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Online EveryJewA44

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Think A Local Chabad Rabbi Hates Me.. What about Chabad?
« on: September 13, 2013, 05:31:29 AM »
 I've been attending the Chabad for while, because I don't have the money to attend the other non-reform synagogues, such as Modern Orthodox/Orthodox synagogues where I live due to their very high fees.  A Yom Kippur service, e.g., at the Sefardic synagogue can run you hundreds of dollars in addition to 1000s of synagogue fees a year that are due.  If you think I am exaggerating, the yearly dues at the synagogue I was attending were $2000+ (not including holiday services and other events).   A lot of Jews where I live also have what I call the "shun system", where they will let you come and attend, but people will be unfriendly to you and ignore you because they see you are not paying the high fees, like them.  Not every synagogue where I live is like this, but sadly, a lot of the synagogues are in wealthy areas of the city, as the Jewish community is wealthy, so almost everyone in the community pays the dues in addition to pledging large amounts of additional money.   I ended up leaving the synagogue , because I felt looked down by the other members for lacking income.    The area I live has not been a happy experience for me.  It seems like most Jews here are conceited and everyone is just out for themselves.  Also, most Jews here are very secular and will support all liberal causes, despite the fact that some will claim to be conservative. 


Well, I was attending a Chabad where I live and told the Rabbi that I am a Kahanist and conservative.  He said, "you're a Kahane guy?"  He invited me to his home for dinner, which I respected , but I just felt the conversation with him was a bit tense.  There was a lot of things that made me feel uncomfortable about him, but he told me everything said in his home was acceptable. I  said if anything sounds controversial, then I could refrain from saying it, as I told him my purpose to attend his synagouge was to grow in Judaism and join a diverse community.  I actually like the people who attend the synagogue and it for being so small has a very diverse ethnic makeup, including Bukharian, Yemenite, Mizrachi, Persian and Ashkenazi Jews.   However, I felt a sour feeling from the Rabbi and it makes me sad, but now I feel I should no longer attend his synagogue.    What upset me, was that I came to attend his Rosh Hashanna service and he just ignored me.  He saw me , looked at me , then looked the other way and walked by me.  Instead, he would greet all the other people next to me, saying "Shana Tova", but not me.  I felt hurt.   Then I called him to ask about Yom Kippur services, if I need to reserve a spot and which would be best to attend, since I live too far away from the synagogue to spend the entire day/night there.     He didn't bother calling me back.  I guess I got the message, that my kind isn't liked here.  I told him I am a Kahanist, ZIonist, Right-Wing on most issues, but I respect and love all Jewish people.  I also told him I Felt connected to the Mizrachi culture.  Maybe, this caused some dissension?   I just felt overall not liked by the Rabbi.

After doing some research about this Rabbi, I found out some disturbing news.  It turns out the Rabbi even writes on his Chabad page that his grandfather was the founder of Neturei Karta, the most diabolic and anti-Semitic groups to come into existence.  I dare not call them Jews.  On that note, I won't say the name of the grandfather, but anybody who wants to research the foundations of this organization will find out.    Of course, I know I cannot blame his grandfather for his actions, but why he boasts that he is his grandfather and calls him a "great Torah SCholar" on his web page baffles me.     

Also, I have started to question some ethics of Chabad as I keep attending.  The fact that they provide a place for Jews to worship without breaking the bank account is noble.  However, I have been hearing rumors of many Chabadniks being anti-Israel.    The Chabad rabbi I have had for a while I know is Zionistic and not anti-Israel.   However, I wonder about some of the others.  Note, the Zionist Chabad rabbi I am talking about is not the same rabbi who I believe does not like me.  This is another rabbi.   

