Author Topic: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge  (Read 2354 times)

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Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #50 on: August 06, 2018, 07:57:12 AM »
The Oral Torah teaches that God created seven things before He created the world: Torah, Repentance, Gan Eden (the spiritual Garden of Eden), Gehinom (the spiritual Purgatory), His Throne of Glory, the Holy Temple, and the name of the Messiah. This means that it arose in God’s thought that these things were necessary for the existence of the world that He would create.

God, blessed be He, created His world for the purpose He desired – as the sages said, “God desired to have a dwelling place in the lowest (i.e. physical) world.” This clearly teaches that God’s objective for His creation of the world was to make a physical place which would be perfectly fitting for His Presence to rest in. The service of all mankind beginning from the time of Adam, the first person, is to contribute to reaching this objective. God has promised through His prophets in the Hebrew Bible that His desired future time will be realized through the coming of the true Messiah, from the dynasty of King David, who will usher in the era when all people will see God’s truth and the righteousness of all His ways – as the verse says, “And the glory of God will be revealed, and all flesh will see together that the mouth of God has spoken.”(Isaiah 40:5) (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 178)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #51 on: August 07, 2018, 05:13:53 AM »
God’s existence is independent. That is to say, it is not dependent on anything else, whereas the existence of every creation is dependent on God’s will to create it. In the terminology of the sages, this is called God’s Requisite Existence, which means that there is no cause for His existence. Rather, His existence is essential and due to Himself. His creations, on the other hand are called possible existences, since their existence always depends on another cause, and it is possible that they will either exist or not exist.

Therefore, God’s existence is not at all comparable to that of any created thing in the Heavens above or the earth below, including time and space and anything that exists within the context of those dimensions. Every creation has limitations to its existence and power and is comprised of multiple parts and elements, be they physical or spiritual. Therefore nothing can be compared to the Holy One, Blessed be He, Who has no limitation to Himself or His power. His power is infinite, endless and unlimited, and His existence is not made up of any combinations. Rather, His existence is a simple Oneness, which has no end and no beginning, and no reason or objective for being. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 14-15)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #52 on: August 08, 2018, 05:07:26 AM »
Since it has been clarified that God does not have any type of body or corporeal form, it is also clear that none of the functions of a body are appropriate to Him – neither connection nor separation, neither place nor measure, neither ascent nor descent, neither right nor left, neither front nor back, neither standing nor sitting, etc.

God transcends time, so He does not have a beginning, an end, or any age. He does not change, for there is nothing that can cause Him to change. He creates time and space, and those limited dimensions are part of the overall limitations of the universe. But He, in His true existence, is not limited by anything, and therefore He is not under the influence of time and space. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 17)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #53 on: August 09, 2018, 04:28:34 AM »
In all respects, the actions of God in His creation of all things are incomparable to those of a human. A human’s actions can only change an entity from one created form to another, as in the case of the artisan who takes a block of silver and changes its form into the shape of a vessel. When he finishes shaping the vessel, it leaves his hands, and its existence is not dependent on him, just as the original block of metal was not dependent on him, since he did not create it. God, however, creates the substance and form of the vessel, and the same applies for all His creations; their existence is contingent on His will to create them “ex nihilio,” which is the Latin term for coming into being “from complete nonexistence” at every instant. Thus there is no reason for the created entity to exist other than the power of God’s command and utterance which actualizes His will that this entity be created and exist in a particular way. In other words, every particular thing exists through a particular creative force that emanates from God, and that particular force is derived from much greater general power of His Ten Utterances that are recorded in Genesis, Chapter 1. It is in this way that the Heavenly realms , the universe, our Earth, and all their hosts are created from nothing. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 20)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #54 on: August 10, 2018, 04:13:27 AM »
A true recognition of the existence of God in every detail of the world, and in every detail of a person’s life, brings a person to a recognition of God’s Divine Providence over His creations. Simply stated, every entity, with its life and existence, is being constantly created at every moment by God’s will and with His knowledge, and it has been previously explained in Chapter 1 that He and His knowledge are One. Conversely, His knowledge of every detail of a thing as it is being created by Him, and of what is happening to it, and His will for it to continue to exist and in certain condition, are not separate from the thing, but rather are part and parcel of it and cannot be separated from it, in a way that is impossible for us to understand.

