Author Topic: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge  (Read 11659 times)

0 Members and 9 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline Noachide

  • Pro JTFer
  • *****
  • Posts: 544
Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #200 on: December 18, 2018, 05:44:13 AM »
A pious person will avoid gossip and lashon horah to the utmost, and will also be careful in all matters of speech. One should not even be involved with the “dust of lashon horah”. This is the expression the sages used to describe negative implications that are spoken about someone, without relating anything specifically, such as: “Who will tell so-and-so that he should always act the way he is acting now?” or “Don’t talk about so-and-so; I don’t want to say what happened!” or the like. The reason is because these insinuating comments will bring others to speak about that person in a negative way, and eventually it will result in evil speech - lashon horah. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 117)

Offline Noachide

  • Pro JTFer
  • *****
  • Posts: 544
Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #201 on: December 19, 2018, 07:08:05 AM »
Similarly, it is also considered to be “dust of lashon horah” when someone speaks favorably about a person in the presence of his enemies, for this will surely prompt them to rebut the praise and speak disparagingly about the person. One should also not thank or praise someone loudly in public, for those who overhear may be drawn to find ways to take advantage of the person. In this regard, King Solomon said: “ He who blesses his friend in a loud voice early in the morning [with loud thanks for favors he did the night before], it shall be considered a curse for him. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 118)

Offline Noachide

  • Pro JTFer
  • *****
  • Posts: 544
Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #202 on: December 20, 2018, 07:01:25 AM »
One should avoid gatherings of frivolous people who sit and speak words of folly, and this certainly applies if they habitually use profanity. Being involved with such things removes a person from the world. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 118)

Offline Noachide

  • Pro JTFer
  • *****
  • Posts: 544
Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #203 on: December 21, 2018, 06:08:18 AM »
Flattering other people should be avoided, for flattery is false and deceiving, and it is improper behavior for an upright person. One who is fearful of a sinner and therefore flatters him does not have proper fear of God, and deserves punishment for doing this. However, if someone is in serious danger from a sinner, and he can escape from the danger by using flattery, it is permitted to do so. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 118)

Offline Noachide

  • Pro JTFer
  • *****
  • Posts: 544
Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #204 on: December 22, 2018, 04:50:51 AM »
Beyond everything that is presented in this chapter, a pious person also endeavors to use his words and influence to promote matters which help establish a moral society. The foremost way to accomplish this is by establishing or supporting institutions and a society overall in which the Torah’s universal lessons of wisdom and good behavior are taught, to students who will go in that path. (And if one is able, he himself should be involved in teaching this, for the sages encouraged pious people to “raise up many disciples.”) For if someone brings many people to be meritorious, then in this merit, no sin will come about through him. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 118-119)

Offline Noachide

  • Pro JTFer
  • *****
  • Posts: 544
Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #205 on: December 24, 2018, 06:57:42 AM »
But if someone brings many people to sin, then he will not be given the opportunity to repent for his sins. In support of this teaching, the sages brought these prime examples:

Moses was meritorious and caused many people to be meritorious, and therefore the merit of the many is attributed to him, as it is stated, “He [Moses] performed the righteousness of God and His ordinances with Israel.” Jeroboam the son of Nevat sinned and caused many people to sin, and therefore the sin of the many is attributed to him; as is stated, “For the sins of Jeroboam, which he sinned and caused Israel to sin.” (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 119)


Offline Noachide

  • Pro JTFer
  • *****
  • Posts: 544
Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #206 on: December 24, 2018, 06:59:18 AM »
Honoring parents is commanded in the Torah – as it is stated, “Honor your father and mother,” and, “A man should fear his mother and father.” What is meant by fear of one’s parents? One should not stand or sit in his parents established places, nor argue with them, nor contradict their words in their presence in (regard to mundane matters). A person should not call either of his parents by their first names, but should rather call them by respectful terms for “Father” and “Mother” in accordance with the community’s custom. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 121)

Offline Noachide

  • Pro JTFer
  • *****
  • Posts: 544
Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #207 on: December 25, 2018, 05:31:22 AM »
What is considered honoring one’s parents? When it becomes difficult for one’s parents to shop for themselves, he should bring them proper food, drink, and clothing (paid for from the parents’ resources, if those are adequate). One should assist his parents as needed, and stand respectfully before them. One should also honor his parents with his words, and it should be recognized from his way of talking to them that he respects them highly. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 121-122)