Also, there seems to be a great love and appreciation for the blood-sucking Tzar of Russia.  I get tired of hearing some of rabbis talk about how great and G-d fearing was the Tzar.   After doing more historical research, I have found out that the founding fathers of the Chabad actually aided the Tzar in the battle against Napoleon and were major contributors to helping Russia in the victory, serving as spies and performing intelligence operations.  Did it matter that Napoleon respected the Jewish people and wanted to help them re-build the Temple in Jerusalem, whereas the Tzar would treat us like inferior rodents who murdered his g_d?  Did it matter that the Tzar would send his soldiers to our villages to steal our wealth, rape our women , murder and torture our people?  This is something you will not hear these Chabad rabbis ever speak about.  Instead, they like to boast about how the Tzar protected us and feared G-d.  It makes my blood boil.  I almost walked out of the Shabbat service one day after hearing it.   

Then there is the issue with Messiah worship and teaching their kids Yiddish instead of Hebrew.  Some Chabad rabbis won't let their kids speak in Hebrew, except during prayer, and then only Ashkenazi Hebrew.

Well, I do keep all my criticisms of Chabad to myself.  But, I question the integrity of the organization at times.   I guess I wonder why the Rabbi doesn't like me?  Is it because I said I was a Kahanist?   He seem to get  disturbed when I told him I was a conservative and that I didn't care for the city I lived because of how liberal it is.  For example, the city near where I live has a high rate of homosexuality and voted 80% liberal.  You will see gay men walking down the streets kissing and holding hands.  I was hoping a Rabbi, a spiritual teacher, could be open to my thoughts and concerns.


Sorry, if I sound of a low spirit, cynical or depressed.  I have had not the happiest time where I Live.  I feel rather rejected by my own people and just like a lost sheep wandering in a valley of wolves.  I don't realy know where to go.  I am too right-wing, conservative for the reform synagogues, although after talking to some of them, they seem to be the most eager to welcome me, despite my lack of finances.  Sadly, most of them  will have female or homosexual rabbis and chazzans and I would not be able to stomach that, nor can I appreciate their new age and modernized style of worship.  I am a traditional person and dream of a traditional life with my Jewish spiritual family. 
« Last Edit: September 13, 2013, 06:05:06 AM by EveryJewA44 »
Rabbi Kahane:  http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL76A7B68A01E5CACC

"To turn the other cheek is not a Jewish concept. Do not listen to the soothing anesthesia of the establishment. They walk in the paths of those whose timidity helped bury our brothers and sisters less than thirty years ago."

—Rabbi Meir Kahane, Jewish Defense League founder

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Re: Think A Local Chabad Rabbi Hates Me.. What about Chabad?
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2013, 07:03:38 AM »
Don't take any if it personally. The rabbi doesn't hate you. He's been busy.
If someone says something bad about you, say something nice about them. That way, both of you would be lying.

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Re: Think A Local Chabad Rabbi Hates Me.. What about Chabad?
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2013, 08:18:57 AM »
I think you may be overreacting, and it may be a misunderstanding.   He probably does NOT hate you or kahanists.   In addition to that, most Chabad rabbis are not the grandson of the naturei karta founder, but that's besides the point.     And lastly, I don't see why it should cost thousands of dollars for a seat, I davened at a nice yeshiva for rosh hashana and the seat cost me about 90 dollars.

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Re: Think A Local Chabad Rabbi Hates Me.. What about Chabad?
« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2013, 10:42:50 AM »
The Lubavitcher Rebbe passed away 20 years ago, and a new generation of Chabad Hassidim are emerging who were never exposed to his tzidkus: hence they are declining in to the studied mediocre middos of most Haredim.



There are now actually Lubavitchers really in to fashion, something unthinkable when the Rebbe was alive!

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Re: Think A Local Chabad Rabbi Hates Me.. What about Chabad?
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2013, 03:46:48 PM »
The Lubavitcher Rebbe passed away 20 years ago, and a new generation of Chabad Hassidim are emerging who were never exposed to his tzidkus: hence they are declining in to the studied mediocre middos of most Haredim.



There are now actually Lubavitchers really in to fashion, something unthinkable when the Rebbe was alive!
I don't know about that Rabbi Shea Hecht was dressing sporty even when the Rebbe,ZT"L,ZY"A was alive with his bow tie & red or maroon yarmulka & Indiana Jones hats.

