Author Topic: The Divine Code Daily Dose  (Read 3266 times)

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #25 on: May 25, 2018, 08:07:14 PM »
What about sea lions? They can walk out of the water and seem like dogs. I saw one in an aquarium and seemed like a dog when it was out of the water.

https://knowledgenuts.com/2013/08/15/dogs-and-bears-are-closely-related-to-seals

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zRGBP48YMfM

Mammals that dwell both in the sea and on the land are considered as wild land mammals and are included in this prohibition (e.g. seals, sea otters and sea lions).

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #26 on: May 25, 2018, 08:25:29 PM »
Likewise, regarding stores that provide plastic or paper bags at the check-out line for their customers' purchases: if in the eyes of the society, one such bag is not considered to have any monetary value, then the owner would surely not be concerned if just one bag were taken without permission. Nevertheless, it is forbidden to take even one shopping bag without the permission of the owner, for if many people would come along and each one would take one bag without making any purchase, the owner would suffer monetary loss, and this certainly matters to him.

It is not sufficient to ask permission from a store employee who is not authorized to decide on behalf of the owner. If one does not get proper permission to take a bag, he can avoid theft by making a small purchase.

This is not comparable to the case of pulling off slivers of wood, since it is unlikely that more than one person would come and take slivers, and therefore the owner does not mind. But it is a usual occurrence for almost all of the customers to take a bag from the store for their purchases, causing an expense to the merchant, and surely the merchant would mind when people who are not buying merchandise from the store take the store's bags (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 569-570).

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #27 on: May 26, 2018, 12:53:41 PM »
A person should always honor G-d's Name, in any language. When one does mention His Name, one should think about the reason and purpose for mentioning it, in order that it not be mentioned in vain (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 271).

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #28 on: May 27, 2018, 02:46:08 PM »
Likewise, a country whose sins outnumber its merits is liable to be destroyed immediately, like Sodom about which it says, "And G-d said, "Because the outcry of Sodom and Gomorrah has become very great, and because their sin has been very grave, I will descend and see: if they act in accordance with its outcry which has come to Me."

Likewise for the entire world: if their sins outnumbered their merits, they would be wiped out, as it says about the generation of the flood, "G-d saw that the wickedness of mankind was great upon the earth ... and G-d reconsidered having made mankind on earth ... and G-d said, "I will blot out mankind" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 127-128).

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #29 on: May 29, 2018, 11:34:41 AM »
Every person* whose heart desires, and who has the motivation and understanding to separate himself to stand before G-d, to serve Him and to gain knowledge about Him, and who goes in the correct path that G-d made for him, and who removes from upon himself the many calculations which people strive after, has become sanctified as "holy of holies." G-d will be this person's portion and inheritance forever, and he will merit to have his necessities met in this world, as did the Priests who served in the Holy Temple.

This comparison is made above in topic 5:6, which explain that a pious Gentile who involves himself in learning Torah in the area of the Noahide Commandments is compared to a High Priest who serves in the Holy Temple.

Thus said David, may he rest in peace: "G-d is the portion of my inheritance and of my cup; You maintain my lot."

*See Likkutei Sihot vol. 13, p. 230, that this term "ish va'ish" refers equally to Gentiles as well as Jews (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 128).

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #30 on: May 30, 2018, 05:46:49 PM »
Thus we speak of four dimensions of traditional meaning in the Torah: the simple meaning of the text, the allusions, the hermeneutical interpretations, and the mystical meanings. These four levels are summarized in the Hebrew acronym PaRDe"S (literally "orchard" or "garden") in context of the Talmudic passage in Tractate Hagigah 14b of the "four who entered the Pardes" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 42).

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #31 on: May 31, 2018, 01:07:45 PM »
It is forbidden for a person to ponder in his heart on concepts of idol worship, or to research idolatrous concepts in an attempt to discover if they are true or not (since they are certainly false). These are included in the Torah's prohibition, "Do not turn to the idols ..." (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 148).

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #32 on: June 01, 2018, 09:04:49 PM »
What is the definition of "swearing in vain"? This is one of the following four types of vows:

(a) One who swears about a known thing, in which there exists no doubt to its truth, like one who swears that a stone is a stone. Included in this category are those who hurry to swear when there is no true need for an oath;

(b) One who swears about a matter which all know is false, like swearing that a man is a woman, or a stone is gold, which is not only false, but needs no verification.

