Author Topic: Is there any jewish good omen number?  (Read 4725 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline ✡ Hindu Zionist ॐ

  • Honorable Winged Member
  • Master JTFer
  • *
  • Posts: 1643
  • India- Most pro-Israel country of the world!
Is there any jewish good omen number?
« on: February 11, 2010, 10:39:58 AM »
Do jews consider certain numbers to bring luck, or of good omen?

and i'm not talking about numerology. Just belief. Like say the number of verses in particular topic of torah, or number of letters in Gods name? For example we hindus consider 9,21,108.. so on to bring luck. In India many muslims believe the number 786 to bring fortune. most Christians consider number 13 to be unlucky.

I know Jews are only supposed to have faith in the Almightly, but then again, people in every culture try to use materialistic analogies to try and better their lifestyle, and come with new assumptions.

Offline muman613

  • Platinum JTF Member
  • **********
  • Posts: 29958
  • All souls praise Hashem, Hallelukah!
    • muman613 Torah Wisdom
Re: Is there any jewish good omen number?
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2010, 01:19:20 PM »
Every concept in Judaism has numeric value... It is a topic called Gematria. Various understandings of Torah can come through analysing the numeric values of words and comparing them to other words....

I will not reveal many of the sacred numbers because they represent the sacred names.

One commonly known # is 18, which is the numeric value of the word Chai which means life...

Often donations to Tzadakka is made in multiples of 18, like I recently donated $180 to Chabad {I pretty much always make $180 pledge to Chabad}...

http://www.jewfaq.org/signs.htm

Quote
Chai


This symbol, commonly seen on necklaces and other jewelry and ornaments, is simply the Hebrew word Chai (living), with the two Hebrew letters Cheit and Yod attached to each other. Some say it refers to the Living G-d; others say it simply reflects Judaism's focus on the importance of life. Whatever the reason, the concept of chai is important in Jewish culture. The typical Jewish toast is l'chayim (to life). Gifts to charity are routinely given in multiples of 18 (the numeric value of the word Chai).
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

Offline ✡ Hindu Zionist ॐ

  • Honorable Winged Member
  • Master JTFer
  • *
  • Posts: 1643
  • India- Most pro-Israel country of the world!
Re: Is there any jewish good omen number?
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2010, 07:06:07 AM »

Often donations to Tzadakka is made in multiples of 18, like I recently donated $180 to Chabad {I pretty much always make $180 pledge to Chabad}...

http://www.jewfaq.org/signs.htm
interesting, we too donate money to charity which equates to our lucky numbers..

also, if 7 considered as good too? I have read, there is a custom of winding the red string to the tomb of rachel 7 times?

Offline muman613

  • Platinum JTF Member
  • **********
  • Posts: 29958
  • All souls praise Hashem, Hallelukah!
    • muman613 Torah Wisdom
Re: Is there any jewish good omen number?
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2010, 10:25:29 AM »

Often donations to Tzadakka is made in multiples of 18, like I recently donated $180 to Chabad {I pretty much always make $180 pledge to Chabad}...

http://www.jewfaq.org/signs.htm
interesting, we too donate money to charity which equates to our lucky numbers..

also, if 7 considered as good too? I have read, there is a custom of winding the red string to the tomb of rachel 7 times?

Seven is a very special number in Judaism... "Remember the Seventh day and keep it holy...". Seven and multiples of seven are very significant.

Seven, in Kabbalah, is the number which represents all of physical nature. The number eight represents the supernatural...

http://www.askmoses.com/en/article/318,81250/What-is-special-about-the-number-seven.html
Quote
What is special about the number seven?

In Judaism we find the seven-day concept quite often. Think of the seven days of mourning, and the seven day rejoicing period following a wedding. The weekly cycle is known as the “seven days of building” –- this refers specifically to the creation of the world (“building-construction”) which took seven days (including the day of rest). The week is also known as the “seven days of the cycle.” This means that a certain cycle begins and ends each week. It is a fundamental cycle, since it is based on the very creation of the world. This cycle is ‘built in’ to the psyche of the world and its inhabitants.

It is for this reason, that when we need to mark something important, we do it over a seven-day period. When, G-d forbid, a family is mourning the loss of a loved one, they need to realize on Monday, that today’s Monday is different from last week’s Monday. On Tuesday they need to realize that it is not the same as last Tuesday, and so on, for an entire week. The same applies in joyous circumstances, at a wedding. We need to realize that life the way we knew it has changed (for the better!). We truly internalize this when it is emphasized for an entire "seven days of the cycle."