Offline Kahane-Was-Right BT

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Re: Think A Local Chabad Rabbi Hates Me.. What about Chabad?
« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2013, 03:52:07 PM »
What's wrong with a rabbi dressing fashionably?   lol, this thread got silly fast

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Re: Think A Local Chabad Rabbi Hates Me.. What about Chabad?
« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2013, 03:53:38 PM »
What's wrong with a rabbi dressing fashionably?   lol, the thread always gets silly when yerusha is drawn in .
Absolutely nothing & there have been great rabbis who have done so.

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Re: Think A Local Chabad Rabbi Hates Me.. What about Chabad?
« Reply #7 on: September 15, 2013, 09:09:12 PM »
I am going to try to address this point by point, I am not a Chabad Hasid but I do have some Chabad leanings and know alot about Hasidic history.

I've been attending the Chabad for while, because I don't have the money to attend the other non-reform synagogues, such as Modern Orthodox/Orthodox synagogues where I live due to their very high fees.  A Yom Kippur service, e.g., at the Sefardic synagogue can run you hundreds of dollars in addition to 1000s of synagogue fees a year that are due.  If you think I am exaggerating, the yearly dues at the synagogue I was attending were $2000+ (not including holiday services and other events).   A lot of Jews where I live also have what I call the "shun system", where they will let you come and attend, but people will be unfriendly to you and ignore you because they see you are not paying the high fees, like them.  Not every synagogue where I live is like this, but sadly, a lot of the synagogues are in wealthy areas of the city, as the Jewish community is wealthy, so almost everyone in the community pays the dues in addition to pledging large amounts of additional money.   I ended up leaving the synagogue , because I felt looked down by the other members for lacking income.    The area I live has not been a happy experience for me.  It seems like most Jews here are conceited and everyone is just out for themselves.  Also, most Jews here are very secular and will support all liberal causes, despite the fact that some will claim to be conservative.   

This is not unusual, many Shuls use Yom Kippur as their main day for fundraising. One of the nice things about Chabad is they dont charge fees or for attendance on Yom Kippur or other Chagim. Many of the wealthy Jews want to be accepted by non-Jewish society and that usually means accepting liberal values.

Well, I was attending a Chabad where I live and told the Rabbi that I am a Kahanist and conservative.  He said, "you're a Kahane guy?"  He invited me to his home for dinner, which I respected , but I just felt the conversation with him was a bit tense.  There was a lot of things that made me feel uncomfortable about him, but he told me everything said in his home was acceptable. I  said if anything sounds controversial, then I could refrain from saying it, as I told him my purpose to attend his synagouge was to grow in Judaism and join a diverse community.  I actually like the people who attend the synagogue and it for being so small has a very diverse ethnic makeup, including Bukharian, Yemenite, Mizrachi, Persian and Ashkenazi Jews.   However, I felt a sour feeling from the Rabbi and it makes me sad, but now I feel I should no longer attend his synagogue.    What upset me, was that I came to attend his Rosh Hashanna service and he just ignored me.  He saw me , looked at me , then looked the other way and walked by me.  Instead, he would greet all the other people next to me, saying "Shana Tova", but not me.  I felt hurt.   Then I called him to ask about Yom Kippur services, if I need to reserve a spot and which would be best to attend, since I live too far away from the synagogue to spend the entire day/night there.     He didn't bother calling me back.  I guess I got the message, that my kind isn't liked here.  I told him I am a Kahanist, ZIonist, Right-Wing on most issues, but I respect and love all Jewish people.  I also told him I Felt connected to the Mizrachi culture.  Maybe, this caused some dissension?   I just felt overall not liked by the Rabbi.

After doing some research about this Rabbi, I found out some disturbing news.  It turns out the Rabbi even writes on his Chabad page that his grandfather was the founder of Neturei Karta, the most diabolic and anti-Semitic groups to come into existence.  I dare not call them Jews.  On that note, I won't say the name of the grandfather, but anybody who wants to research the foundations of this organization will find out.    Of course, I know I cannot blame his grandfather for his actions, but why he boasts that he is his grandfather and calls him a "great Torah SCholar" on his web page baffles me.     