(c) One who swears to do something which he has no power to accomplish, like swearing not to sleep for three consecutive days and nights, or not to eat for seven days (or not to sleep or eat without giving a timeframe for his vow, which implies that the vow exists forever), utters a vow in vain, since he will surely not be able to keep it.

One need not pain himself and deprive himself of sleep for one or two days until he goes against his vow, and likewise for deprivation of food; rather it is permitted for him to eat and sleep right away, for since his vow is in vain, his words are of no consequence.

(d) One who swears about a prohibition he is commanded in (for example, swearing that he will eat flesh taken from a living animal, or steal, or commit adultery), has uttered a vain oath, since it is forbidden for him to keep his words, and he has no need to make such a vow (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 280-281).

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #33 on: June 04, 2018, 01:02:40 AM »
A woman may only be married to one man at a time, and if she becomes "married" to two men, she is considered married only to the first one she had relations with for the purpose of marriage, and she and the second man are liable for the capital sin of adultery. It is related in Torah sources that G-d considers a marriage ceremony itself of one woman wedding an additional man to be repulsive (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 518).

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #34 on: June 06, 2018, 03:27:00 AM »
This is opposite to the visiting and praying which takes place at the "Western Wall" in Jerusalem, for there is no Torah Law or Rabbinical obligation to congregate there or at the site of any other monument. The Torah obligation is for Jews to gather in the Holy Temple on the three Jewish pilgrimage festivals, if it is built and functioning on its established site, as they are commanded in (a) Deut. 16:16, "Three times a year all your males should appear before the L-rd, your G-d, in the place that He will choose ..." (cf. Exodus 23:14-19), and (b) Deut. 31:10-13, "At the end of seven years ... during the Succot festival when all Israel comes to appear before the L-rd, your G-d, in the place that He will choose, ... gather together (all) the people ... and their children ..."

Making a requirement for a specific place to worship, other than the Divinely sanctified Holy Temple when it is functioning, is an example of an innovated commandment. Also, one who relegates the Temple Mount to a status of secondary holiness in the world is accepting an innovated doctrine. This is one of the aspects of a forbidden pillar: designating a specific place as sanctified for obligatory congregating, other than the Holy Temple in Jerusalem. In contrast, the Holy Temple in Jerusalem is G-d's chosen place for the revelation of His Divine Presence, as stated (Psalms 132:13-14): "For the L-rd has chosen Zion; He desired it for His dwelling place. This is My resting place forever, here I will dwell, for I have desired it." (See Rambam, Laws of the Chosen House 1:3.) Therefore, if one claims that there is some place with a more exalted presence of Divinity than at the site of the Holy Temple, that has the connotation of some other divinity which is not the One  G-d of Israel, Who is the Source of the eternal Hebrew Scriptures.

The "Western Wall" is a remnant of the rampart around the Holy Temple, which was built in fulfillment of G-d's command in Ex. 25:8: "They shall make Me a Sanctuary ..." Therefore, both from the aspect of people visiting the site to pray there (including Gentiles; see Kings I, 8:41-2), and the structure itself, it is the opposite of the pillar that is forbidden by the Torah (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 196).

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #35 on: June 07, 2018, 02:18:09 AM »
Both men and women are equally obligated to keep these commandments, and receive punishment from a Torah-based court if they are convicted of transgressing them (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 75).

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #36 on: June 08, 2018, 05:59:44 AM »
In the prohibition against eating meat from a living animal, rodents in general cannot be assumed to be included among the eight sheretz creatures that are listed in Leviticus. Rodents in general must, therefore, be considered as wild mammals and not as sheretz animals, since we find that some rodents, such as squirrels, porcupines, etc., are considered wild mammals. Because of this doubt as to the identities of the named sheretz creatures in Lev. 11:29-30, no rodents other than the house mouse, which is definitely a sheretz, can be considered exempt from the prohibition of eiver min ha'hai.

Bats are considered to be in the same category as birds (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 302-303).

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #37 on: June 10, 2018, 04:00:03 AM »
Similarly, it is permissible to publicize the character of an evil person and his evil deeds, so that other people will be warned about him and will take care not be harmed by him, since the intention is to save others from harm (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 456).

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #38 on: June 11, 2018, 06:24:52 AM »
In this context see Kuzary III:28-38 for Rabbi Judah Halevi's refutations of the Karaites, a sect which (like the Sadducees before them) claims to recognize the "Written Torah" only. He points out the inconsistencies and self-contradictions of their position, the unavoidable dependency on tradition (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 40). 