According to kabbalah (Jewish mysticism), G-d created the world with seven divine attributes. They are: Kindness, Severity, Harmony, Perseverance, Splendor, Attachment and Royalty. Accordingly, the entire creation is a reflection of these seven attributes.

http://www.aish.com/jl/m/48954461.html

Quote
An incredible tapestry of 7's has been woven into the creation. How many can you name?

In the beginning... G-d created 7's.

Oh sure, He created light and dark, the heavens and earth, too. But for reasons unknown to us, He seemed to have a special affinity for the number 7.

The fact that the Torah begins with a verse containing 7 words and 28 letters (divisible by 7) is hardly remarkable. But when placed within the context of the overwhelming number of associations in Judaism with '7', a fascinating tapestry begins to unfurl. Let's take a closer look at this phenomenon.

WHY "SHAVUOT?"

Every spring, Jews around the world celebrate the holiday of Shavuot --commemorating the most seminal event in the history of mankind, G-d's revelation at Mount Sinai.

Shavuot. Curious name for this holiday, no? Shavuot means "weeks," underscoring the 7-week period between Passover and Shavuot in which we count each day (and week) in anticipation and preparation for re-living the Sinai revelation. But why call it Shavuot -- "weeks"? Why not call the holiday "Torah," or "Sinai," or "Commandments," or "Tablets." Of what significance is "Weeks"?

Time contains many different entities. Nearly all of them are related to natural phenomena. Days, nights, months, seasons and years are all directly determined, in some way, by the constellations. There is one exception -- the week. The formulation of a week seems to be totally arbitrary. Who needs it? Let one day just follow the previous one. And why 7 days?

The concept of a week and its constitution of 7 days is one that is strictly G-d-invented and human-adopted. While we may quibble about creation -- how, when, by whom, why -- the world has consensually agreed to the concept of a week. The Beatles were wrong... there are only 7 days in a week. And whenever a week is completed it is yet another reminder to mankind (or should be) that G-d created the world in 7 days. (Only 6 days were required to manufacture the physical structures, but the process was not complete until the spiritual realm, Shabbat, was added.)

Call it the "week link."

WHY "7"?

Kabbalah teaches that 7 represents wholeness and completion. After 7 days, the world was complete. There are 6 directions in our world: north, south, east, west, up and down. Add to that the place where you are, and you have a total of 7 points of reference.

Shavuot, marking the emergence of the Jewish people into a nation, by virtue of their receiving and accepting the Torah, also marks a completion. Perhaps that is why the holiday is called Shavuot, "Weeks." We want to identify this holiday as a completion of the process of Jewish nationhood.

No one is certain why G-d chose the number "7" to signify completion. All we can do is speculate, observe and marvel.

In honor of our own completion of the 49 day period leading up to Shavuot, we present 49 allusions to the number "7" within Judaism. How many of these do you recognize? How many more can you add?

THE MAGNIFICENT SEVENS!