Also, I have started to question some ethics of Chabad as I keep attending.  The fact that they provide a place for Jews to worship without breaking the bank account is noble.  However, I have been hearing rumors of many Chabadniks being anti-Israel.    The Chabad rabbi I have had for a while I know is Zionistic and not anti-Israel.   However, I wonder about some of the others.  Note, the Zionist Chabad rabbi I am talking about is not the same rabbi who I believe does not like me.  This is another rabbi.   

Most Chabad rabbis including the one where I live, are Kahanists or at least sympathetic to Rabbi Kahane's zt'l teachings. But it has to be remembered that Chabad is a very large organization and like any large organization will have different factions. There are some factions that are much less Zionistic and even somewhat hostile to the Jewish state. Though because of the Rebbe this hostility is largely kept to themselves. It should also be remembered that following the Holocaust many Hasidim whose sects leadership had been wiped out by the Nazis joined Chabad. While they accepted the Rebbe's leadership many of them kept the anti-Zionist attitudes of their original Hasidic denomination.

Also, there seems to be a great love and appreciation for the blood-sucking Tzar of Russia.  I get tired of hearing some of rabbis talk about how great and G-d fearing was the Tzar.   After doing more historical research, I have found out that the founding fathers of the Chabad actually aided the Tzar in the battle against Napoleon and were major contributors to helping Russia in the victory, serving as spies and performing intelligence operations.  Did it matter that Napoleon respected the Jewish people and wanted to help them re-build the Temple in Jerusalem, whereas the Tzar would treat us like inferior rodents who murdered his g_d?  Did it matter that the Tzar would send his soldiers to our villages to steal our wealth, rape our women , murder and torture our people?  This is something you will not hear these Chabad rabbis ever speak about.  Instead, they like to boast about how the Tzar protected us and feared G-d.  It makes my blood boil.  I almost walked out of the Shabbat service one day after hearing it.     

The Tzar was not a good person, and he even had the first Rebbe of Chabad the Alter Rebbe imprisoned in horrifying conditions, though the Alter Rebbe was eventually released.

But Napoleon was a megalomaniac, he was incredibly hostile to Torah Judaism and even forced the Jews of France to create a farcical "Sanhedrin" to enact anti-Torah decrees. Chabad supported the best option they had at the time.

Also as rotten as the Tzars were, lets not forget how much worse the Bolsheviks were when they came to power. The Tzars harrased us, and made our lives hard, but the Communists tried to kill our souls and our bodies.

Then there is the issue with Messiah worship and teaching their kids Yiddish instead of Hebrew.  Some Chabad rabbis won't let their kids speak in Hebrew, except during prayer, and then only Ashkenazi Hebrew.

Well, I do keep all my criticisms of Chabad to myself.  But, I question the integrity of the organization at times.   I guess I wonder why the Rabbi doesn't like me?  Is it because I said I was a Kahanist?   He seem to get  disturbed when I told him I was a conservative and that I didn't care for the city I lived because of how liberal it is.  For example, the city near where I live has a high rate of homosexuality and voted 80% liberal.  You will see gay men walking down the streets kissing and holding hands.  I was hoping a Rabbi, a spiritual teacher, could be open to my thoughts and concerns.


Sorry, if I sound of a low spirit, cynical or depressed.  I have had not the happiest time where I Live.  I feel rather rejected by my own people and just like a lost sheep wandering in a valley of wolves.  I don't realy know where to go.  I am too right-wing, conservative for the reform synagogues, although after talking to some of them, they seem to be the most eager to welcome me, despite my lack of finances.  Sadly, most of them  will have female or homosexual rabbis and chazzans and I would not be able to stomach that, nor can I appreciate their new age and modernized style of worship.  I am a traditional person and dream of a traditional life with my Jewish spiritual family. 

I understand, it is often hard to find strong Rabbis who will stand up to the corruption so endemic to our society. I hope your situation improves and you work things out with the Rabbi at your shul.
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Re: Think A Local Chabad Rabbi Hates Me.. What about Chabad?
« Reply #8 on: September 16, 2013, 02:12:03 AM »
Thanks kahaneloyalist for sharing your opinions on the subject.  You have definitely opened my mind on some issues, including the whole issue about Napeleon and the Tzar. 