These principles are the key to recognizing that God knows and is involved with what is happening in every detail of creation, at every moment, and that everything happens according to His purposeful plan. Not only a person’s actions – for example, when someone walks to a certain place at a certain time – but all other events, even the movements of inanimate objects, such as a leaf falling from a tree by the power of a wind and landing in a certain spot, are ordained by God for a specific purpose known to Him. This is the understanding of Divine Providence that was taught by Rabbi Israel Baal Shem Tov. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 27-28)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #55 on: August 11, 2018, 05:26:12 AM »
It is up to the person’s choice that the main concern which influences him should be his desire for closeness to God in all his ways, and not his desire for closeness to the lusts of his evil inclination. Therefore, the sages explained that the Torah’s directive to “cleave to God” means that a person should cleave to the holy Torah sages, for he will thereby create an environment for himself that is conductive to influencing his character in the righteous direction we have described. If on the other hand he decides to cleave to people who are hedonistic and immoral, that is the direction to which his character will be drawn.

Likewise, it is said about the knowledge of God, “And you shall know today and take to heart, that the Lord is God, in the heavens above and the earth below, there is no other.” The goal of this intellectual comprehension that God enjoins upon us is to fix a love for Him in one’s heart, for all of a person’s actions are drawn by the heart’s emotions. A person will always be quick to do what he loves, and he will withdraw from things that he fears. A person does not experience love for something unless he is yearning for it, and wishful thoughts of it are filling his mind. Likewise, one does not experience fear of a matter unless his thoughts compel him – either out of a fear of danger, or of exposing something he is ashamed of, or from the presence of something of greatness and high honor (i.e., the awe that motivates respect and bashfulness). (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 34-35)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #56 on: August 12, 2018, 04:56:49 AM »
The greatest level of prophecy were attained in the earlier, Biblical generations, by the men and women who were giants of piety. They were able to unite their consciousness entirely to God, Who then imparted a spirit of holiness to them so they could communicate Godliness in human terms to their wider communities. This is the high level of prophecy that is most commonly depicted in the Hebrew Bible (the Tanach). It is the most prominent aspect of the Tanach, because the concept of authentic prophecy and its characteristics are essential to understanding the truth of the One God and faith in His Torah. Without this, many fundamental themes would be negated, and the unique concept of a religion that is God-given, instead of man-made, would not be correctly understood. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 42)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #57 on: August 14, 2018, 05:46:54 AM »
What was the difference between the prophecy of Moses and that of the other prophets?

All other prophets experience their prophecy in a dream or a vision, whereas Moses would receive his prophecy while he was awake, lucid and standing – as it says: ”Moses came into the Tent of Meeting to speak with Him, and he heard the Voice speaking to Him.”(Numbers 7:89)

Furthermore, Divine insight (ru’ach ha’kodesh) is bestowed through the agency of an angel and is perceived as metaphoric imagery and allegories. But Moses, our teacher, would receive prophecy without the agency of an angel bringing it to him. The Torah testifies to this about him: “God would speak to Moses face to face, as a man would speak with his fellow,”(Exodus 33:11) and “Mouth to mouth do I (God) speak to him, in a clear vision and not in riddles; at the image of God does he gaze.” In other words, the prophecies to Moses were direct communications to him from God, without being couched in metaphors or allegories, and he would receive God’s statements directly and fully. His prophecy would be through direct and open revelation, and he would appreciate the matter in its fullness. Other prophets are overawed, terrified, and confounded by revelations they experience. The response of Moses, our teacher, was not in that manner, but rather, as quoted above, “as a man would speak with his fellow.” (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 51-52)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #58 on: August 14, 2018, 05:47:53 AM »
The everlasting faith that the Jewish people have in Moses, as the preeminent emissary of God, is not because of the miracles that he performed. Whenever a person’s faith in a prophet is based on the occurrence of a miracle, that faith is somewhat deficient, because it is possible for someone to bring about a “miraculous” (unexplainable) occurrence through magic or sorcery, or some concealed natural process. This leaves the authenticity of the occurrence as a Divine miracle open to doubt, because there might be some other explanation.

