world. Examples are societal restrictions against harassing women and children, and punishments set for transgressing such laws.71 The prohibition of adding a religion or a commandment does not apply to this, because it is part of keeping the Noahide obligations of establishing courts and laws, and proper societies in the world.

71 Rashi on Genesis 34:7. See Likkutei Sihot vol. 5, p. 190 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 63-64).