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Offline Ephraim Ben Noach

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Self Defence
« on: January 02, 2012, 10:33:17 PM »



If any of the JTF members find this interesting I will post more of this type of stuff!
Ezekiel 33:6 But if the watchman see the sword come, and blow not the horn, and the people be not warned, and the sword do come, and take any person from among them, he is taken away in his iniquity, but his blood will I require at the watchman's hand.

Offline Ephraim Ben Noach

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Re: Self Defence
« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2012, 11:24:19 AM »
http://www.karatebreaking.com/karatemethod.html
 *Remember, training is not recommended at all for those under 16 years of age. Those individuals under 18 years of age must get permission from a parent or guardian before starting training. Always consult a physician before beginning any exercise program. Train at your own risk. These training methods only reflect personal experience, and Wesler's Karate, Inc. cannot be held responsible for any injury resulting from attempting to train in these techniques.*
The karate (Japanese) method of training the hand is the most common type of hand conditioning. It is found in most hard styles of karate and crosses over into tae kwon do, which is extremely popular and accessible in my area. This is the kind of conditioning to which I was first introduced.
Karate conditioning focuses primarily on the use of the makiwara. Makiwara come in various sizes and shapes, but basically consist of a slightly flexible wood post wrapped with rope. The makiwara is struck repeatedly with increasing intensity, resulting in toughened, calloused hands and enlarged (calcified) knuckles. Seiken (forefist) and tegatana (knifehand) are the two primary techniques, but any surface such as palm heel, elbow, knees, and kicks may be used.
You can make a simple makiwara by digging a 1'x 3' hole in the ground, filling it with quick dry cement, and planting a 4"x 4" wooden post in it. The post should stand at least head high. Straw was traditionally used for its rumored antiseptic properties, but in this modern age, cotton clothesline will do fine. Wrap a double layer (or more) of the clothesline around the target portion of the makiwara (shoulder height).
Wall mounted makiwara are available at martial art stores, but they are often too padded and soft for proper training.
A hand held makiwara is also suitable and can be made by wrapping clothesline around a 14" section of 1"x 2" wooden plank.
Training on the makiwara is fairly basic, simply hit the post as many times and as often as you can withstand without injury. If you suffer a bruise or break in the skin, you should hold off training until the wound is healed.
You can also supplement your training by striking into a bucket filled with sand.
Liniment is often neglected in this form of training, but some karatekas do employ the use of dit da jow
 liniment. In my opinion, a good dit da jow should always be used before, during, and after training to prevent injury and discourage the development of arthritis down the road. Find a dit da jow that works well for you. The effects will vary depending on your personal physiology.
Makiwara should be trained daily, but there is no strict set regimen. The key is not hitting the makiwara so hard that you hurt yourself, but repetition and consistency.
The down sides are a tendency to neglect training due to the lack of schedule, conditioning only selected surfaces of the hand, possible slow to medium progression, and extensive callousing and/or scarring of the hand as well as an eventual possible loss of dexterity.
However, hand held makiwara can be very convenient to carry with you and use all day long. Makiwara trained hands are rather noticeable and can be ugly (though I personally find them quite beautiful in their deadliness, but that's my problem). If you like to show off, they are a sure sign of dedicated training in the old ways.
Mas Oyama
 (known, at times, as the Godhand), founder of Kyokushin Kai and world famous for his tameshiwari skill, developed knuckles on the makiwara that could withstand the blow of a hammer. He was best known for fighting bulls and severing their horns with his fearsome knifehand.
Ezekiel 33:6 But if the watchman see the sword come, and blow not the horn, and the people be not warned, and the sword do come, and take any person from among them, he is taken away in his iniquity, but his blood will I require at the watchman's hand.

Offline Ephraim Ben Noach

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Re: Self Defence
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2012, 11:41:34 AM »
Ezekiel 33:6 But if the watchman see the sword come, and blow not the horn, and the people be not warned, and the sword do come, and take any person from among them, he is taken away in his iniquity, but his blood will I require at the watchman's hand.

Offline Ephraim Ben Noach

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Re: Self Defence
« Reply #3 on: January 03, 2012, 01:07:27 PM »
Weapons of the body!
 http://andrebertel.blogspot.com/2010/11/weapons-of-body.html
 http://www.sheffieldkungfu.com/4207/natural-kung-fu-weapons-of-the-body/
 http://www.muaythaistuff.com/learn-muay-thai/basic_techniques/
 Shaolin Kung Fu: Natural Weapons of the Upper Body!
September 6, 2011 by Sifu Peter Allsop
   
Filed under Shaolin External Kung Fu and Wu Shu

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There is no such thing as defenceless person. Everyone, irrespective of age and gender has a range of natural weapons to employ. Modern social contexts, however, overflow with labour-saving devices and tools which perform tasks for us, so these weapons are rarely employed. The end result is that many people have forgotten that these natural weapons exist, let alone how to use them–this article is intended as a brief reminder.

The Sharp-Pointed Elbow-- One of The Upper Body''s Most Effective Natural Weapons!
Lower Edge of the Hand
Kung Fu’s famous ‘chop’ requires stiffened fingers held closely together with thumb folded into the palm (to prevent injury). Keep the wrist rigid and use the entire arm to strike using the elbow as a pivot.
The impact area extends from the bottom of the hand to the base of the little-finger (and is one of the toughest places on the body). Striking the lower edges of both hands together repeatedly is a good basic training exercise for the ‘chop’.
Palm Heel
Keep your fingers tightly together with thumb folded into your palm. Fold your fingers back and keep your hand tense and strike upwards into the face.
The Shoulders
Your own personal battering-rams! Striking adversaries front-on will wind them and leave them unable to continue. Shoulder-strikes to the back can temporarily paralyse opponents and knock them to the ground–better still, look for a convenient wall and shoulder them into it!
Fingers and Thumbs
Used like pincers to grab opponents shoulder muscles, this can bring good results. Grab the jugular vein or carotid artery similarly and your opponent will soon be unconscious. Jabbing both thumbs into an opponent’s neck causes intense pain and breathlessness.
The Teeth
These should never be discounted as weapons: the sharp-pointed canines can tear and rip and the incisors can grip whatever they close on as firmly and strongly as a pair of pliers.
The Fist
Close your fingers at the first knuckle, then close them again at the second knuckle and lock them into place with your thumb (this should cover the first two fingers). Keep your fist tightly clenched and your wrist stiff and in line with the back of the hand when punching.
The top of your fist is the ‘fist-eye’ the bottom the ‘fist-wheel’ (close investigation will confirm these likenesses). Use these for upward and downward hammer-blows and the knuckles for frontal attacks and back-fists.
The Elbows
Your sharp-pointed, bony elbows have high power-to-weight ratio and ‘suprise attack’ potential. Driven into the face,’Longfist’ style they emay cause tremndous damage to an opponent’s teeth, nose and jaw. Similarly, broken ribs may ensue from strikes to the rib-cage.
The Fore-arm
This can act as a powerful shield protecting you from attacks, deflecting incoming blows and kicks and off-balancing or injuring your opponent at the same time (a good block has ended many fights). The fore-arm can also be smashed into an assailant’s face or body.
The Head
The head is a powerful weapon and can be used to attack the face or torso of an opponent. Be carefull though and watch your balance!
The body’s natural weapons are referred to by the Chinese as the Qi Xing (Seven Stars). This article has considered those located above the waist–a subsequent article will deal with those located below.
Sifu Peter Allsop M.Ed.is Shaolin Fists International Area Kung Fu Instructor for Yorkshire and Derbyshire, and U.K (North) Instructor for 5 Elements/HYL Energiser Qigong.
The Fitness Club, Surrey St. (next to the Winter Gardens, opposite Tudor Square):
Wednesdays and Thursdays 7:30-9:00pm;
Saturdays 3:00-5:00pm.
Area Classes Chesterfield:
Fitness First, Sheffield Rd (opposite Chesterfield FC Stadium):
Sundays 4:00-5:30pm & Tuesdays 8:00-9:30pm.
Ezekiel 33:6 But if the watchman see the sword come, and blow not the horn, and the people be not warned, and the sword do come, and take any person from among them, he is taken away in his iniquity, but his blood will I require at the watchman's hand.