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #39 on: June 12, 2018, 08:17:44 AM »
There is a fundamental difference between a person's liability to punishment in a court of law, and his power to cleanse his soul from liability in the eyes of G-d. As with any sin, the sin of a Gentile thief in the judgment of G-d can be removed by proper repentance, but only if the stolen object is returned, or if its value is paid back when returning it intact is not possible (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 565).

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #40 on: June 13, 2018, 07:48:11 AM »
See Shulhan Aruh Ha'Rav, Laws of Torah Study ch. 2, in Kuntres Aharon 1, that Rambam wrote Mishneh Torah as a practical Torah-law guide, and his opinion is that from learning his Mishneh Torah one could know the final Torah Laws without the reasons; see there. In the Shulhan Aruh Ha'Rav, loc. cit., it explains the statement by the Sages that "a (Jewish) person should divide his time for Torah study into thirds (i.e. three parts): Written Torah (the Hebrew Bible), "Mishnah," and "Gemara." There it explains that "Mishnah" as a general term includes any part of the Oral Torah that is recorded for the sake of basic knowledge. This includes those texts that present the opinions of established Torah Sages on Torah Laws in brief, without their explanations, like Mishneh Torah, Tur and Shulhan Aruh.

However, those sources that explain the reasons for the Torah Laws, such as Rosh and Beit Yosef, and those texts that explain the details of the Shulhan Aruh, are considered to be within the part of Torah that is called "Gemara" as a general term (which includes the Talmud, Midrash and Zohar).

According to this categorization, we can explain that anything that is within the part of Torah that is "Mishnah" is permitted for a pious Gentile to learn, because he is not delving into Torah; rather, he is just learning a text that teaches about Torah Law without its depth and reasons, as can be found in specific classic works, including Rambam's Mishneh Torah, Rabbi Yosef Karo's Shulhan Aruh, and certainly the Kitzur ("Abridged") Shulhan Aruh by Rabbi Shlomo Ganzfried, and likewise the Tractates of Mishnah itself by Rabbi Yehudah the Prince, without its subsequent explanations.

However, the explanations of the Mishnah, such as those of Rabbi Ovadiah Bartenurah, are considered part of "Gemara," as is explained in Likutei Sihot vol. 36, p. 17, because they explain the reasons and depth of the Mishnah.

But the Talmud itself, and the books of those codifiers who write in depth about the reasoning of the Torah Laws, like the Shulhan Aruh Ha'Rav, the Aruh Hashulhan, and the Mishnah Berurah, are definitely forbidden for Gentiles to learn, because this is called "delving into Torah."

This categorization is defined in responsa Mahaneh Hayim vol. 1, ch. 7. (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 88).

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #41 on: June 14, 2018, 09:49:55 AM »
If a miracle occurs for a Gentile and he returns to that place after an interval of a month or more, he may recite: Blessed are You, Lord our G-d, King of the universe, Who performed a miracle for me in this place (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 101-102).

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #42 on: June 15, 2018, 10:18:56 AM »
The day I received Volume I of "The Divine Code" was the turning point for me as a Noahide. Until then, I was looking into The Seven Commandments, finding it intriguing. But by reading "The Divine Code, Volume I," I realized I am a Noahide, that this is the real thing, and that G-d put "a new song into my mouth" (Psalms 40:4).

— Ole Mads Sirks Vevle, Regional Assistant, United Noahide Academies (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, back cover).

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #43 on: June 16, 2018, 03:21:17 PM »
What was the mistake of Enosh and his generation? In his days, mankind made a great mistake, and the wise men of that generation gave thoughtless and spiritually erroneous advice. They said that since G-d created the stars and the planets with which to control the world, and He put them in the heavens and treated them with honor, making them servants who minister before Him, it is therefore proper to praise them, glorify them, and treat them with honor. These people also said that it is the will of G-d that mankind should honor and make great those whom He magnified and honored, just as a king desires that the servants who stand before him will be honored, for doing so is an expression of honor to the king.

Once they thought this, they began to build places of worship for the stars and to offer sacrifices to them. They would praise and glorify them with words, and prostrate themselves before them, because by doing so, they would – according to their false conception – be fulfilling the will of G-d.

This was the essence of the worship of false gods, and this was the reasoning of those who worshiped them, and the explanation they gave. They did not say that there is no other god except for this star they were worshiping. This is what Jeremiah conveyed: "Who would not fear You, O King of the nations? For [kingship] benefits You, for among all the wise men of the nations and in all their kingdoms, [it is known that] there is none like You. But in one concept they are foolish and stupid; the vain [idols] which they teach are but wood." This means that all people knew that G-d alone exists, but it was from their mistake and their foolishness that they said that this vanity of theirs (the concept of independent intermediaries and the worship of idols) was G-d's will (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 139-140).