Well,  I did attend the Yom Kippur service at another Chabad, but not the one with the Rabbi I was talking about.  I would like to go back to this other Chabad because of its very diverse community.  The Chabad I attend is not diverse now, mostly blue collar American folks, as it represents the population of the city where the Chabad is located.  Most of the people there are friendly, but seem rather secular.  Some of the people also are a bit rough around the edges.  Like during Yom Kippur an argument broke out between Rabbi and one of members.     The other Chabad I am interested in has the very diverse and unique community.  Also, many of the members are Shomer and very strict in their Jewish way of life and culture.  For example, all the Bukharian members will not drive on Shabbat and walk to the kehillot.  There is also a Yemenite Jewish member who prays in his native Yemenite Jewish Hebrew which I find intriguing.

I will attend the next Shabbat service and go up to the Rabbi and ask if he wants me to continue to be a member.  Perhaps, I am reading  the Rabbi wrong and he is just overburdened and busy and cannot give me any attention.  I guess I just felt bad he seem to ignore me and also felt a little awkward with the Shabbat meal I had with him.

Personally, I am very attached to Mizrachi culture and wanted to attend a Yemenite or some type of Mizrachi synagogue, but no such things exist in the West Coast.  The Sefardic community where I live is extremely wealthy and in my opinion has become somewhat sterilized and absorbed into wealth and materialism.  Not that being productive and wealthy is wrong, but not at the cost of your culture and community . I was very disappointed at how people in the Sefardic synagogue had no connection with their Sefardic roots and that nobody could speak Ladino.  My own Ashkenazi brother can speak more Ladino than anybody at any of the Sefardi synagogues I visited.   

Outside of the Chassidim/Chabad, there is hardly any Jewish culture where I live.  Everything is quite secular and more pseudo-Judaic culture.  Even though Yiddish culture isn't  where I feel connected (despite being a Yiddish Jew, ethnically), I respect how Chassids/Chabadniks retain their cultural roots in an ever-increasing secular world. 

This may sound controversial, but I believe if it wasn't for Charedim or Chassidim in Israel, Jewish culture as we know it may cease to exist as secularism is wiping out most Jewish culture and replacing it with sterile modern culture.
Rabbi Kahane:  http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL76A7B68A01E5CACC

"To turn the other cheek is not a Jewish concept. Do not listen to the soothing anesthesia of the establishment. They walk in the paths of those whose timidity helped bury our brothers and sisters less than thirty years ago."

—Rabbi Meir Kahane, Jewish Defense League founder

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Re: Think A Local Chabad Rabbi Hates Me.. What about Chabad?
« Reply #9 on: September 16, 2013, 04:05:17 AM »
Don't take any if it personally. The rabbi doesn't hate you. He's been busy.
From the description I have to say '44 is likely right. That Rabbi blew him off very purposely. I wouldn't return to his synagogue. I also think to be proud of such an evil grandfather is very disturbing.

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Re: Think A Local Chabad Rabbi Hates Me.. What about Chabad?
« Reply #10 on: September 16, 2013, 04:26:47 AM »
Thanks kahaneloyalist for sharing your opinions on the subject.  You have definitely opened my mind on some issues, including the whole issue about Napeleon and the Tzar. 

Well,  I did attend the Yom Kippur service at another Chabad, but not the one with the Rabbi I was talking about.  I would like to go back to this other Chabad because of its very diverse community.  The Chabad I attend is not diverse now, mostly blue collar American folks, as it represents the population of the city where the Chabad is located.  Most of the people there are friendly, but seem rather secular.  Some of the people also are a bit rough around the edges.  Like during Yom Kippur an argument broke out between Rabbi and one of members.     The other Chabad I am interested in has the very diverse and unique community.  Also, many of the members are Shomer and very strict in their Jewish way of life and culture.  For example, all the Bukharian members will not drive on Shabbat and walk to the kehillot.  There is also a Yemenite Jewish member who prays in his native Yemenite Jewish Hebrew which I find intriguing.