Offline Ephraim Ben Noach

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Re: Self Defence
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2012, 10:30:11 PM »

We must remember that a block is not only a block but also a strike! And to make our enemy pay for trying to attack us!
Ezekiel 33:6 But if the watchman see the sword come, and blow not the horn, and the people be not warned, and the sword do come, and take any person from among them, he is taken away in his iniquity, but his blood will I require at the watchman's hand.

Offline mord

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Re: Self Defence
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2012, 10:58:22 AM »
Actually many people start at age 3
Thy destroyers and they that make thee waste shall go forth of thee.  Isaiah 49:17

 
Shot at 2010-01-03

Offline Ephraim Ben Noach

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Re: Self Defence
« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2012, 11:55:00 AM »
Mord If you are implying that you started training at age 3? you should definitely add some content. this should be for everyone from expert to beginner. we can always share ideas together. my cup is always empty.
Ezekiel 33:6 But if the watchman see the sword come, and blow not the horn, and the people be not warned, and the sword do come, and take any person from among them, he is taken away in his iniquity, but his blood will I require at the watchman's hand.

Offline Ephraim Ben Noach

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Re: Self Defence
« Reply #7 on: January 04, 2012, 11:56:51 AM »
http://www.your-krav-maga-expert.com/krav-maga-history.html
 Krav Maga History
"*Next Tour and Train 
June 11 - 20, 2012*"**
Krav Maga literally means "Combat – Contact" or "Close Quarter Combat".
Krav Maga has no single "founder" and no official beginning. It is the product of the needs of the times and the efforts of many instructors over the years, each adding and modifying based on his skills and experience.

The roots of modern Krav Maga began with the need for self-defense in the land of Israel. The Jews living here were regarded as weak and helpless. They were considered fair targets by Bedouin Arabs and other Muslims who did not care for them.
The Arabs did not respect weakness and refereed to the Jews as "Walid el mita" - The child of death. Jewish blood was considered cheap. The Jews lived in their own quarters, scared and at the mercy of others. Often they hired Arabs to protect them.
The Jews emigrating to Israel from around the world, coming home to their ancestor homeland, found this situation shocking, intolerable and unacceptable. They began to "adjust" to the Middle East.




In 1903 the Maccabi Union was formed to teach Jews physical fitness and strength. They wanted to end the era of "Walid el mita". They soon began training with sticks (early Kapap) but the goal was rifles, live weapons.

In 1907 a group was formed called "HaShomer" - The Guard, with the purpose of defending Jewish settlements. From this point, and even before this, is a constant exploration and evolution of hand-to-hand self defense techniques and strategies. This process continues even today.


In 1919 Ze'ev Jabotinsky founded the "Haganah" - Defense, for the purpose of defending Jews against the increasing Arab attacks.
Various instructors are instrumental in developing what would become known as Kapap and eventually Krav Maga.
In January 1941 a self-defense course takes place, the chief instructors are Maishel Horowitz, Menashe Harel, Gershon Kofler, and Yitzhak Shtibel. This is a key point in the organized development of Israeli self-defense.


In Czechoslovakia in the 1930's Imi Lichtenfeld, an expert in boxing and wrestling, together with other Jews forms a Jewish self-defense group. He was influenced by his father, Shmuel, a detective and Defensive Tactics instructor with the local police force. Shmuel Lichtenfeld was known as a tough officer with a reputation for arresting the most violent criminals.

Young Imi grew up in a tough area and had to deal with fascist thugs, violent gangs and anti Semites. On the street he learned to distinguish between sporting techniques and real life self defense.
Imi Lichtenfeld began to incorporate techniques from different styles to form an effective approach to self defense to enable the Jewish community to defend itself against Fascist militias.
When Europe became unbearable for Jews, Imi left. He eventually ended up in the Land of Israel in 1942, then controlled by the British. Israeli self-defense was already well in the process of development, he joined this on-going process.

"*Learn authentic, evolving, Krav Maga on line*" Krav Maga On line program

"*Krav Maga DVD's from Israel*"**
Israeli Krav Maga DVD's


"Early Krav Maga training"

He joined the "Hagana" (Defense, in Hebrew) the defensive force founded by the legendary leader Ze'ev (Vladimir) Jabotinsky in 1919 for the purpose of defending Jewish settlements from Arabs.

Jabotinsky was one of the great Jewish leaders of that century. He foresaw doom for European Jewry and urged them to relocate to the Land of Israel ("aliya"). He founded the Betar youth movement and the Herut (Freedom) political party. Future Prime ministers Menachem Begin and Yitzchak Shamir were among his disciples.

Jabotinsky, or Jabo as he was known by the Jewish masses, was not only a great leader and speaker, he was also a writer and a poet. He wrote in many languages; text books on Hebrew language, novels , and poems
 . His works inspired his generation and the those that followed. One of his most famous articles was, "Jews; Learn to Shoot!" Jabotinsky formed the Zion Mule Corps as part of the British army in World War One, and he himself enlisted as a private.

While Jabotinsky was the philosophical force behind Jewish military revival, others were the hands-on Krav Maga Instructors.

Lichtenfeld's talents were noticed and he was assigned to join the unarmed combat instructors team. Eventually he became a Kapap instructor and was among those who trained the Palmach and Palyam. He is credited with a shifting of emphasis from use of the stick to the greater incorporation of Jujitsu.
When Israel became a state in 1948 all the pre-state militias joined together to form the IDF. Imi was recruited into the staff of the IDF physical training school were he was one of 11 Kapap instructor.



