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General Category => General Discussion => Topic started by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 26, 2018, 05:09:08 PM

Title: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 26, 2018, 05:09:08 PM
I love to read frightening tales. Do you? Who are your favorite writers?
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Zelhar on November 26, 2018, 05:59:40 PM
I haven't read any fiction in quite a while and I don't think I've read horror tales. I prefer fantasy classics.
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 26, 2018, 06:20:57 PM
I love horror because fear is the strongest emotion of mankind. Religion and fear are closely related. Fantasy and horror are also related. My favorite writers are Irving, Poe, Lovecraft and Matoš.     
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Noachide on November 27, 2018, 03:42:21 AM
I might have read Edgar Allan Poe in the past but just short stories. Also I have read Still Life with Crows by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child which could be horror novel at least partially. But anyhow, my genre is crime fiction so I read mostly crime novels.
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 27, 2018, 05:03:21 AM
I might have read Edgar Allan Poe in the past but just short stories. Also I have read Still Life with Crows by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child which could be horror novel at least partially. But anyhow, my genre is crime fiction so I read mostly crime novels.

They say that Poe invented the detective story. Detective stories are part of crime fiction. I think that Poe's "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" might interest you.
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Noachide on November 27, 2018, 05:41:59 AM
They say that Poe invented the detective story. Detective stories are part of crime fiction. I think that Poe's "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" might interest you.
Yes now I remember, I have read "The Murders in the Rue Morgue". It is quite a good story. Wikpedia article says:  "It has been recognized as the first modern detective story". I tend to quickly forget what I have read. It is just instant fun for me.
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 27, 2018, 06:39:37 AM
Yes now I remember, I have read "The Murders in the Rue Morgue". It is quite a good story. Wikpedia article says:  "It has been recognized as the first modern detective story". I tend to quickly forget what I have read. It is just instant fun for me.

I love that story and the Nox Arcana adaptation: https://youtu.be/tugdQ4bIfL0
Of course Torah is our priority. It is easy to forget what is secondary. Don't tell Michael, but sometimes I scare the hell out of my learners with horror tales. 
:)   
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Noachide on November 27, 2018, 06:52:14 AM
I love that story and the Nox Arcana adaptation: https://youtu.be/tugdQ4bIfL0
Of course Torah is our priority. It is easy to forget what is secondary. Don't tell Michael, but sometimes I scare the hell out of my learners with horror tales. 
:)   
Love the music, it is so intense. Nothing compares to Torah, it is so sweet to learn. I will keep silent with Rav. :)
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Israel Chai on November 29, 2018, 03:32:50 AM
Pfft i just laugh at whatever people say is the scariest horror movie now. Even the one with the sleep paralysis one where I know its true because I killed that night zombie ghost hag thing at 11, the efficient reactions I found are crazy laugh and blood rage, either one of them my head can't trick me. Fear is always the inefficient and life-threatening reaction, and Torah bans it everywhere I can find. Angels always say stop it. Never to my knowledge is Hashem like hey guys, great plan, get super spooked before your stuff today kay?

As for books, I've never considered one scary. Suspense doesn't do much for me, psychological thrillers are like articles that turn out to be adds, slashers are torture porn, and for the good ones there is nothing I can conjure in my mind that actually scares me, and that's a dark place when I make it.
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 29, 2018, 07:25:16 AM
Pfft i just laugh at whatever people say is the scariest horror movie now. Even the one with the sleep paralysis one where I know its true because I killed that night zombie ghost hag thing at 11, the efficient reactions I found are crazy laugh and blood rage, either one of them my head can't trick me. Fear is always the inefficient and life-threatening reaction, and Torah bans it everywhere I can find. Angels always say stop it. Never to my knowledge is Hashem like hey guys, great plan, get super spooked before your stuff today kay?

As for books, I've never considered one scary. Suspense doesn't do much for me, psychological thrillers are like articles that turn out to be adds, slashers are torture porn, and for the good ones there is nothing I can conjure in my mind that actually scares me, and that's a dark place when I make it.

This movie frightened me: https://youtu.be/6LiKKFZyhRU

Gentiles are commanded to fear HaShem. But a Gentile's capacity to fear is not required to be reserved for HaShem alone.

All men fear death. Countless horror tales focus on the fear of death: "The Masque of the Red Death," "The Fall of the House of Usher," "The Pit and the Pendulum" and so on and so forth.   
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Israel Chai on December 02, 2018, 11:39:15 PM
This movie frightened me: https://youtu.be/6LiKKFZyhRU

Gentiles are commanded to fear HaShem. But a Gentile's capacity to fear is not required to be reserved for HaShem alone.

All men fear death. Countless horror tales focus on the fear of death: "The Masque of the Red Death," "The Fall of the House of Usher," "The Pit and the Pendulum" and so on and so forth.   