Therefore, the miracles that God performed through Moses, as recorded in the Torah, were not intended to serve as undeniable proof of the legitimacy of his prophecy. Rather, each one was performed to accomplish a purpose that was needed at that point in time. For example, when it was necessary to save the Israelites by drowning the Egyptian army, the sea split for Moses, and after the Israelites passed through on dry land, the Egyptians followed, and God returned the sea upon them. When the Israelites needed water, Moses struck the rock, and it provided a continuously flowing spring water. When Korach, Dathan and Abiram mutinied against Moses, he called upon God for the earth to open its mouth and swallow them. The same applies to all the other miracles that God performed through Moses.

What then is the foundation of the unique faith in Moses and the Torah he transmitted? It is the public testimony that God Himself gave about Moses during the revelation at Mount Sinai. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 55)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #59 on: August 15, 2018, 05:08:54 AM »
Therefore, if a person will arise, whether Jew or Gentile, and perform a sign or wonder and say that God sent him to do any of the following, he is a false prophet:

a) add a Divine commandment,

b) withdraw a Divine commandment,

c) explain a Divine commandment in a manner that differs from the tradition received from Moses, or

d) declare that the Divine commandments of the Torah are not forever, but rather were given for a limited time.

A person who calls for any of these things is denying the prophecy of Moses, because he dares to make statements in God’s Name that God never made. God, blessed be His Name, commanded Moses that His Torah and its commandments are for us and our children forever, and God is not like man that He will speak falsely. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 59)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #60 on: August 16, 2018, 06:04:45 AM »
A person needs to express his love to God in his actions and speech that God has gifted to him, for that is their purpose. How should a person accomplish this? The intended Divine service of a person is divided into two categories: that which is directed inward to the person himself, and that which is directed toward God.

The ultimate inward service is the desire, out of love for God, to be close to Him through recognizing and knowing Him. This must be combined with awe and fear of Him, which brings one to the rectification of his natural character and habits, and his deeds in the world. With this combined service of love and fear, a person can reach the high stature of a wise and righteous person.

Service directed toward God is the characteristic of a person who refines himself and is scrupulous to work on revealing his “image of God” with correct actions and correct speech. Such a person is careful not to sully himself like an animal with actions and speech that do not befit an “image of God”. With this effort, he rectifies himself and his society, and causes good effects in the world around him. This is how a person contributes to the accomplishment of God’s desire for the rectification of mankind and the rectification of the world. One should not imagine that his personal accomplishments in this Divine service are small and insignificant. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 69)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #61 on: August 17, 2018, 06:38:17 AM »
The primary and most important contemplation is on the very fact that God Himself gave commandments to mankind. This teaches us that God has a purpose for the creation, and He anticipates the time when the world will be brought to its proper rectification. God chose human beings to accomplish this goal through their actions.

Overall, the commandments teach us the lesson that a person is able to do good deeds and rectify himself and his environment. One should not think, in the manner of fools, that a person has no purpose other than to “live for the moment” and cannot accomplish anything of lasting value. Neither should one imagine the people have no free choice and have no effect or purpose at all, like mere puppets of God.

Certainly, a person should not view himself as being inherently evil from birth, or that it is impossible to improve one’s nature. Rather, a person should know and believe that since God commanded him and anticipates his doing specific good actions and his refraining from specific bad actions, therefore God surely has given him the power and ability to accomplishing these things in actual fact. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 72-73)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #62 on: August 18, 2018, 06:57:31 AM »
One should not pray while he is in a mood of frivolity, laughter, lightheadedness, hostility, or anger, nor interspersed with scoffing or idle talk. Instead, one should settle down quietly for a little while before prayer and concentrate until he can focus his mind and heart, and only then should he pray. About this, it is related that the early pious ones would tarry for one hour before beginning their prayers,(Mishnah Berachot 5:1) in order to focus their hearts and thoughts, so they could connect all the faculties of their soul with God while praying to Him with humility.