   1. Shabbat is the 7th day of the week.
   2. There are 7 weeks in the counting of the Omer before Shavuot. (Leviticus 23:15)
   3. In Israel, there are 7 days of Passover and Sukkot. (Leviticus 23:6, 34)
   4. Every 7th year, the land lays fallow during Shmita (Sabbatical year). (Leviticus 25:4)
   5. After 7 cycles of Shmita, we have a Jubilee year (Yovel). (Leviticus 25:8)
   6. When a close relative dies, we sit Shiva for 7 days.
   7. On Sukkot we shake 7 species - 1 Lulav, 1 Esrog, 2 willows, and 3 myrtles.
   8. Yitro, the first real convert to Judaism, had 7 different names, and 7 daughters (one who married Moses).
   9. Moses was born and died on the same day - the 7th of Adar.
  10. Our Sukkah huts are "visited" by 7 guests - Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Moses, Aaron, Joseph and David.
  11. The Menorah in the Temple had 7 branches.
  12. Achashvarosh, King of Persia during the miracle of Purim, held a party for 7 days. (Esther 1:5)
  13. There are 7 holidays in the Jewish year: Rosh Hashana, Yom Kippur, Sukkot, Chanukah, Purim, Passover, and Shavuot.
  14. In addition to the 613 Commandments, the Sages added 7 more.
  15. There are 7 Noachide Laws pertaining to all humanity.
  16. At every Jewish wedding, 7 blessings are recited (Sheva Brachot).
  17. Each Shabbat, 7 people are called to the Torah reading (Aliyot).
  18. The first verse in the Torah contains 7 words (and 28 letters).
  19. Our Matriarch Leah had 7 children - six sons and one daughter.
  20. There were 7 days of preparation for the construction of the Tabernacle in the desert. (Leviticus 8:35)
  21. Traditionally, the bride circles the groom 7 times under the Chuppah (wedding canopy).
  22. We wind the Tefillin straps around the arm 7 times.
  23. Moses was the 7th generation after Abraham.
  24. Each plague in Egypt lasted 7 days.
  25. In Pharaoh's dreams there were 7 cows and 7 stalks of grain. (Genesis 41)
  26. The Biblical contamination period typically lasts 7 days. (Leviticus 13:4)
  27. G-d created 7 levels of heaven. (Hence the expression, "I'm in 7th heaven!")
  28. On Shabbat and holidays, we recite 7 blessings in the silent Amidah.
  29. There are 7 special species of produce by which the Land of Israel is praised: wheat, barley, grapes, pomegranates, figs, olives, and dates. (Deut. 8:8)
  30. The world has 7 continents.
  31. The 7 weeks of the Omer correspond to the 7 "sefirot," the 7 behavior traits in which we serve G-d: kindness, strength, beauty, triumph, splendor, foundation, and kingship.
  32. Noah sent the dove and the raven out of the Ark for 7 days to inspect the weather conditions. (Genesis 8:10)
  33. 7 nations warred with Israel: Canaanites, Hittites, Hivites, Amorites, Perizzites, Jebusites, and Girgashites.
  34. On Yom Kippur, the High Priest sprinkled the blood in the Temple 7 times. (Leviticus 16)
  35. The Jewish New Year of Rosh Hashana occurs, surprisingly, in the 7th month -- Tishrei. (Leviticus 23:24)
  36. The Jewish calendar, largely lunar, has a cycle of intercalation that contains 7 leap years during each 19-year period.
  37. There are 7 notes on the musical scale.
  38. A Kohen (priest) should participate in the burial of 7 relatives: father, mother, sister, brother, son, daughter, and spouse. (Leviticus 21:2)
  39. We dance 7 circles (hakafot) on the holiday of Simchat Torah.
  40. The smallest allowable dimension of a Sukkah is 7 cubits by 7 cubits.
  41. The world has 7 seas.
  42. Joshua led the Jewish People around the walls of Jericho 7 times before the walls fell. (Joshua 6:15)
  43. Jacob worked for Laban for 7 years (twice) in order to marry his daughters. (Genesis 29:27)
  44. The Holy Temple contained 7 gates of entry.
  45. We recite 7 blessings every day before and after the "Shema" -- 3 in the morning and 4 at night.
  46. The Talmud lists 7 female prophets: Sarah, Miriam, Deborah, Hannah, Avigail, Chuldah, and Esther.
  47. A Jewish servant regains freedom after working for 7 years. (Exodus 21:2)
  48. We conclude our Yom Kippur prayers by proclaiming7 times, "The Lord is G-d!"
  49. A Jewish wedding is followed by 7 days of celebration (Sheva Brachot).
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

Offline muman613

  • Platinum JTF Member
  • **********
  • Posts: 29958
  • All souls praise Hashem, Hallelukah!
    • muman613 Torah Wisdom
Re: Is there any jewish good omen number?
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2010, 11:31:14 AM »
And concerning the number Eight, which as I said represents the supernatural:

http://www.torahweb.org/torah/2007/Parasha/rwil_beshalach.html

Quote
Finally, the medrash (Vayikra Rabba 21:5) says that Aharon enters the Kodesh Kodoshim b’zos, in the merit of mila described (Breishis 17:10) as “zos brisi”. The Kodesh Kodoshim is a completely spiritual place. Only one who rises above nature through bris mila can enter there. The Maharal adds that the world was created in seven days. Since seven represents nature, eight is supernatural. The eight days of Chanuka and the eight garments of the Kohein Gadol reflect this theme as well.

http://www.askmoses.com/en/article/113,2259974/Why-is-a-child-circumcised-on-the-eighth-day-of-his-life.html

Quote
5. The Chassidic masters explain that seven represents natural order (seven days of the week, seven years in a sabbatical, and seven Sefirot), eight represents the supernatural (one above seven/nature). The Brit is on the eighth day because it forms a supernatural and supra-rational covenant between the Jew and G-d.