Krav Maga includes techniques form judo, jujitsu, karate, Western Boxing and elements of wrestling. With the establishment of the State of Israel Krav Maga was adopted as the official fighting style of the Israel Defense Forces and the Israel Police Force.
In 1964 Lichtenfeld retired from the IDF and opened a private Krav Maga club. With this he becomes the first to offer Krav Maga to civilians, although in Israel nearly all civilians serve in the military and thus already have some Krav Maga training. His fame comes from his initiation of the development of Civilian Krav Maga. This is a process still going on today with many branches.
Krav Maga is free flowing; all styles of punching, kicking, chokes, take-downs are employed with the aim of neutralizing the enemy in the shortest amount of time possible.
Unlike competitive martial arts, where limits are placed on the type of techniques used or the areas targeted, Krav Maga has no limitations. Groin shots, eyes, throat, face, are all fair game. Therefore Krav Maga does not hold competitions and does not seek to be represented in the olympics
 . The danger to the participants would simply be too great.
Krav Maga is designed for self-defense, combat, and worst case scenarios. A major part of the training involves the ability to handle such stressful situations, both physically and mentally.
The style is easy to learn and apply. Krav Maga chooses simple movements that are natural to the body, based on instincts that are already established within us.
Perhaps the most unique aspect of Krav Maga is the emphasis on aggressiveness, sticking to the goal
 no matter what, even when it is hard, even when you feel you have nothing left, and a no compromising attitude towards the enemy. Our goal is to neutralize the enemy; the specific technique does not matter.

Krav Maga is taught to all units of the Israel Defense Forces
 , the amount depends upon the unit. As such nearly everyone in Israel has some Krav Maga training. Depending on the unit, knife and gun disarms are also taught. All training involves strict discipline, aggressiveness and a warrior mindset.
For the relationship between Krav Maga, Kapap and Lotar see Israeli Martial Arts
 .

Learn about warfare in the days of the Bible; Biblical Warfare


Read interview with Israeli historain Noah Gross, about the early years of Krav Maga and Kapap
Ezekiel 33:6 But if the watchman see the sword come, and blow not the horn, and the people be not warned, and the sword do come, and take any person from among them, he is taken away in his iniquity, but his blood will I require at the watchman's hand.

Offline mord

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Re: Self Defence
« Reply #8 on: January 04, 2012, 11:58:56 AM »
Mord If you are implying that you started training at age 3? you should definitely add some content. this should be for everyone from expert to beginner. we can always share ideas together. my cup is always empty.
No i started at age 5 my nephew started at age 3. Me at ACK. My nephew at  Kyokushin Karate
Thy destroyers and they that make thee waste shall go forth of thee.  Isaiah 49:17

 
Shot at 2010-01-03

Offline Ephraim Ben Noach

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Re: Self Defence
« Reply #9 on: January 04, 2012, 02:40:56 PM »
No i started at age 5 my nephew started at age 3. Me at ACK. My nephew at  Kyokushin Karate
ACK is that Kenpo if so did you like the 3rd vid on the 1st post?
Ezekiel 33:6 But if the watchman see the sword come, and blow not the horn, and the people be not warned, and the sword do come, and take any person from among them, he is taken away in his iniquity, but his blood will I require at the watchman's hand.

Offline Ephraim Ben Noach

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Re: Self Defence
« Reply #10 on: January 04, 2012, 10:19:49 PM »
http://www.theshotokanway.com/ashisabaki.html
 
 
 
 
 
   
     
   Ashi Sabaki or Unsoku – footwork

 

Footwork in karate is considered an operational technique, since its purpose is to shift for distance or/and to produce momentum force to the technique, it allows us to be in the right time in the right space. Its purpose is to allow us to apply the necessary technique, avoid attack or for strategy.

 

Footwork or shifting should be smooth, sharp, without back motion. We say that the footwork should be hidden, so as the feet move underneath the body and the torso should not show any change.

 

Traditionally, the kata do not emphasize foot work, and so is karate as practiced in Okinawa, there was emphasize on using the stance, but not smooth shifting.

 

Mostly, our footwork training comes from Japanese Budo, as karate came to Japan and kumite training became more integral part of training, footwork training was emphasized more. Any strong technique is useless if it cannot be applied in proper timing and distance.

 

The stance while moving with the opponent is different than the stance of technique execution, it should be higher, almost like natural everyday life walking, so it is easy to control the legs from the core muscles, and we are more mobile.

 

At impact we prefer a deeper stance for strong base to deliver force from.

Whenever we react to the opponent the breath and feet should move first, never the extremities or top technique, even when we react in place, it’s the breath and feet that initiate ground reaction and technique as a chain from the ground up.

 

Fundamentals-

 

Ukimi- suspension, floating

 

While shifting, the body center should suspend the legs; it should feel as if the legs are hanging from the body center and are free.

 

The muscles of the pelvic floor, lower abdominals, buttocks and inner thighs should be active in suspending the legs; it should feel as if those muscles are drawing the legs gently into the body’s center.

 

It should feel as if there is no weight on the feet, yet the toes should have a strong feel in them, which help connecting the abdominals and feet.

 

Try to feel extension through the spine all the way through the cervical spine, which help keeping all the joints free.

 

The breath has to be from the abdomen, if the breath is from the chest, it is impossible for the body center to control the legs.

 

Zui Ban- accompany movement

 

The body center moves and the legs cooperate, the legs movement is function of the center and spine, so the legs (hip, knee and ankle joints are free) are soft and do not make isolated effort (to be able to apply accompany movement, the concept of ukimi has to be build in the nervous system, and the legs have to have a slight squeeze to each other, so the legs work as a unit with each other and with the body center).

 

The body center is the base from which the legs are moving from, it has to be stable and moves only as much as it needs to.

 

Sometimes, Sensei Nishiyama goes so far as saying to move only from internal force (the body center), not to worry about using the legs and ground reaction, and the purpose of this is so one does not over use the legs, making a back motion. This is OK providing one has already established the best angles between legs to torso and to ground, and the breath connects to back leg, and is proficient enough, so he will use the ground following these instructions, but not overuse.

 

Good indication of someone overusing the legs is stamping the floor and loud footwork; the feet should glide on the ground, as if there is no weight on the feet.

 

One should feel as if walking on thin ice without breaking it.

 

Body weight between feet-

 

Because the pressure can be applied to either foot by using the breath, to produce ground reaction force, if the weight shift over one leg, then we are more likely to float, and even if we could apply pressure to floor, the angle of the ground reaction force is not to the line of the technique.

 

Itsuku – being glued, stuck, stiff

 

This is obviously a condition to avoid; the legs get stiff, heavy, and not responsive. Usually when we judge too hard, when the breath stops or rises. Even when we are not moving the breath has to interact with the feet, and there must be potential energy.

 

 

Types of shifting-
 

Yori ashi (slide) or Okuri (send) Ashi

 

This is the most common shifting method, and quickest for short space, but relatively not as smooth as Ayumi or Sugi Ashi.

Using the concept of Zui Ban, front foot moves first (controlled from body center by breath), then body center, then technique, one after another – all together.

 

The reason we move the foot first and not the body center is that it take more energy, meaning more time to move more mass like the body center.

 

At the end everything stops and focuses together, only the sequence is important to make more a quicker start and acceleration.

 

In reality, the body center moves first and the leg and foot extends the center, only that relatively in space the foot is faster, the movement of the sacrum and thigh bone, shin bone and foot have to match.

 

We say that front foot moves and than back foot push, rather than back leg push in order to move, since that might result in back motion.