A person should not pray while intoxicated, since one cannot concentrate properly in that condition. Likewise, if one finds that his thoughts are confused due to worries, and he is not able to concentrate, he should delay his pray until later. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 89-90)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #63 on: August 19, 2018, 05:43:24 AM »
Though it seems that the main point of prayer is for a person to ask for his physical needs, the true main purpose is actually to connect a person with his Creator. One is obligated to ask God for his physical necessities, such as food, livelihood and health, but an even more essential and basic need of every person is his constant connection with God. Therefore one should ask God for this need as well – that God will be with him constantly in all his ways, and that all his ways should be fitting for this. (This is a main theme in the Book of Psalms.)

Prayer is not only a means to ask for and receive this need. One must know that the prayer itself is a connection with God.

In conversation and prayer to God, one connects with Him, for God listens to everyone’s prayers to Him. He provides for each person’s needs in general, and especially this spiritual need for those who feel it and therefore desire that connection. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 90)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #64 on: August 21, 2018, 06:21:39 AM »
What is the remedy for the morally ill? They should go to the wise people, for they are the healers of souls.192 They will heal them by teaching them how to acquire proper traits, until they return to the good path. Concerning those who recognize their bad traits and do not go to the wise to heal them, Solomon said: “Fools scorned wisdom and correction.”193

How are they healed? A wrathful person should train himself to feel no reaction even if he is beaten or cursed. He should follow this course of behavior for a long time, until the anger is uprooted from his heart.

192 By “wise people … the healers of souls”, Maimonides was referring to the Jewish sages, who have wisdom to help and cure others. It is clear that in practical terms, the teaching cited here applies to any wise person who understand and practices the correct traits for upright people, and the proper ways to correct and cure those who have unhealthy character traits.

193 Proverbs 1:7

(Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 96)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #65 on: August 22, 2018, 05:28:49 AM »
There is another area of life in which it is fitting to go beyond the measure of the law, and not just stay on the middle path, which is in one’s interaction with other people. Social interaction is essential, so even if one does not have bad traits in interacting with others, it is proper to behave towards other people in a manner that goes beyond what they deserve. This type of behavior promotes peace in society.

Needless to say, a wise and just person should conduct his business dealings with honesty and good faith. When his intention is “no” he says, “no”, when his intention is “yes”, he says, “yes.” But a pious person places additional personal boundaries on his business dealings, beyond the measure of the law. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 102)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #66 on: August 23, 2018, 05:20:33 AM »
The trait of modesty must be expressed in all of a person’s ways. Primary among these are one’s dress, involvements and speech.

How should one be modest in dressing? One should wear clothes that are befitting his rank, and not wear regal garb which draws everyone’s attention, nor dress in a manner of poverty which shames the person, nor in a way that is haughty. A person should wear good-looking, middle-range garments.

It goes without saying that a person needs to be modest and cover his body at all times, and not act like an animal that goes unclothed in the street unashamedly.

A person has intellect which is his “image of God,” and therefore one must dress accordingly, which is to say, honorably. This applies in particular to a woman, so she should cover her body appropriately. When a woman dresses immodestly, she removes from herself the honor of the image of God, and it invites the men who see her to contemplate being involved with her in the sin of promiscuity. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 104-105)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #67 on: August 24, 2018, 05:12:59 AM »
A person who lives in a place where the norms of behavior are bad, and the inhabitants do not follow the straight path, should move to a place where people are righteous and conduct themselves in a good ways. If the residents in all the places he is familiar with or hears reports about follow improper paths, or if valid reasons hinder him from moving to a place where the modes of behavior are proper, he should remain secluded from the bad people around him – as it is stated: “Let him sit alone and be silent.”226 Then if it happens that the wicked and sinful people there will not allow him to stay unless he mingles with them and follows their evil behavior, he should “go out to caves, thickets or deserts, [rather than] follow the paths of sinners – as it is stated:227 ‘Who will give me a lodging place for wayfarers, in the desert?’ “228

It is important to be associated with righteous people in all of one’s involvements, so as to be constantly influenced in a correct and good manner. This includes seeking advice from righteous people regarding one’s involvements and path in life.

226 Lamentations 3:28

227 Jeremiah 9:1

228 This is taken from Maimonides, Laws of Personal Development 6:1.

Although his advice to live in the wild as a hermit is not practical, it shows the great concern about how much other people can affect someone, and the efforts one must take to distance himself from associating with bad people.

(Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 108-109)

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #68 on: August 24, 2018, 07:03:48 AM »
Dr. Michael Schulman asked that I write a review of the book "Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge." I ordered the book.  :)   

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #69 on: August 25, 2018, 04:20:00 AM »
Dr. Michael Schulman asked that I write a review of the book "Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge." I ordered the book.  :)
Nice to hear that! You will certainly enjoy reading this book and learn many useful things. Once you write a review please share it with us.  :)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #70 on: August 25, 2018, 05:38:53 AM »
As a part of the prohibition against hating others, that same verse begins: “You shall not take revenge or bear a grudge...”

What is meant by “taking revenge”? Person A asks, “Lend me your hatchet [for example]. Person B responds, “I refuse to lend it to you.”

On the following day, Person B [who refused] needs to borrow a sickle. He asks Person A, “Lend me your sickle.” Person A responds, “Just as you did not lend to me, I will not lend to you.” This is considered to be taking revenge, and is an evil trait. Instead, one should help others with a full heart, without making reprisals against them for wrongs they did to him in past.

What is meant by “bearing a grudge”? Person A asked Person B, “Lend me your hatchet [for example],” and Person B was not willing to do so. On the following day, Person B asks Person A, “Lend me your sickle.” Person A tells him, “Here, it is. I am lending it to you. I am not like you, who would not lend to me, nor am I paying you back for what you did.” A person who acts in this manner is bearing a grudge. Instead, one should wipe such a matter from his heart and not bring it to mind. Therefore, when an unhelpful person comes asking for help, one should give it to him with a full heart, without thinking of being wronged in the past, because holding a grudge can lead to the possibility of seeking revenge. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 113-114)

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #71 on: August 25, 2018, 02:55:03 PM »
Nice to hear that! You will certainly enjoy reading this book and learn many useful things. Once you write a review please share it with us.  :)

I look forward to reading the whole book. I will share my review.  :)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #72 on: August 26, 2018, 06:00:51 AM »
It is forbidden to spread gossip. Who is a gossiper? One who collects information and then goes from person to person, saying: “This is what so and so said;” “This is what I heard about so and so.” Even if the statements are true, this sin can bring about destruction in the world, and can cause the death of many people, God forbid.251 Consider what happened because Doeg the Edomite gossiped to King Saul about the Jewish priests in the town of Nov, which caused of all those priests to be killed.252 For causing this, Doeg was cursed by King David, and died at half his intended life span.253

251 Maimonides, Laws of Personal Development, ch. 7.

252 I Samuel*, ch. 22.*

253 Tractate Sanhedrin 106b; this is what David wrote about in Psalms 55:24

(Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 116)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #73 on: August 27, 2018, 01:03:39 PM »
One should greet every person with a gracious and respectful countenance. By doing so, one implies that the other person is important and befitting to receive the greeting. One who turns away and does not greet others, or does not answer their greetings, implies that they are not befitting or important in his eyes, and this will embarrass a person greatly.

An upright person should not be ungracious, but rather should recognize the favors that another does for him. Ungraciousness is a bad trait which only causes evil to a person, for other people distance themselves from one who is ungracious, and they do not want companionship with such a person. Rather, one should always thank others appropriately, remembering and mentioning the good they did for him, and teach himself to do favors for others in their time of need. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 120-121)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #74 on: August 28, 2018, 05:53:04 AM »
When a person observes a joyous event and wishes to make a celebration feast, he should also provide from it food for the local needy and unfortunate people, so that God will also be joining in the joy of the occasion. Conversely, one who locks his house and feasts with his family, without feeding poor people, is not rejoicing with a righteous happiness, but rather he is only rejoicing in the satisfaction of his innards, and this is a disgraceful trait.297

Anyone who gives food and drink to the poor and orphans at his table merits that if he will need to call out to God, then God will answer him, and he will derive pleasure from Him – as it is stated,298 “Surely you should slice a piece of your bread for the hungry, and bring the moaning poor to your home … Then you will call and God will respond; you will cry out and He will say, ‘Here I am.’ ”299

297 Maimonides, Laws of Resting on the Holy Days 6:18

289 Isaiah 58:7,9

299 Maimonides, Laws of Gifts to the Poor 10:16

(Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 126-127)