And is it a coincidence that the symbol for infinity happens to be an eight on its side:

You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

Offline Ari Ben-Canaan

  • Master JTFer
  • ******
  • Posts: 2284
  • "The Necromancers Could Not Stand Before Moses."
Re: Is there any jewish good omen number?
« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2010, 01:22:01 PM »
"539" spells out, J-E-W, on a telephone. :dance:
"You must keep the arab under your boot or he will be at your throat" -Unknown

"When we tell the Arab, ‘Come, I want to help you and see to your needs,’ he doesn’t look at us like gentlemen. He sees weakness and then the wolf shows what he can do.” - Maimonides

 “I am all peace, but when I speak, they are for war.” -Psalms 120:7

"The difference between a Jewish liberal and a Jewish conservative is that when a Jewish liberal walks out of the Holocaust Museum, he feels, "This shows why we need to have more tolerance and multiculturalism." The Jewish conservative feels, "We should have killed a lot more Nazis, and sooner."" - Philip Klein

Offline muman613

  • Platinum JTF Member
  • **********
  • Posts: 29958
  • All souls praise Hashem, Hallelukah!
    • muman613 Torah Wisdom
Re: Is there any jewish good omen number?
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2010, 01:23:54 PM »
"539" spells out, J-E-W, on a telephone. :dance:

And what is so special about that #?

You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

Offline ✡ Hindu Zionist ॐ

  • Honorable Winged Member
  • Master JTFer
  • *
  • Posts: 1643
  • India- Most pro-Israel country of the world!
Re: Is there any jewish good omen number?
« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2010, 01:25:19 PM »
fascinating! i will try to use those math to my advantage where possible

Offline muman613

  • Platinum JTF Member
  • **********
  • Posts: 29958
  • All souls praise Hashem, Hallelukah!
    • muman613 Torah Wisdom
Re: Is there any jewish good omen number?
« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2010, 01:28:33 PM »
HZ,

I was thinking about this topic while driving into work this morning... I want to remind you that Jews don't believe in the concept of luck. A Jew is taught to believe that everything happens for a reason and nobody is lucky or unlucky, but they receive exactly what Hashem wants them to receive.

We do have the concept of Mazal, which means flow from the heavens. This is the power which nature, the stars and the planets, have on us... It is common to hear Jews wish each other "Mazel Tov" which means "Good Mazal"...

So in a sense I am not discussing 'lucky numbers' but numbers which have special significance...

http://www.chabad.org/search/keyword_cdo/kid/11010/jewish/Mazal.htm
http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/160965/jewish/What-Does-Mazel-Tov-Mean.htm

Quote
Question:

I always thought Mazel Tov meant "congratulations." I recently heard that it actually means "good luck." But I thought Jews don't believe in luck...?

Answer:

Your confusion is understandable. The Talmud--the ancient encyclopedia of Jewish wisdom--seems to contradict itself on the issue. In one place it states, "On your birthday, your mazel is strong." Elsewhere the Talmud reports, "The Jewish people are not subject to mazel"!

The word mazel literally means "a drip from above." Mazel can have different connotations depending on its context, but they are all connected to this basic definition--something trickling down from above.

The signs of the zodiac are called mazalot. Jewish tradition sees the constellations on high as directing the destiny of individuals and nations down below. Thus mazel is the influence dripping down from the stars. (Over the years, bad or good mazel came to mean luck more than destiny.) When the Talmud says that we are not subject to mazel, it means that we are not limited to our destiny; rather our own actions determine our fate.

There is another meaning of the word mazel that is more relevant to the phrase Mazel Tov. Mazel is the term used in Jewish mysticism to describe the root of the soul. The mystics say that only a ray of our soul actually inhabits our body. The main part of the soul, our mazel, remains above, shining down on us from a distance.

Have you ever experienced a sense of spontaneous intuition, where out of the blue you suddenly feel at peace with yourself and the universe? Or a sudden flash of inspiration that makes you see life in a new light? Occasionally we may receive an extra flux of energy from our soul above. It can happen at any time, but is most common at a time of celebration-–a birth, birthday, bris, bar/bat mitzvah or wedding. It is especially at these times of joy that we are able to see beyond the mundane and the petty and sense the deeper truths of life.

When we tell someone Mazel Tov, we are giving them a blessing: May this drip of inspiration from your soul above not dissipate, but rather have a positive and lasting effect, that from this event onwards you should live your life with higher consciousness. You should be aware of the blessings in your life and be ready to receive more and more.