 

The back foot pushes only for an instant and immediately follows and stays united with the body and front foot. The moment the front foot touches the floor and receives pressure by the breath and momentum, there is reaction to the back foot. Pressure returns to back foot, which supports the present technique and produce potential energy, loading for the next technique.

 

If the back foot drags behind, it becomes an obstacle, like an anchor that pulls opposite direction of the technique, there is no loading, and there is stress on many joints throughout the kinetic chain.

 

Ayumi Ashi- walking

 

This is a way to get quickly and smoothly into the opponent’s space, it should feel as if riding on wind.

 

Using the concept of Zui Ban, the center moves and the legs accompany, feel as if the legs hanging freely from the center.

 

Differently than regular walking, the toes lead and touch the floor first, rather than the heels, since it is faster.

 

The knees are slightly bent and the stance is not too deep, like in natural stance, Sensei Nishiyama says to think as if you are sneaking in.

 

At any instant either foot can apply pressure to ground to initiate a technique.

When walking into opponent’s space, estimate before moving in, once moving in don’t hesitate or stop, your footwork should never stop until catching the opponent, you might attack directly, or switch rhythm with breath and feet, or use sasoi, invite by fake, or switch feet (kae ashi) to catch and mix the opponent’s rhythm, but you should never stop and stall, or hesitate or stop your breath or feet, what we called Itsku (glued, stiff feet).

 

Sugi Ashi- shuffle
 

Like chain reaction, the back foot advance, as much as the needed space (sometimes half step, and other times crossing the front foot), and when it touches the ground, reaction goes to the front, advancing foot, the body stays sideway (hanmi) while the back foot advances.

 

This is a good way to cover more distance smoothly, and it has use many times within combinations or by itself, only it is dangerous to use if the opponent is not off rhythm and behind since while the back foot moves we don’t have good loading. Again the concept of Zui ban is applied

 

Kae Ashi- switch legs
 

As the legs are suspended and are hanging from the center, the body center being stable base, moves the legs underneath, the legs are switching to catch the opponent’s rhythm while adjusting the space for a kick or other technique.

 

The legs can be switched to break and mix up the opponent’s rhythm and once he is behind attack him.

 

The point is that while the legs are being switched underneath the body, either leg is free to apply pressure to ground (from the center) to initiate technique while adjusting the space or to initiate kick by lever action from the body center.

 

This means that while the legs are free, the body center can apply two opposing energy direction to either leg, one leg can be lifted from the body center while the other receive pressure to use ground reaction to initiate a technique.

 

As in any other footwork, the torso should not show any change. 

 

Mawashi Ashi- Circle

 

Using rotational action from the spine, the legs express this rotation and moves in a circle to avoid the opponent’s line of attack.

 

The space between the feet should be as small as possible to shorten the moment arm while rotating. When counter attacking it is OK to have a wider space for a strong base at impact and to increase the angular momentum, which makes it easier to decelerate.

When left leg is forward and right foot moves to left this is Kawashi (switch), and is done without shifting the center as possible, when right foot moves to the right, we use the rotation energy to shift the center of mass (it is a more energy efficient way to shift, and more speed can be achieved), but again the shift should be minimal, only enough to avoid the line of attack.

More shifting than necessary means time and we might miss the space that is given while the opponent attacks, but also may give the opponent time and action space for follow attack.

 

One other way to shift to the right is called Hiraki Ashi (to open the feet), which means to shift the right foot to the right by suspending it from the center, not by rotation, this is less preferable, since it opens us more for the opponent’s continue attack.

 

When responding to opponent with Mawashi Ashi, Keep your low abdomen close to opponent, as if you dance with him and receive him/her with your stomach, and in line with that, react with your breath and center rather than with your eyes and brain, become the opponent rather than fight him.

 

Mawashi Ashi can be done while responding with Sen timing, catching the opponent in one timing, while he is attacking, doing Sen while switching (Kawashi) off the line of attack is called Nuke Waza.
   
     
   
 
 

Ezekiel 33:6 But if the watchman see the sword come, and blow not the horn, and the people be not warned, and the sword do come, and take any person from among them, he is taken away in his iniquity, but his blood will I require at the watchman's hand.

Offline Ephraim Ben Noach

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Re: Self Defence
« Reply #11 on: January 04, 2012, 10:28:56 PM »
http://www.usadojo.com/styles/about-shaolin-white-crane-kung-fu.htm
Shaolin White Crane Kung Fu is a rare system of self-defense which combines foot techniques, hand techniques and chin na (seizing and controlling). Although rare in the western world, the art is a famous fighting style in Southeast Asia. In fact, it is widely considered to be one of the ancestors of several traditional Okinawan Karate systems. It uses hands, feet, knees, elbows, shoulders and hips in its arsenal of striking techniques. The style is renowned, however, for its rapid hand techniques, its strikes executed in conjunction with grabs and its devastatingly effective pressure point attacks.

The founder of the style, Fang Chi-Niang, was a petite woman who lived in violent times. Most men were comparatively larger and more physically powerful than her. Moreover, body conditioning was, at the time, a much more important part of Kung Fu training than it is today. Enormous time and effort went into strengthening the arms, legs, torso, and even the skull. Fang Chi-Niang reasoned that certain vulnerable areas of the body could not be hardened or conditioned to resist injury. Powerful strikes to the temples, eyes, throat, solar plexus, floating ribs, kidneys, groin, knees, etc., could successfully debilitate even the most determined attacker. Consequently, attacking pressure point targets with specialized hand strikes became a trademark of White Crane.

White Crane combines defense and attack and uses both soft and hard power. It also emphasizes a firm yet evasive footwork. Shaolin White Crane Kung Fu stresses empty hand as well as weapons training, two-person sets, self-defense drills and free sparring. The style's fierce pressure point attacks combined with rapid footwork and no nonsense approach make it a particularly effective, complete, and beautiful martial art.

Fighting Strategy
The Fung Ying Chuan (Phoenix eye fist) is the basic White Crane fist technique. It is named for the slightly protruding index finger which resembles the eye of the legendary Phoenix. It is most useful for pressure point attacks, since it concentrates one's entire power in a very small area, namely the second joint of the index finger. This means that power is extremely focused and that it tends to penetrate deeply. Although it is necessary to practice specific hand and finger strengthening exercises to effectively use the Phoenix eye fist, it is nevertheless considered a relatively easy technique to master. A second commonly used hand formation is Biao so, or Spear Hand. It is formed by completely straightening the fingers and thumb and keeping them held tightly against each other. It is used exclusively against the body's weakest points, such as the eyes, throat or groin. Further hand formation used in Flying Crane include: edge of hand strikes, crane, eagle, tiger, and dragon claws. Most other hand movements either mimic a crane's wings or resemble classical Southern Kung Fu systems hand techniques.

A good White Crane fighter can, amongst other things, sidestep and strike an opponent. This tactic is very effective in self-defense scenarios against a completely committed and possibly enraged adversary. It was not designed for the often tentative, forewarned and illusory nature of controlled sparring involving mutually consenting competitors. This brings us to a most important point: Authentic Chinese martial arts were created and evolved to be devastating self-defense systems. As society changes and evolves, however, many martial art systems have changed their fundamental nature and modified their training regimen. We can safely distinguish between those arts that have remained faithful to their tradition of all-or-nothing self-defense and those that have become martial sports. Both have something very special to offer to the public. There is, however, a great difference in approach.