It's not fear like G-d forbid "Hashem is coming, run"! Fear of Hashem is your first and a constant goal, to be master of your thoughts, speech and actions. I mean fear like eek run, or oh no big train coming to hit me better freeze.

People who fear death are less useful as soldiers. I just want a good one.
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 02, 2018, 11:48:14 PM
It's not fear like G-d forbid "Hashem is coming, run"! Fear of Hashem is your first and a constant goal, to be master of your thoughts, speech and actions. I mean fear like eek run, or oh no big train coming to hit me better freeze.

People who fear death are less useful as soldiers. I just want a good one.

Bro, I survived my own death-bed. I felt the wrath of HaShem. He terrifies me.

I agree that some fears are unhealthy. I think that fear of death is healthy because it helps you stay alive.
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Israel Chai on January 16, 2019, 09:56:36 AM
I thought the movie silent hill was like 1% scary when i was 16, prob my fave horror.
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 16, 2019, 04:48:58 PM
I thought the movie silent hill was like 1% scary when i was 16, prob my fave horror.

The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown. These facts few psychologists will dispute, and their admitted truth must establish for all time the genuineness and dignity of the weirdly horrible tale as a literary form. Against it are discharged all the shafts of a materialistic sophistication which clings to frequently felt emotions and external events, and of a naively insipid idealism which deprecates the aesthetic motive and calls for a didactic literature to uplift the reader toward a suitable degree of smirking optimism. But in spite of all this opposition the weird tale has survived, developed, and attained remarkable heights of perfection; founded as it is on a profound and elementary principle whose appeal, if not always universal, must necessarily be poignant and permanent to minds of the requisite sensitiveness.

The appeal of the spectrally macabre is generally narrow because it demands from the reader a certain degree of imagination and a capacity for detachment from every-day life. Relatively few are free enough from the spell of the daily routine to respond to rappings from outside, and tales of ordinary feelings and events, or of common sentimental distortions of such feelings and events, will always take first place in the taste of the majority; rightly, perhaps, since of course these ordinary matters make up the greater part of human experience. But the sensitive are always with us, and sometimes a curious streak of fancy invades an obscure corner of the very hardest head; so that no amount of rationalisation, reform, or Freudian analysis can quite annul the thrill of the chimney-corner whisper or the lonely wood. There is here involved a psychological pattern or tradition as real and as deeply grounded in mental experience as any other pattern or tradition of mankind; coeval with the religious feeling and closely related to many aspects of it, and too much a part of our inmost biological heritage to lose keen potency over a very important, though not numerically great, minority of our species.

Man’s first instincts and emotions formed his response to the environment in which he found himself. Definite feelings based on pleasure and pain grew up around the phenomena whose causes and effects he understood, whilst around those which he did not understand—and the universe teemed with them in the early days—were naturally woven such personifications, marvellous interpretations, and sensations of awe and fear as would be hit upon by a race having few and simple ideas and limited experience. The unknown, being likewise the unpredictable, became for our primitive forefathers a terrible and omnipotent source of boons and calamities visited upon mankind for cryptic and wholly extra-terrestrial reasons, and thus clearly belonging to spheres of existence whereof we know nothing and wherein we have no part. The phenomenon of dreaming likewise helped to build up the notion of an unreal or spiritual world; and in general, all the conditions of savage dawn-life so strongly conduced toward a feeling of the supernatural, that we need not wonder at the thoroughness with which man’s very hereditary essence has become saturated with religion and superstition. That saturation must, as a matter of plain scientific fact, be regarded as virtually permanent so far as the subconscious mind and inner instincts are concerned; for though the area of the unknown has been steadily contracting for thousands of years, an infinite reservoir of mystery still engulfs most of the outer cosmos, whilst a vast residuum of powerful inherited associations clings around all the objects and processes that were once mysterious, however well they may now be explained. And more than this, there is an actual physiological fixation of the old instincts in our nervous tissue, which would make them obscurely operative even were the conscious mind to be purged of all sources of wonder.

Because we remember pain and the menace of death more vividly than pleasure, and because our feelings toward the beneficent aspects of the unknown have from the first been captured and formalised by conventional religious rituals, it has fallen to the lot of the darker and more maleficent side of cosmic mystery to figure chiefly in our popular supernatural folklore. This tendency, too, is naturally enhanced by the fact that uncertainty and danger are always closely allied; thus making any kind of an unknown world a world of peril and evil possibilities. When to this sense of fear and evil the inevitable fascination of wonder and curiosity is superadded, there is born a composite body of keen emotion and imaginative provocation whose vitality must of necessity endure as long as the human race itself. Children will always be afraid of the dark, and men with minds sensitive to hereditary impulse will always tremble at the thought of the hidden and fathomless worlds of strange life which may pulsate in the gulfs beyond the stars, or press hideously upon our own globe in unholy dimensions which only the dead and the moonstruck can glimpse.