Offline Noachide

  • Pro JTFer
  • *****
  • Posts: 544
Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #208 on: December 26, 2018, 06:39:41 AM »
One who curses, degrades or embarrasses a parent is a sinner and will be punished by Heaven for this sin, as Ham and his son Canaan were punished for disgracing Ham’s father, Noah. Therefore, even if one’s parents vex him, he should remain silent and not embarrass them. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 122)

Offline Noachide

  • Pro JTFer
  • *****
  • Posts: 544
Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #209 on: December 27, 2018, 06:08:24 AM »
One is obligated to honor his wife, and concern himself for her welfare. The sages said, “A man’s house is blessed solely due to his wife.” When there is peace, love and trust between a couple, blessing and success shine in the house. By the same token, a wife is obligated to honor her husband. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 122)


Offline Noachide

  • Pro JTFer
  • *****
  • Posts: 544
Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #210 on: December 28, 2018, 06:36:06 AM »
As part of the due respect between the couple, they should consult between themselves in conducting the affairs of the home, including the raising and education of their children, with true partnership.275 As a general statement, the sages said, “Who is honorable? One who honors the creations”276 (i.e., he even honors people whose only apparent praise is that they are creations of God). Surely, then, spouses must honor each other, both in private and in public.277

275 This assumes that both parents are believers in the One God. If one of the parents is an idol worshiper or an atheist, the God-fearing parent should make every effort in a respectful way to be the decider of the religious and moral education of the children, in accordance with Torah principles for righteous Gentiles.

276 Ethics of the Fathers 4:1

277 If one spouse dishonors the other in public, that is like a person who degrades his own self in public. Especially, a man who dishonors his wife should be considered dishonorable in the eyes of other people. A spouse who cannot honor the other partner should seek the advice of upright friends, or a professional marriage counselor. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 122)

Online Hrvatski Noahid

  • Master JTFer
  • ******
  • Posts: 1743
Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #211 on: December 28, 2018, 05:37:54 PM »
If one of the parents is an idol worshiper or an atheist, the God-fearing parent should make every effort in a respectful way to be the decider of the religious and moral education of the children, in accordance with Torah principles for righteous Gentiles.

And the other partner is obligated to divorce and separate.

Online Hrvatski Noahid

  • Master JTFer
  • ******
  • Posts: 1743
Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #212 on: December 28, 2018, 05:57:02 PM »
One should assist his parents as needed, and stand respectfully before them.

If one has evil parents, he must stay away from them.   

Offline Noachide

  • Pro JTFer
  • *****
  • Posts: 544
Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #213 on: December 29, 2018, 04:55:25 AM »
And the other partner is obligated to divorce and separate.
Yes, we can find this difference between Divine Code and Seven Gates. Sometimes it is not easy to leave your children and parents tend to stay together. But I agree that it is the right way to divorce.

Online Hrvatski Noahid

  • Master JTFer
  • ******
  • Posts: 1743
Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #214 on: December 29, 2018, 05:19:01 AM »
Yes, we can find this difference between Divine Code and Seven Gates. Sometimes it is not easy to leave your children and parents tend to stay together. But I agree that it is the right way to divorce.

I like that Torah allows divorce. If you made a mistake, you should not suffer for the rest of your life.

Offline Noachide

  • Pro JTFer
  • *****
  • Posts: 544
Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #215 on: December 29, 2018, 09:24:11 AM »
I like that Torah allows divorce. If you made a mistake, you should not suffer for the rest of your life.
I like this too. I like that Torah allows Gentile marriage without proper contract by having intimate relations for the purpose of marriage.

Offline Noachide

  • Pro JTFer
  • *****
  • Posts: 544
Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #216 on: December 29, 2018, 09:25:30 AM »
One should not be ungracious to God, and should instead give thanks to Him and praise Him for all the good He has bestowed upon him, especially for the greatest gift God gives a person – his children.