I believe that most traditional Chinese martial arts focus upon forms, two-person exercises, weapon sets, body conditioning, internal exercises and free fighting. It is, in fact, quite a perversion of reality to suggest that traditional martial arts overemphasize forms training. After all, it is modern Wushu and other performance arts that do so.7 Traditional systems emphasize applications (Yong Fa). To do so, they must study a wide spectrum of subjects related to combat. They need to have a holistic approach to martial arts. This determined and comprehensive study of combat is what we call Kung Fu.

Training Methodology
A unique feature of the White Crane system is the manner in which the many empty-hand and weapon forms are designed. The forms are comparatively short, and many of them are designed to be done as fighting sets with a partner. That is to say, the various blocks, counter-strikes, and joint locks in the second half of a given form make up the correct response to the various moves of the first half. Thus, one can familiarize oneself with the movements in solitary practice, and then test one's understanding in a controlled-contact environment with a partner. This system ensures an organized approach to mastery of not only the individual movements, but also the fighting theory and real-world application of the form.

The same two-person set fighting paradigm is used for many of the weapons forms,8 beginning with White Crane's famed Seven Star Staff (Chi Sing Guen). Along with the spear (Chiang), three-sectional staff (San jie guen), halberd or General Kwan's Broadsword (Kwan Dao), cane (Gwaijian), Horse Cutter Broadsword (Jam Ma Dao), and the tiger fork (Fu Cha), there are several double weapons in traditional White Crane. These include the double iron rods (Swan jien) which are similar to Japanese sai, the double broadswords (Bai Her Dao), and the southern short swords (Nan Dao). Single weapons include: Single Broadsword (Dao), Straight sword (Dsien) and Fan (San Tse). There are over 80 empty hand forms in the Flying Crane style. Some are very short, others rather long. There are also a great many weapons forms.

Besides forms and two-person sets, students also condition their bodies and practice striking various training equipment. Several sensitivity or listening drills are also emphasized. For example, students often pair up and extend their arms so as to make them touch. From this position, they practice attacks and counter-attacks. Regular practice of this listening hands drill permits students to feel their opponent's intentions and act accordingly. It also provides a safe and realistic forum from which to practice the application of their techniques. Free sparring is also introduced early on and is emphasized according to the individual's wants, desires and skill level. Finally, advanced breathing exercises are taught on a one-on-one basis due to their nature.

History of Shaolin White Crane Kung fu
Before proceeding further, it is important to explain to readers that there are actually two martial art systems emanating from China that bear the name of White Crane: one originates in Tibet and the other in the southern coastal province of Fukien. Both arts are famous and have glorious histories of their own. This fact is mentioned in order to avoid confusing the public.

The history of the Fukienese White Crane Kung Fu has been passed down from master to student (father to son) for five generations. Although various accounts do exist, they all tell a similar tale. The history of White Crane Kung Fu as passed down within the Lee family is presented below.1

Fang Chi-Niang was born in Lei Chow Fu in the middle of the 18th century. Her father's name was Fang Hui Sz and her mother's name was Lee Pik Liung. Fang Hui Sz studied Kung Fu in the Shaolin temple at Nine Lotus Mountain, Ching Chiang district, Fukien (modern day Fujian) province. His wife and daughter lived at Lei Chow Fu. Since they were victimized by local landlords, it was decided to move away from the village. Eventually, they settled down in Ching Chu temple, on Ching Chea Mountain (Lei Chow Fu). One day, as Fang Chi-Niang was drying grain in front of the temple, she saw a huge crane come down from the roof and begin to eat. She decided to use a bamboo stick to chase away the intruder. Fang Chi-Niang was both curious and fearful of the crane. At first, she tried to strike its head but the bird was evasive. Then she attempted to hit the crane's wings but it stepped to the side and used its claw to block the attack. When Fang Chi-Niang tried to poke the bird's body with her staff, it moved back and used its beak to peck the bamboo. Fang Chi-Niang was surprised. She continued to use the techniques her father had taught her but her efforts were completely unsuccessful. Astonished by the crane's skill, Fang Chi-Niang sought to practice with it on a daily basis. Fortunately, the crane obliged. This permitted Fang Chi-Niang to analyze and absorb the bird's self-defense strategies. Eventually, she mastered the movements and spirit of the crane.2

During this period, Emperor Chien Lung ordered the destruction of the Southern Shaolin temple after having been informed of revolutionary activities on its grounds. Fang Hui-Sz was one of the few fortunate ones to escape the attack. He sought out his wife and daughter and they initially settled at Pik Chui Liang. Subsequently, Fang Hui-Sz moved to Sah Liang temple near Foochow, where he spent his spare time refining his daughter's Shaolin Kung Fu. Fang Chi-Niang eventually mastered everything her father could teach her and chose to combine the crane's spirit and movements with her Shaolin Kung Fu. She taught Kung Fu at Sah Liang temple to Weng Wing-Seng, Lee Fah-Sieng, Chang The-Cheng, and Ling Te-Sun. Weng was from Lei Chow Fu, Lee was from Chow Ann district, Chang was from Wing Chun district, and Ling was from Foochow. Weng and Lee taught many students at Kao Pei Cliff and set up a school there. Chang (nicknamed Nine Dots monk) settled at the White Crane temple and taught martial arts. Ling's descendants moved to Taiwan. Lee passed his skills to his son Lee Mah-Saw. Lee Mah-Saw continued to set up schools and taught in Chow Ann district. Fang Chi-Niang's teachings gave birth to different interpretations and four principal styles were developed: Flying Crane (Fei He), Eating Crane (Shi He) Screaming Crane (Ming He) and Sleeping Crane (Jan He or Su He). Later on, variations and combinations with other systems occurred which led to the creation of even more types of Fukienese White Crane.

At this point, it may be useful to debate whether the Fukienese White Crane arts are truly Shaolin systems or whether they represent a separate school. Since they were created outside the temple, many older generation White Crane masters do not consider their art to be a Shaolin art. This belief is compounded by the fact that White Crane focuses heavily upon soft power in the advanced stages. On the other hand, the founder did study from her father who was an accomplished Southern Shaolin practitioner. Consequently, it is difficult to resolve the debate as it is largely a question of perspective. Perhaps it is best to acknowledge the root of the art while simultaneously recognizing the founder's unique contributions.

Grand-Master Lee Kiang-Ke: Bringing White Crane into the 20th Century
Historically, with the end of feudal social systems and the widespread use of firearms, advanced methods of combat are no longer an every day necessity. This fact of life, combined with the traditionally secretive nature of kung fu instruction, is contributing to the loss of an irreplaceable part of China's cultural heritage. Many of the hundreds of different styles of kung fu are in danger of being lost or diluted to the point of extinction.

