Author Topic: The Divine Code Daily Dose  (Read 44253 times)

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Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #525 on: September 10, 2020, 10:14:07 PM »
Gentiles are permitted to read the 24 books of the Hebrew Bible, even with traditional explanations of the simple meaning (e.g., by Rashi), in order to correctly understand the verses. But it is forbidden for a Gentile to delve into study of the Written Torah (except for verses that discuss the Seven Noahide Commandments) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 75).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #526 on: September 16, 2020, 06:00:44 PM »
Rambam, Laws of the Torah Scroll 10:8: a Gentile may hold a Torah and read from it. It appears that the main traditional Jewish commentators of the Hebrew Bible (e.g., Rashi, Ramban, Sforno) are not included in the prohibition of Gentiles learning Torah in-depth as it is explained in Shulhan Aruh, because there it talks about analyzing the text in-depth by comparing verses and explaining them, to draw out the points of Torah Law that are implied within them. But those commentators (such as Rashi) whose sole purpose is to explain the simple meaning of the text do not derive in-depth conclusions from the verses. If they occasionally cite words of the Sages (such as Midrash) to explain how a verse is to be simply understood, it appears that the Gentile must look at the main point that the commentator is presenting (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 75).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #527 on: September 21, 2020, 02:16:41 AM »
These are Gen. 1:26-30, 2:16-25 (and possibly ch. 3), ch. 4, 6:1-12, 8:15-22, 9:1-7 (Possibly the first two Torah portions, Bereishit and Noah, are permitted for in-depth study, because they relate to humanity in general) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 75).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #528 on: September 25, 2020, 07:33:46 PM »
It is obvious that it is permissible for a Gentile to recite verses from the Hebrew Bible as prayer, particularly the verses of Psalms. If a question in Torah Law arises for a Gentile and the verdict is not explicit and clearly explained in the permitted sources, he does not have the ability or power to identify the correct ruling. Rather, he must ask a reliable and observant Jewish Torah scholar, for only they have permission to explain the Torah and decide what the correct Torah-law ruling is in any particular situation (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 76).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #529 on: September 27, 2020, 06:57:54 PM »
This is concerning a questionable situation that requires a Torah-law decision, and deciding on an answer is equivalent to delving deeply into the Torah. More so, a Gentile may not be ordained to teach and expound the Torah, because that is solely the spiritual assignment of the Jews - to be deeply involved in Torah, and to delve into it for the purpose of deciding practical rulings on a Torah-law basis. This task is only given to observant Jewish Torah scholars who are trusted in their explanations of Oral Torah (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 76).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #530 on: October 05, 2020, 12:58:02 AM »
However, if a matter is easily understandable from learning about the Noahide Code and the conclusion is obvious, it appears clear that a Gentile is allowed to decide upon it for matters of personal practical observance. But it is essentially difficult to decide an exact conclusion for Torah law in general, and laypersons do not have the objectivity and breadth of Torah knowledge to be certain that they are making the correct ruling (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 76).

Offline Israel Chai

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #531 on: October 09, 2020, 03:01:00 AM »
However, if a matter is easily understandable from learning about the Noahide Code and the conclusion is obvious, it appears clear that a Gentile is allowed to decide upon it for matters of personal practical observance. But it is essentially difficult to decide an exact conclusion for Torah law in general, and laypersons do not have the objectivity and breadth of Torah knowledge to be certain that they are making the correct ruling (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 76).

This is why the second category of people that are overly strict next to "people that like to torture themselves" are "people that are ignorant" in Gemarra, you're afraid of breaking a law in an area you don't understand so you start forbidding everything permitted.
The fear of the L-rd is the beginning of knowledge

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #532 on: October 09, 2020, 03:12:53 AM »
This is why the second category of people that are overly strict next to "people that like to torture themselves" are "people that are ignorant" in Gemarra, you're afraid of breaking a law in an area you don't understand so you start forbidding everything permitted.

Would you agree that writing "G-d" is overly strict? I can provide sources which allow writing God's names in other languages for no reason.

Offline Israel Chai

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #533 on: October 09, 2020, 04:08:16 AM »
Would you agree that writing "G-d" is overly strict? I can provide sources which allow writing God's names in other languages for no reason.