In other words: Good Mazel!

You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

Offline Ari Ben-Canaan

  • Master JTFer
  • ******
  • Posts: 2284
  • "The Necromancers Could Not Stand Before Moses."
Re: Is there any jewish good omen number?
« Reply #9 on: February 13, 2010, 07:59:13 PM »
"539" spells out, J-E-W, on a telephone. :dance:

And what is so special about that #?



Easy way to spot out another Jew, incognito style. :)

Sorta like your 613... to many people its just a number, for us its the number of mitzvoth.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2010, 08:05:35 PM by Ariel Shayn »
"You must keep the arab under your boot or he will be at your throat" -Unknown

"When we tell the Arab, ‘Come, I want to help you and see to your needs,’ he doesn’t look at us like gentlemen. He sees weakness and then the wolf shows what he can do.” - Maimonides

 “I am all peace, but when I speak, they are for war.” -Psalms 120:7

"The difference between a Jewish liberal and a Jewish conservative is that when a Jewish liberal walks out of the Holocaust Museum, he feels, "This shows why we need to have more tolerance and multiculturalism." The Jewish conservative feels, "We should have killed a lot more Nazis, and sooner."" - Philip Klein

Offline muman613

  • Platinum JTF Member
  • **********
  • Posts: 29958
  • All souls praise Hashem, Hallelukah!
    • muman613 Torah Wisdom
Re: Is there any jewish good omen number?
« Reply #10 on: February 13, 2010, 09:56:26 PM »
"539" spells out, J-E-W, on a telephone. :dance:

And what is so special about that #?



Easy way to spot out another Jew, incognito style. :)

Sorta like your 613... to many people its just a number, for us its the number of mitzvoth.

Yes, I like to link the 613 mitzvot to my name... To remind myself of the commandments, as I remember when I see my tzittzits.

248 Positive Mitzvot + 365 Negative Mitzvot
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

Offline Ari Ben-Canaan

  • Master JTFer
  • ******
  • Posts: 2284
  • "The Necromancers Could Not Stand Before Moses."
Re: Is there any jewish good omen number?
« Reply #11 on: February 14, 2010, 07:44:39 PM »
"539" spells out, J-E-W, on a telephone. :dance:

And what is so special about that #?



Easy way to spot out another Jew, incognito style. :)

Sorta like your 613... to many people its just a number, for us its the number of mitzvoth.

Yes, I like to link the 613 mitzvot to my name... To remind myself of the commandments, as I remember when I see my tzittzits.

248 Positive Mitzvot + 365 Negative Mitzvot



I laughed at this. :)
"You must keep the arab under your boot or he will be at your throat" -Unknown

"When we tell the Arab, ‘Come, I want to help you and see to your needs,’ he doesn’t look at us like gentlemen. He sees weakness and then the wolf shows what he can do.” - Maimonides

 “I am all peace, but when I speak, they are for war.” -Psalms 120:7

"The difference between a Jewish liberal and a Jewish conservative is that when a Jewish liberal walks out of the Holocaust Museum, he feels, "This shows why we need to have more tolerance and multiculturalism." The Jewish conservative feels, "We should have killed a lot more Nazis, and sooner."" - Philip Klein

Offline Zelhar

  • Honorable Winged Member
  • Gold Star JTF Member
  • *
  • Posts: 10451
Re: Is there any jewish good omen number?
« Reply #12 on: February 15, 2010, 12:06:24 PM »
"539" spells out, J-E-W, on a telephone. :dance:

And what is so special about that #?



Easy way to spot out another Jew, incognito style. :)

Sorta like your 613... to many people its just a number, for us its the number of mitzvoth.

Yes, I like to link the 613 mitzvot to my name... To remind myself of the commandments, as I remember when I see my tzittzits.

248 Positive Mitzvot + 365 Negative Mitzvot

248 equals to number of organs in the human body, 365 equals to the number of ‎Tendons in the human body, according to Chazal's counting.

Offline ✡ Hindu Zionist ॐ

  • Honorable Winged Member
  • Master JTFer
  • *
  • Posts: 1643
  • India- Most pro-Israel country of the world!
Re: Is there any jewish good omen number?
« Reply #13 on: February 15, 2010, 01:01:00 PM »
thanks for the information muman, now i know why we have a member with username "Gimatria", also better understanding of "Mazel Tov"