For practitioners of Fukien-style White Crane Kung Fu, the life of Grandmaster Lee Kiang-Ke (1903-1992) represents both a link to the past and window toward the future. To properly understand the reverence a martial artist has for his or her Grandmaster, it is necessary to view the martial art in its proper historical and cultural context. One important difference between the martial arts and other forms of physical activity is that martial arts can be practiced and enjoyed for a lifetime, and progress can be made at virtually any age. As such, many older masters are considered living treasures, due to the decades of accumulated knowledge, experience, and teaching expertise that they possess. Today, fewer and fewer people are willing to devote their lives to the study and teaching of martial arts as was done in the past. Because of this unfortunate reality, priceless martial knowledge often disappears forever upon the death of an elderly Grandmaster. This is especially true in the many styles of Chinese martial arts, where kung fu Shifus were secretive about their personal fighting art, and unwilling to disseminate it indiscriminately.

Fukien ShaolinWhite Crane Kung Fu is continuing to thrive, thanks to the enlightened thinking of one of its foremost proponents. Third-generation Grand-Master Lee Kiang-Ke was the single most influential person responsible for the preservation and dissemination of the flying crane system of Fukien White Crane. His choice to open to the public what had previously been a closed-door system ensured the survival of a most complete and devastating Chinese martial art system.

Grandmaster Lee Kiang-Ke started to learn Kung Fu from his father at the age of seven. After 10 years of arduous training, his father sent him away to live at a temple (Bai He An) where he furthered his martial knowledge under the instruction of a temple monk known as "Nine-dots Monk." This temple specialized in the instruction of Fang Chi-Niang's White Crane techniques. After four years of intensive study, the young master returned home to assist his father in teaching White Crane and in practicing herbal medicine. In time, he became the chief instructor and medical practitioner in his community. Later on, the Kuomintang (Chinese Nationalist government) invited him to join the 49th Army Division as a medic. He ended up also teaching the soldiers the long handled broadsword (Da dao).

When his time of service was completed, he returned home and continued teaching martial arts and practicing medicine. Thereafter, Lee Kiang-Ke moved to Singapore where he stayed for six years. In an effort to escape the Japanese invasion forces, he then moved to Kuching, East Malaysia. Unfortunately, the Japanese invaded Malaysia soon after. Following the war, fellow martial artists invited him to open a club. He did so and named it the "Martial Heroes Association" (Woo Ing Tong)3. It prospered for many years. During this period, Malaysian society was quite rough-and-tumble. Polite tests of skill were fairly common. Less friendly challenges and outright life and death self-defense situations also occurred. Master Lee was famous amongst his peers for never losing a challenge.4 In 1963, he moved to the city of Sibu (also in the East Malaysian state of Sarawak). Eventually, he directed several schools in local communities including Kuching, Sibu, Sarikei, and Bintulu.

In 1967, the first South East Asian Kung Fu Tournament was held in Singapore. Lee Kiang-Ke's Kung Fu brother, Lee Wen-Hung, came from China and competed. Lee Wen-Hung had studied with Lee Kiang-Ke under Lee Mah-Saw. Despite his somewhat advanced age, he won first place in combat. He then he settled in Singapore. In 1973, a White Crane student representing Sarawak (East Malaysia) went to compete in the third South East Asian Kung Fu Tournament where he won second place in combat.

Grandmaster Lee Kiang Ke retired in 1978 leaving his son, Shifu Lee Joo-Chian, the leadership of the head school in Sibu, East Malaysia. Master Lee Joo-Chian's own training reveals the hard work needed to acquire some real skill (Kung Fu). Like his father, he started training at the age of seven. Classes were generally two and a half hours long. As the climate is hot and humid, warming up time was very brief. Students practiced forms for a half hour without any break. Thereafter, they briefly rested and recommenced their training of forms and basic moves for another half hour. Two-person forms were then practiced for another half hour followed by conditioning drills or weapons training. Finally, the last half hour was reserved for free sparring practice. The young Lee Joo Chian followed this grueling schedule three times a day, six days per week! Morning class was at 4.30 A.M. Then the children went off to school. Upon his return, Lee Joo Chian helped teach the afternoon class. Around eight in the evening, Lee and his sisters trained once again. Master Lee likes to remind people that there was little television in those days.5

Benefits of Training
Shifu Bernard believes it is a regrettable fact that many young people no longer engage in regular exercise. It is perhaps no accident that some of the most common ailments of modern life include back pain, hypertension, high stress levels, and insomnia, all conditions that exercise has been proven to alleviate. Training in a traditional Kung Fu school permits people to train their minds and bodies, develop real self-defense skills and preserve some link to martial tradition, folklore and culture. Furthermore, the confidence one gains from knowing real self-defense skill filters through all aspects of that person's life thereby providing access to a more relaxed and pleasurable lifestyle.

Making a habit of regular exercise can be a difficult task. A learning activity like Shaolin White Crane Kung Fu, in which there are always new skills to master, can prevent boredom from setting in. Furthermore, in this age of short-lived trends, some fads don't even last long enough to prove their long-term value or even their safety. The roots of Kung Fu go back over a thousand years, and many instructors retain a high level of fitness into their sixties, seventies, and even eighties. They are living proof that Kung Fu movements, when properly practiced, are at the very least, safe, and most likely, highly beneficial.

Fukien Shaolin White Crane Kung Fu today
Although the Flying Crane style is relatively rare, it and other Fukienese Kung Fu styles have made their influence known in other ways. For example, the link between Fukienese Kung Fu and Okinawan Karate is undeniable. It is also known that in the late nineteenth century, the founder of Goju Ryu Karate came to Foochow, in Fukien province, and studied several styles including White Crane and southern Praying Mantis.

One of the foremost proponents of the system in North America is Shifu Lorne Bernard, based in Montreal. He began his studies with a student of Grandmaster Lee, Shifu Augustine Ngu, who immigrated to Canada in 1977. Shifu Ngu now operates a large Kung Fu academy in Mississauga, Ontario. Shifu Bernard travels to Malaysia on a regular basis to learn from the various White Crane masters both in and out of the Lee family. He has also arranged for the system's present leader, Shifu Lee Joo Chian, to travel to Canada and teach for an extended period of time on several occasions. Access to such highly skilled practitioners permitted Shifu Bernard to gain a deep understanding of the theories and finer points within the art.

In addition to teaching at two schools in the Montreal region, Shifu Bernard has arranged for White Crane to be taught at two major universities in Montreal (Concordia University and Univerité du Québec à Montréal). Shifu Bernard has also trained several instructors, thus ensuring the continued growth and expansion of the White Crane system. A good teacher, in any field, understands that the vitality of a teaching institution can be gauged by the quality of its students. As such, a skilled martial arts instructor takes pride in helping students achieve new heights of proficiency.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1 This account was given to Shifu Lorne Bernard by Grandmaster Lee Kiang-Ke during his first trip to the Orient in 1989. There are several accounts of the origins of Fukien White Crane Kung Fu. Fortunately, they are all quite similar in that they generally refer to the incident with the crane, and the fact that Fang Chi-Niang eventually became extremely skilled in martial arts.

2 It is noteworthy that in Grand-Master Lee's account, the crane was interpreted as being the personification of a god descended from the heavens and determined to teach Fang Chi-Niang martial arts.