Yes completely. I secretly habor fears that it becomes common knowledge that the word comes from a norse idol, or it might be seen as giving respect to an idol G-d forbid. In the meantime, totally over the top way of showing respect for Hashem however I can, little symbol - but there I think about respect for Hashem's name when I say it. We can be a bit kiddish with some of those things, it's a love thing, you just want to do something for Hashem all the time because you love him even if it isn't anything, and it's not like we're really forbidding or allowing something that is going to make our lives hard.
The fear of the L-rd is the beginning of knowledge

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #534 on: October 10, 2020, 03:34:18 PM »
The "secret" part of Torah that is called Kabbala is governed by the same principles as Talmud, regarding the parts a Gentile may learn.98

98 For parts of Kabbala that do not relate to the Noahide Code, it is delving into Torah for its own sake, since Gentiles cannot learn anything practical from that, so there is no benefit for them. This is the simple meaning of Tractate Hagigah 13a, that Jews may not teach the "secrets" of the Torah to Gentiles, and therefore Gentiles may not learn it by themselves either. Also, one may not learn original Kabbala texts (e.g. Zohar) without a fitting teacher, and therefore automatically it is impossible for Gentiles to learn true Kabbala by themselves. They would need to be taught by Jews, which is forbidden for a Jew to do if it extends to parts unrelated to the Noahide Code (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 76).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #535 on: October 17, 2020, 06:01:36 AM »
As in Talmud, the parts that relate to the Noahide Code, e.g. knowledge of the greatness of God, His Unity, etc., are permitted, and are recommended. These parts from the Talmud have already been quoted and explained in later works, e.g. in Rambam's Mishneh Torah and in this work. Likewise, these parts from Kabbala are explained in later books. Studying from original sources without guidance is impractical (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 76).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #536 on: October 22, 2020, 05:33:01 AM »
The trendy matters called "popular kabbala," and learning from false teachers, are fake, and this is not part of Torah at all. Furthermore, Kabbala must never be promoted or "observed" as a religion in and of itself (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 77).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #537 on: October 24, 2020, 09:31:16 AM »
Even though a Gentile is obligated to learn the details of the Seven Noahide Commandments and the Noahide Code that he is commanded to follow, this learning itself is not in the category of a particular commandment (something that Gentiles are additionally commanded to observe). Gentiles do not have a Divine commandment of learning Torah, but this is rather an obligation that is included in the Noahide Commandments themselves. It is included in every Divine commandment that the one who is commanded should know and be involved in learning how to keep that commandment (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 77).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #538 on: October 29, 2020, 11:19:16 PM »
Therefore, when a Gentile learns a part of Torah for the purpose of observing a Noahide commandment, he receives a reward, in addition to the reward for observing the Seven Noahide Commandments themselves.99

99 Foreword to Nahalat Ya'akov, quoted in S'dei Hemed, vol. 1, ch. 112 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 77).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #539 on: November 09, 2020, 01:55:11 AM »
And even more so, since his learning Torah about the Noahide Commandments is connected to the particular commandment that it relates to, the learning is a fulfillment of a directive from God. Therefore, learning about the Seven Noahide Commandments is called a permissible "involvement" in Torah study,100 and the reward for this learning and involvement in Torah is great.101

100 The wording of Rambam in Laws of Kings ch. 10 is, "They may not be 'deeply involved' in anything other than their Seven Noahide Commandments," which follows the wording in Tractate Sanhedrin 59a.

101 But this is not like the involvement of a Jew in learning Torah, as Meiri writes on Tractate Avodah Zarah 3, and Rashba on Tractate Bava Kama 38 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 77).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #540 on: November 17, 2020, 03:49:49 AM »
In brief we can conclude that there are three levels of Torah study:

a) Learning Torah "for its own sake," which is the aspect of Torah that is a betrothal and inheritance from God to the Jews alone, and is forbidden for Gentiles.

b) Deep learning of the Seven Noahide Commandments and the full breadth of the Noahide Code by pious Gentiles for the sake of observing their obligations. Since a Gentile is commanded by God regarding the Noahide Code, and this includes the study of these precepts within Torah, the reward for this study is great; it is a spiritual reward that is like the reward as for observing the Noahide commandments.

c) For other Torah study that is permitted for Gentiles but is not related to the observance of an obligatory precept, there is no great spiritual reward. Instead, there is the reward of the benefit it provides for him, like the advantages he can derive from the Jewish precepts that are permissible for him, which may be performed by Gentiles only for the sake of the practical benefit that will result (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 77-78).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #541 on: November 18, 2020, 04:32:13 PM »
If the Gentile is one of the "pious of the nations of the world" who keep the Seven Noahide Commandments as their part in the Torah of Moses102 because he is commanded to do them, and he is careful in their proper observance according to the Noahide Code, and he is involved in learning the parts of Torah that relate to these seven commandments, he is indeed considered before God as being as honorable as a proper Jewish High Priest who served in the Holy Temple.103 A hint to this is that Shem, the son of Noah, was completely righteous,104 and he was involved in Torah study.105 Thus the verse praises him, saying, "he was a 'priest' (kohen in Hebrew) to God on High."106