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #44 on: June 18, 2018, 10:04:34 AM »
Likewise, a teacher who is educating a minor student, in a field of study or trade, may strike the student in order to teach him. Both a father who strikes his child, and a teacher who strikes his student, must do so only in a light manner without cruelty. To strike a child strongly or with cruelty is not the way of education, but rather anger and revenge, and it is forbidden (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 446).

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #45 on: June 19, 2018, 09:01:19 PM »
It is not only idol worship that one is forbidden to stray after. It is also forbidden for a person to dwell upon any thought in his heart that causes him to abandon one of the fundamentals of the Torah faith. If one reflects on such thoughts and ideas without trying to remove his mind from them, he might start to be drawn after falsehood. For a person's knowledge is limited, and not all minds can completely understand the truth of G-d on an intellectual level. If every individual would go after the fancies of his own thoughts, the world would be destroyed by their short-mindedness.

How so? Sometimes a person strays after idol worship; sometimes he questions G-d's oneness, whether He is really one or two, or if He has a body. A person may sometimes think about a false prophecy, to question whether it is true or not. If he doesn't know the ways to arrive at the knowledge of the truth on his own, he will come to apostasy if he refuses to accept what is fundamental - including the historical facts of G-d's revelation at Mount Sinai, His speaking of the Ten Commandments to the Jewish nation, and His appointment of Moses to transmit the Written and Oral Torah (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 148).

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #46 on: June 21, 2018, 05:41:35 PM »
The main restriction against seclusion applies to a married woman and another man, since Gentiles are liable for the severe prohibition of adultery. It is righteous to extend this to seclusion between a single woman and a married or single man, lest they become aroused to commit licentious actions with each other. Since people's hearts are naturally drawn to this, it is therefore the practice of pious people to be especially cautious (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 548-549).

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #47 on: June 23, 2018, 06:13:58 PM »
Every person has natural traits, and there are other traits that one acquires by regularly habituating himself to act in these ways. A person must always evaluate his traits and strive to bring them toward the correct path.

How so? One must especially strive not to become angered or to be an angry person, for these traits are despicable and they destroy one's life. Therefore, the Sages taught that anyone who gets angry suffers the departure of his intellect, and this type of a life is greatly lacking. If one is naturally an angry person, he should train himself not to get angry at all, and he should force himself to act with humility and patience toward others by habit, until he permanently acquires these good traits. Likewise with other character traits, one should evaluate himself truthfully to determine if he acts as a righteous person would, and he should correct himself to act in a way that finds favor in the eyes of G-d and in the eyes of other people (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 121).

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #48 on: June 25, 2018, 12:59:08 AM »
The truth of the existence of created beings is relative and subsidiary to, and a result of, the truth of His Being. For they exist only because, and as long as, it is His will that they exist. The creation and sustained existence of the spiritual and physical realms is only a result of G-d's speech (Gen. ch. 1) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 47). 

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #49 on: June 26, 2018, 07:03:08 AM »
Likewise, it is forbidden to give bad advice to a person, that will cause him harm, as it says* "Before a blind person, do not put a stumbling block" — meaning that if a person is "blind" in a certain matter, do not give him wrong advice in that area which would cause him to be unwittingly damaged.

* Leviticus 19:14, and this is logically prohibited.

Rabbi Zalman Nehemiah Goldberg notes that it is clear that the verse "Before a blind person, do not put a stumbling block," does not constitute a Torah-law prohibition upon Gentiles, as explained by Tosafot and Rema Yoreh De'ah 151, and Tractate Avodah Zarah ch. 1, that one may sell an item used for idol worship to a Gentile if there is no suspicion that he will use it in this function, and this is even permissible if it is known that he will sell it to a third party who will surely use it in idol-worship. In the comparative case for a Jew, there would be a prohibition on the original seller because of, "Before a blind person, do not put a stumbling block."

On the other hand, it is possible that it is even forbidden for a Gentile to give another person bad advice, because it can be considered stealing, since it can cause the person to suffer a loss. Misleading one to sin, however, does not constitute this prohibition, since the one who is sinning is responsible for his own actions. This is explained by Ahiezer and by the Ponoviz'er Rav (Rabbi Shlomo Kahanaman) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 449).