3 It is noteworthy that the name "Wu Ing Tong" was actually the original name of one of the Lee family's Herbal stores in Chow An, Fukien province.

4 His prowess was generally explained by his incredible speed of execution.

5 This is his subtle way of criticizing those who waste countless hours fixed at the television screen.

6 Furthermore I would argue that some of the supposedly combat-oriented "no-nonsense" systems are guilty of underemphasizing forms practice.

7 Wushu literally means martial arts. Chinese martial arts have also been referred to by many other names including Guo shu, Chuan shu, Kung fu and Chuan Tao to name a few. Many family styles will refer to their art as Chuan Tao. Although the use of the term "Wushu" is actually correct, its use in the Western world is undermined by the fact that it is too closely associated with the contemporary martial arts being promulgated by the mainland Chinese government.

8 Some people may question the validity of training so many varied weapons in the modern age. Shifu Bernard always point out that if one is familiar with so many weapons, then anything in that person's reach can be skillfully used in self-defense. He also points out the many other values of traditional weapons training including: better understanding of footwork patterns, of the finality of strikes, cardiovascular and strength training, etc. Besides, most students focus on a few weapons as they may not have the time that professionals have.
Ezekiel 33:6 But if the watchman see the sword come, and blow not the horn, and the people be not warned, and the sword do come, and take any person from among them, he is taken away in his iniquity, but his blood will I require at the watchman's hand.

Offline Ephraim Ben Noach

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Re: Self Defence
« Reply #12 on: January 06, 2012, 10:13:37 PM »
Dr. Yang Jwing Ming is one of my favorite artists and authors. He has many great books and dvds. He is really good at explaining eastern science in a western way. You can generate great power from his teachings.



Ezekiel 33:6 But if the watchman see the sword come, and blow not the horn, and the people be not warned, and the sword do come, and take any person from among them, he is taken away in his iniquity, but his blood will I require at the watchman's hand.

Offline Ephraim Ben Noach

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Re: Self Defence
« Reply #13 on: January 07, 2012, 11:13:29 PM »




http://www.kajukenboinfo.com/handstrikes.html

Kajukenbo' Devastating Hand Strikes
by John Bishop (Black Belt, Dec. 94)


Fierce, brutal, overkill, street effective. These and many other such terms have been used to describe kajukenbo. Kajukenbo gained it's reputation for being brutally effective decades ago in the U.S. Territory of Hawaii. Since then it's eclectic use of five martial arts, and it's no-nonsense approach to self defense has contributed to it's strong reputation as an highly effective self defense system.

Kajukenbo' Origin
Kajukenbo is a prime example of American ingenuity. It is also America's first martial art system, having been founded in 1949 in the U.S. Territory of Hawaii. One of kajukenbo's leading instructor's is Gary Forbach from San Clemente, California. According to him kajukenbo's inception came about in 1947 when five Hawaiian martial arts masters calling themselves the "Black Belt Society" started on a project to develop a comprehensive self defense system. These five men of vision were Peter Choo, the Hawaii welterweight boxing champion, and a Tang Soo Do black belt. Frank Ordonez, a Sekeino Jujitsu black belt. Joe Holck, a Kodokan Judo black belt. Clarence Chang, a master of Sil-lum Pai kung fu. And Adriano D. Emperado, a Chinese Kenpo black belt, and Escrima master.

Together these men trained for several hours a day taking advantage of each others strengths and weaknesses to develop their new art. When Joe Holck and Peter Choo would spar Holck could see his weaknesses in striking techniques, and Choo would realize his vulnerability once he was on the ground. Emperado was able to show Choo how a kenpo man could work inside a kicker with rapid fire hand techniques. Chang in turn showed the others how the circular, flowing techniques of Sil-lum Pai were used to evade and strike. And Frank Ordonez showed everyone how to go with an attackers force and then re-direct it against him with painful locks and throws.

After it was decided that kenpo would be the base to build on, it was a long three year process incorporating the tang soo do kicks, jujitsu joint locks, judo throws, and sil-lum pai circular techniques into a complete system. Now all the system needed was a name. Joe Holck suggested that the name should be "Kajukenbo", ka for karate, ju for judo and jujitsu, ken for kenpo, and bo for Chinese boxing (kung fu).

Today kajukenbo is practiced all over the world. The chief organization for kajukenbo being the "International Kajukenbo Association", based in Oakland, California. Kajukenbo Hand Strikes
Kajukenbo utilizes rapid fire hand strikes and low kicks. These hand strikes came from Adriano Emperado's vast knowledge of Chinese Kenpo and Escrima. Along with these two systems he studied thousands of martial arts technique's and different types of movement. He used physical principles to analyze existing hand techniques and develop new ones. One of the basic physical principles that Emperado used was the rule that for "for every action there is a equal and positive reaction". When applied to the martial arts this principle means that when struck, the body will react to the strike in a certain way. Forbach feels that this is very important to the kajukenbo stylist since he utilizes multiple hand strikes in rapid succession. "We have all seen demonstrations done by martial artists who have tremendous hand speed.

Unfortunately in the case of some, when you break down their strikes you realize that half of them would not have been effective or even hit their desired targets. Just being able to strike several times rapidly is useless if your strikes do not hit your intended targets." Before one concentrates on developing hand speed he has to learn how the body reacts to strikes to different areas. As an example: If your first strike was a reverse punch to the stomach it would not be effective to target the face with a follow up back fist strike. If done properly the first strike to the stomach would cause the body to double over. In this position the attacker's face would be bent over towards the ground.

As a result the face is not at an angle to be targeted with a back fist strike. A more effective way to target the stomach and face would be to reverse the sequence of strikes. If the first strike is the back fist to the face the attacker's body would react by having his head thrust backwards. This reaction in turn would cause the stomach to be positioned and exposed for the follow up reverse punch.

When attempting multiple hand strikes Forbach feels that target acquisition is critical. "This is where one has to have an exceptional understanding of body movement. Thankfully Professor Emperado saved kajukenbo stylist thousands of hours of evaluation, analyzation, and trial and error. The martial art system that he developed utilizes a myriad of effective self defense combinations. These combinations are taught progressively to all kajukenbo students as they advance thru the ranks".

Developing Hand Speed
Most people are as fast as they will ever be. Repetition training can increase speed somewhat, but other factors such as "flow" and "economy of motion" can have a greater influence on the speed of combination techniques.

Because kajukenbo employs both circular and linear hand strikes it lends itself well to flowing movement. When hand techniques flow they follow a natural path of movement. Instead of throwing separate strikes, strikes are thrown and then without pause redirected into other strikes. As an example; if you were to strike the side of the neck with a knife hand strike, instead of retracting the hand you would redirect the knife hand strike straight down to the groin. The groin strike can then be redirected back up to a uppercut punch to the face.