102 Sefer Mitzvot Katan ("S'MaK") in the foreword, and Meiri ibid.

103 Tractate Sanhedrin 59a.

104 See Tractate Sukkah 52b, and the explanation by Rashi there.

105 Rashi on Genesis 25:22, according to the Midrash Bereishit Rabbah there.

106 Genesis 14:18, based on Tractate Nedarim 32; Rashi on this verse says that "Malki-tzedek" was Noah's son, Shem. "Kohen" in Scripture can also refer to a person of esteem; see II Samuel 8:18 about King David's sons (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 78).

Offline Israel Chai

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #542 on: November 19, 2020, 06:14:44 PM »
If the Gentile is one of the "pious of the nations of the world" who keep the Seven Noahide Commandments as their part in the Torah of Moses102 because he is commanded to do them, and he is careful in their proper observance according to the Noahide Code, and he is involved in learning the parts of Torah that relate to these seven commandments, he is indeed considered before God as being as honorable as a proper Jewish High Priest who served in the Holy Temple.103 A hint to this is that Shem, the son of Noah, was completely righteous,104 and he was involved in Torah study.105 Thus the verse praises him, saying, "he was a 'priest' (kohen in Hebrew) to God on High."106

102 Sefer Mitzvot Katan ("S'MaK") in the foreword, and Meiri ibid.

103 Tractate Sanhedrin 59a.

104 See Tractate Sukkah 52b, and the explanation by Rashi there.

105 Rashi on Genesis 25:22, according to the Midrash Bereishit Rabbah there.

106 Genesis 14:18, based on Tractate Nedarim 32; Rashi on this verse says that "Malki-tzedek" was Noah's son, Shem. "Kohen" in Scripture can also refer to a person of esteem; see II Samuel 8:18 about King David's sons (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 78).

Yeah it's hard enough for us to stand alone as us, but when you have a Noachide 99% of the time it's him, a yochid (alone). I learned a story in yeshiva about the yochid. Abraham was talking to the evil king Nimrod and Nimrod said I worship fire. Abraham said then let's worship water, it puts fire out. Nimrod said, "let us". Abraham said so lets worship wind that can make waves, and he said kay again, so Abraham said lets worship man that can withstand wind when it blows and Nimrod said "this is foolishness, I bow only to fire" and then decided to throw him into a fire. Now the angel Gabriel who is in charge of fire said awesome Hashem, let me handle this one, but Hashem said, "no, Abraham is a yochid (alone, one, other stuff that basically means everyone is on one side and he's on the other) and I am a Yochid, and us Yochids stick together", and so the fire didn't burn Abraham. Then his brother who didn't really believe in G-d like pretended he was all tough like Abraham so he got thrown in too, but he cooked.

Then Gabriel went to Hashem and was all like "I totally wanted to do a mitzvah and you took it", so Hashem's like cool, I'll make it up to you, so a thousand years later there were three yochids in Babylon, their names in Bablyonian were Shadrak, Mishak and Abbendigo or something that sounds like that, and Hashem said "Kay Gabriel, now's your chance", and they threw them into the fire, and angel Gabriel decided to put on a big show because he's all cool and stuff and made the fire inside feel more temperate and comfortable the hotter they'd make it, and make the outside where all the Babylonians were hotter the more the fire burned, so they all cooked.

There's a hundred morals I could glean lying down and I'm small in Torah compared to so many I've met, but the one I want you to take is that Hashem is jumping in front of angels jumping to help someone who stands for what's right in a sea of the opposite, even the fires in your life bring comfort and justice.
The fear of the L-rd is the beginning of knowledge

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #543 on: November 25, 2020, 07:27:04 AM »
But a Gentile who does not observe his seven commandments, even if he learns about them but not for the sake of fulfilling them, is indeed sinful, and he will be punished by the Hand of Heaven for this Torah learning.107 If he serves idols (or follows other paths of heresy),108 and nevertheless involves himself in Torah learning, he is liable for capital punishment by the Hand of Heaven.109

107 As implied from Meiri on Tractate Sanhedrin 59a.

108 I.e. if he is viewed in Torah Law like one who serves idols.

109 From the wording of Tractate Sanhedrin 59a, "An idol worshipper who is involved in Torah study is liable for death." Rambam explains, in Laws of Kings 10:9, that this refers to death by the Hand of Heaven (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 78).