I will attend the next Shabbat service and go up to the Rabbi and ask if he wants me to continue to be a member.  Perhaps, I am reading  the Rabbi wrong and he is just overburdened and busy and cannot give me any attention.  I guess I just felt bad he seem to ignore me and also felt a little awkward with the Shabbat meal I had with him.

Personally, I am very attached to Mizrachi culture and wanted to attend a Yemenite or some type of Mizrachi synagogue, but no such things exist in the West Coast.  The Sefardic community where I live is extremely wealthy and in my opinion has become somewhat sterilized and absorbed into wealth and materialism.  Not that being productive and wealthy is wrong, but not at the cost of your culture and community . I was very disappointed at how people in the Sefardic synagogue had no connection with their Sefardic roots and that nobody could speak Ladino.  My own Ashkenazi brother can speak more Ladino than anybody at any of the Sefardi synagogues I visited.   

Outside of the Chassidim/Chabad, there is hardly any Jewish culture where I live.  Everything is quite secular and more pseudo-Judaic culture.  Even though Yiddish culture isn't  where I feel connected (despite being a Yiddish Jew, ethnically), I respect how Chassids/Chabadniks retain their cultural roots in an ever-increasing secular world. 

This may sound controversial, but I believe if it wasn't for Charedim or Chassidim in Israel, Jewish culture as we know it may cease to exist as secularism is wiping out most Jewish culture and replacing it with sterile modern culture.

Rabbi Meir Kahane gave a whole speech about how Napoleon is the one who started the process of Jewish assimilation in Europe.
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Re: Think A Local Chabad Rabbi Hates Me.. What about Chabad?
« Reply #11 on: September 16, 2013, 05:10:06 AM »
From the description I have to say '44 is likely right. That Rabbi blew him off very purposely. I wouldn't return to his synagogue. I also think to be proud of such an evil grandfather is very disturbing.

I am hoping you are not right and that I am also misinterpreting the Rabbi's behavior towards me.  However, I am still thinking perhaps that the Rabbi does not want me to attend the synagogue for whatever reasons.   Yes, you are also correct in the fact that I believe this Rabbi seriously needs to give an explanation as to why he thinks the founder of such a horrific and anti-semitic organization is worthy of being called a " Great Torah Scholar".     There are a few other things about this Rabbi and the Chabad organization where I live that troubles me, but I will not discuss these on the forums.  They are a bit personal and I am willing to overlook them for now.



Rabbi Meir Kahane gave a whole speech about how Napoleon is the one who started the process of Jewish assimilation in Europe.

Perhaps we can truly blame Napoleon for the downfall of Jewish culture in Europe.  Although the Communists contributed their fair share in Eastern Europe. Considering, Jews were treated like slaves and inferior subhumans in most of Europe, it wasn't exactly like we were living well under any leader.   I am still disturbed and a bit disgusted at how some rabbis at the Chabad honor the Tzar in any way.  Yes, he may have not been as bad as the Bolsheviks, but he wasn't much better.  Treating us like slaves and cannon fodder for his wars, using our women as prostitutes and stealing our land and possessions  was not exactly a great life.  Sure, he would let us still practice Judaism, but the Bolesheviks would allow Jews to be equal among their ranks (if they renounced Judaism , of course).  The Tzar and most of Russian community believed we were "Christ killers" and were forever damned.   The mentality was not much different than that held by the Nazis who believed we were inferior and need punishment for murdering their g_d.   The Bolsheviks hated religion, period, but the Tzar hated "our" religion and hated us.    What can I say, hearing the Chabad rabbi calling the Tzar a "man of G-d" or a "G-d fearing man" just pisses me off.  It is an offense I am willing to overlook.   And, the chilling fact may be true, that the Tzar was the best option at the time.
Rabbi Kahane:  http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL76A7B68A01E5CACC

"To turn the other cheek is not a Jewish concept. Do not listen to the soothing anesthesia of the establishment. They walk in the paths of those whose timidity helped bury our brothers and sisters less than thirty years ago."

—Rabbi Meir Kahane, Jewish Defense League founder