Both parents are obligated to be scrupulous regarding the raising of their children so that they should grow up in a proper manner: going in the ways of God, with good character traits and proper views that are consistent with Torah values about the world and their own lives. Parents should be vigilant that their children do not befriend anyone who would have bad influence on them. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 123)


Offline Noachide

  • Pro JTFer
  • *****
  • Posts: 544
Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #217 on: December 31, 2018, 06:40:39 AM »
It is obligatory for a person to ensure that his sons and daughters are each taught a useful trade, commensurate with their individual abilities, so they will be able to live honorably and not have to depend on public assistance. The sages said, “One who does not teach his son a trade, is as if he taught him to be a thief.” (Tractate Kiddushin 29a) (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 123)

Offline Noachide

  • Pro JTFer
  • *****
  • Posts: 544
Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #218 on: December 31, 2018, 06:41:17 AM »
It is proper for one to give money to his sons and daughters, even if they are past the age of maturity, in a way that directs them in an upright path and helps them to become self-supportive. The sages said, “One who gives money to his sons and daughters to learn a trade, and similarly one who provides food to his father and his mother, is included among those who give charity.” (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 123)

Offline Noachide

  • Pro JTFer
  • *****
  • Posts: 544
Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #219 on: January 01, 2019, 06:22:55 AM »
God praised Abraham for guiding his children and his followers in this way, as God said about him: “For I have known him, because he commands his children and his household after him, that they shall keep the path of God, to perform charity and justice, so that God will bring upon Abraham that which He spoke about him.”(Genesis 18:19) This refers to the promises and blessings which God gave to Abraham. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 123)

Offline Noachide

  • Pro JTFer
  • *****
  • Posts: 544
Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #220 on: January 02, 2019, 05:34:17 AM »
It is explained in The Divine Code that Gentiles are obligated to give charity and do acts of kindness, to be concerned for the welfare of the poor and unfortunate, and give to them aid. One who gives proper charity is acting piously; he is acting in accordance with the image of God in which he is created, for this is also the conduct of the Creator, Blessed be He. The sages said, “Just as the Holy One, blessed be He, is called Merciful, so should you be merciful; just as He is called Gracious, so should you be gracious ...” (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 124)

Offline Israel Chai

  • Silver Star JTF Member
  • ********
  • Posts: 6967
  • 112
Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #221 on: January 02, 2019, 08:54:58 AM »
It is explained in The Divine Code that Gentiles are obligated to give charity and do acts of kindness, to be concerned for the welfare of the poor and unfortunate, and give to them aid. One who gives proper charity is acting piously; he is acting in accordance with the image of God in which he is created, for this is also the conduct of the Creator, Blessed be He. The sages said, “Just as the Holy One, blessed be He, is called Merciful, so should you be merciful; just as He is called Gracious, so should you be gracious ...” (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 124)

There are levels of charity. If kiddush is empty, maybe spending more on moshke is the answer, maybe spending it on kiruv is, or maybe you should be freeing the captive with your time. Just like in business, innovation and originality leads to success and the profits don't disappear from your account forever.
The fear of the L-rd is the beginning of knowledge

Offline Israel Chai

  • Silver Star JTF Member
  • ********
  • Posts: 6967
  • 112
Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #222 on: January 02, 2019, 09:01:46 AM »
In an attempt to potentially demystify my words, if you can look at the one receiving the blessing from the act of you giving money to a guy on the street as you, then the holy business you're undertaking is sitting on the street collecting heaven money, and if you start an organization that puts people's time into it, it's like you started a company that makes heaven profits and the next examples I'm not smart enough to write in a way that's not too cryptic but maybe someone holier can get the picture and help out.
The fear of the L-rd is the beginning of knowledge

Offline Noachide

  • Pro JTFer
  • *****
  • Posts: 544
Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #223 on: January 03, 2019, 07:20:30 AM »
In an attempt to potentially demystify my words, if you can look at the one receiving the blessing from the act of you giving money to a guy on the street as you, then the holy business you're undertaking is sitting on the street collecting heaven money, and if you start an organization that puts people's time into it, it's like you started a company that makes heaven profits and the next examples I'm not smart enough to write in a way that's not too cryptic but maybe someone holier can get the picture and help out.
My idea is to help people in the way you can. Someone is not in the situation to give charity so he can help with the act of kindness. After all there was a quote in the Divine Code Daily Dose thread: An act of kindness is greater than charity, as it can be done for the rich as well as the poor, and can be done both with money as well as bodily effort (such as visiting the sick, gladdening a bride and groom, and escorting a friend). As well, charity is done only for the living, whereas one can do kindness for the dead as well (such as eulogizing, escorting the bier and burying the dead) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 695).

Offline Noachide

  • Pro JTFer
  • *****
  • Posts: 544
Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #224 on: January 03, 2019, 07:21:31 AM »
The focal point of kindness is giving charity to the poor. It is the hallmark of a pious person to be charitable with the needy, and for a Gentile this is truly pious behavior, for he is going beyond the measure of the law in his relationship with both God and his fellowman. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 124)