Economy of motion is used to increase hand speed by reducing the distance that the hand has to travel when striking. A simple example would be the jab or back fist strike versus the reverse punch. Because the jab or back fist is much closer to the target it gets there faster. Of course there is a tradeoff. A technique like the reverse punch is more powerful because it covers a longer distance and employs more muscle groups than the back fist or jab. But to achieve the greatest possible speed one should utilize economy of motion in delivering multiple strikes. To develop increased power behind these shorter techniques body mechanics have to come into play. The use of the hips and shoulders to put more momentum behind short techniques greatly increases their striking power. Increased power can also be achieved by dropping body weight into downward strikes and lifting with the legs when striking upwards.

When it comes to selecting hand strikes, again you need to consider flow and economy of motion. Circular techniques such as knife hand chops can be quickly redirected into snapping techniques like back fist strikes. Open hand strikes like knife hand chops, rakes, pokes, and palm heel strikes tend to be faster because of the relaxed state of the arm muscles when the fist is not clenched.

Thrusting techniques like straight punches are more powerful, but slower to redirect. So when striking multiple times it makes good sense to hold back your thrusting punch and use it as a finishing technique. In Conclusion
Anyone can achieve effective, rapid, multiple hand strikes. First you have to learn body reactions. Second, you need to understand flow and economy of motion. Third, you need to understand which techniques flow best together. And finally you need to do hours and hours of repetition training to develop your speed.

Even for highly experienced martial artists, training in kajukenbo will greatly enhance your hand striking skills and save you a lot of trial and error.

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Ezekiel 33:6 But if the watchman see the sword come, and blow not the horn, and the people be not warned, and the sword do come, and take any person from among them, he is taken away in his iniquity, but his blood will I require at the watchman's hand.

Offline mord

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Re: Self Defence
« Reply #14 on: January 09, 2012, 07:41:13 AM »
ACK is that Kenpo if so did you like the 3rd vid on the 1st post?
No not really here is all about it's composed of many styles i just you'll have to go back to beginning to really understand itI'm only on this page because i wanted to see what happened to a certain person.I found out and i have to laugh some of the posters are lying 

http://www.martialtalk.com/forum/showthread.php?721-Richard-Barathy-American-Combat-Karate/page6
Thy destroyers and they that make thee waste shall go forth of thee.  Isaiah 49:17

 
Shot at 2010-01-03

Offline mord

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Re: Self Defence
« Reply #15 on: January 09, 2012, 08:15:03 AM »
No not really here is all about it's composed of many styles i just you'll have to go back to beginning to really understand itI'm only on this page because i wanted to see what happened to a certain person.I found out and i have to laugh some of the posters are lying 

http://www.martialtalk.com/forum/showthread.php?721-Richard-Barathy-American-Combat-Karate/page6
This was my kyoshi for 10 yrs   


Thy destroyers and they that make thee waste shall go forth of thee.  Isaiah 49:17

 
Shot at 2010-01-03

Offline mord

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Re: Self Defence
« Reply #16 on: January 09, 2012, 08:24:16 AM »



If any of the JTF members find this interesting I will post more of this type of stuff!
The last video of Hawaiian Karate i know about and interested in it seems to have some similarities to Barathy's ACK
Thy destroyers and they that make thee waste shall go forth of thee.  Isaiah 49:17

 
Shot at 2010-01-03

Offline Ephraim Ben Noach

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Re: Self Defence
« Reply #17 on: January 09, 2012, 02:56:00 PM »
This was my kyoshi for 10 yrs   



Wow Mord that is awesome that you got to study under a legend  like that! The last post I put up was more of that hawaiian style except for the Kenpo but it is part of it. I will pm you tonight.
Ezekiel 33:6 But if the watchman see the sword come, and blow not the horn, and the people be not warned, and the sword do come, and take any person from among them, he is taken away in his iniquity, but his blood will I require at the watchman's hand.

Offline mord

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Re: Self Defence
« Reply #18 on: January 09, 2012, 03:35:05 PM »
Very good
Thy destroyers and they that make thee waste shall go forth of thee.  Isaiah 49:17

 
Shot at 2010-01-03

Offline mord

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Re: Self Defence
« Reply #19 on: January 09, 2012, 04:32:02 PM »
If i go to Israel i would like to study with Dennis Hanover .Despite people talking about krav maga on the video it's not krav maga it's not a fighting system it martial arts  

 





http://www.shoshindo.dk/About-Academy/Legends/Dennis-Hanover   





http://www.imahof.co.il/dennis%20hanover.htm
« Last Edit: January 09, 2012, 04:37:36 PM by mord »
Thy destroyers and they that make thee waste shall go forth of thee.  Isaiah 49:17

 
Shot at 2010-01-03

Offline Ephraim Ben Noach

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Re: Self Defence
« Reply #20 on: January 10, 2012, 10:14:42 PM »
If i go to Israel i would like to study with Dennis Hanover .Despite people talking about krav maga on the video it's not krav maga it's not a fighting system it martial arts  

 





http://www.shoshindo.dk/About-Academy/Legends/Dennis-Hanover   





http://www.imahof.co.il/dennis%20hanover.htm
I hope you get to go to Israel, and get a chance to study with Hanover. He seems to be a great artist! Can I go? lol!
Ezekiel 33:6 But if the watchman see the sword come, and blow not the horn, and the people be not warned, and the sword do come, and take any person from among them, he is taken away in his iniquity, but his blood will I require at the watchman's hand.

Offline Ephraim Ben Noach

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Re: Self Defence
« Reply #21 on: January 10, 2012, 10:26:13 PM »
http://www.hwarangdo.com/hrdbooks.htm
The top book is the one I was talking about, but here is a bunch.
Ezekiel 33:6 But if the watchman see the sword come, and blow not the horn, and the people be not warned, and the sword do come, and take any person from among them, he is taken away in his iniquity, but his blood will I require at the watchman's hand.

Offline Ephraim Ben Noach

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Re: Self Defence
« Reply #22 on: January 10, 2012, 10:56:54 PM »
http://www.raynerslanetkd.com/HaeSul/HaeSul.html
Chang Hon TKD students might like this!
http://iainabernethy.co.uk/
Karate students you might like this website!
Ezekiel 33:6 But if the watchman see the sword come, and blow not the horn, and the people be not warned, and the sword do come, and take any person from among them, he is taken away in his iniquity, but his blood will I require at the watchman's hand.

Offline Ephraim Ben Noach

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Re: Self Defence
« Reply #23 on: January 11, 2012, 11:23:29 PM »
http://trainfightwin.com/
This is a good free grappling website, but we have to remember that its a whole different game on the street.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2012, 12:20:18 PM by Nazarene911 »
Ezekiel 33:6 But if the watchman see the sword come, and blow not the horn, and the people be not warned, and the sword do come, and take any person from among them, he is taken away in his iniquity, but his blood will I require at the watchman's hand.

Offline Ephraim Ben Noach

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Re: Self Defence
« Reply #24 on: January 15, 2012, 11:08:06 PM »


I put the club vid on because you can use the same flowing technique with weapons. This is going to sound totally stupid, but think of the Okinawa drum technique on the movie karate kid while practicing the flow. The drum handle is your hips, and the balls are your hands.
Ezekiel 33:6 But if the watchman see the sword come, and blow not the horn, and the people be not warned, and the sword do come, and take any person from among them, he is taken away in his iniquity, but his blood will I require at the watchman's hand.