With this foundation, no one need wonder at the existence of a literature of cosmic fear. It has always existed, and always will exist; and no better evidence of its tenacious vigour can be cited than the impulse which now and then drives writers of totally opposite leanings to try their hands at it in isolated tales, as if to discharge from their minds certain phantasmal shapes which would otherwise haunt them.

This type of fear-literature must not be confounded with a type externally similar but psychologically widely different; the literature of mere physical fear and the mundanely gruesome. Such writing, to be sure, has its place, as has the conventional or even whimsical or humorous ghost story where formalism or the author’s knowing wink removes the true sense of the morbidly unnatural; but these things are not the literature of cosmic fear in its purest sense. The true weird tale has something more than secret murder, bloody bones, or a sheeted form clanking chains according to rule. A certain atmosphere of breathless and unexplainable dread of outer, unknown forces must be present; and there must be a hint, expressed with a seriousness and portentousness becoming its subject, of that most terrible conception of the human brain—a malign and particular suspension or defeat of those fixed laws of Nature which are our only safeguard against the assaults of chaos and the daemons of unplumbed space.

Naturally we cannot expect all weird tales to conform absolutely to any theoretical model. Creative minds are uneven, and the best of fabrics have their dull spots. Moreover, much of the choicest weird work is unconscious; appearing in memorable fragments scattered through material whose massed effect may be of a very different cast. Atmosphere is the all-important thing, for the final criterion of authenticity is not the dovetailing of a plot but the creation of a given sensation. We may say, as a general thing, that a weird story whose intent is to teach or produce a social effect, or one in which the horrors are finally explained away by natural means, is not a genuine tale of cosmic fear; but it remains a fact that such narratives often possess, in isolated sections, atmospheric touches which fulfil every condition of true supernatural horror-literature. Therefore we must judge a weird tale not by the author’s intent, or by the mere mechanics of the plot; but by the emotional level which it attains at its least mundane point. If the proper sensations are excited, such a “high spot” must be admitted on its own merits as weird literature, no matter how prosaically it is later dragged down. The one test of the really weird is simply this—whether or not there be excited in the reader a profound sense of dread, and of contact with unknown spheres and powers; a subtle attitude of awed listening, as if for the beating of black wings or the scratching of outside shapes and entities on the known universe’s utmost rim. And of course, the more completely and unifiedly a story conveys this atmosphere, the better it is as a work of art in the given medium.

http://www.hplovecraft.com/writings/texts/essays/shil.aspx

Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Israel Chai on January 17, 2019, 01:01:46 PM
That's for an entertaining scare. They also describe the environment you need to create to produce scares adequately. However, they describe mostly what would scare an emotionally unsettled person. For the thick-skinned, the threat of death isn't going to cut it, we walk around like that and pfft. Then the threat is what? "secret murder, bloody bones, or a sheeted form clanking chains according to rule". C'mon, it's like you create that whole feeling of uncertainty, you see what it is and like oh just death, whatever.

There are so, so many things worse than death, that's what you gotta focus on to scare everyone.
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 17, 2019, 02:08:37 PM
That's for an entertaining scare. They also describe the environment you need to create to produce scares adequately. However, they describe mostly what would scare an emotionally unsettled person. For the thick-skinned, the threat of death isn't going to cut it, we walk around like that and pfft. Then the threat is what? "secret murder, bloody bones, or a sheeted form clanking chains according to rule". C'mon, it's like you create that whole feeling of uncertainty, you see what it is and like oh just death, whatever.

There are so, so many things worse than death, that's what you gotta focus on to scare everyone.

The fear of the unknown is closely related to the fear of the dark:

"But they couldn't make him go; hesitating on the doorstep while the nurse's feet crunched across the frost-covered grass to the gate, he knew that. He would answer: "You can say I'm ill. I won't go. I'm afraid of the dark." And his mother: "Don't be silly. You know there's nothing to be afraid of in the dark." But he knew the falsity of that reasoning; he knew how they taught also that there was nothing to fear in death, and how fearfully they avoided the idea of it."

http://www.classicshorts.com/stories/EndParty.html

HaShem is the only one more frightening than death. If you think there are so many things worse than death, do list them.

Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Joe Gutfeld on January 17, 2019, 04:05:33 PM
A real horror tale is anything written by Hillary Clinton. 
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 17, 2019, 06:03:45 PM
A real horror tale is anything written by Hillary Clinton.

 :::D
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Israel Chai on January 18, 2019, 09:56:10 AM
The fear of the unknown is closely related to the fear of the dark:

"But they couldn't make him go; hesitating on the doorstep while the nurse's feet crunched across the frost-covered grass to the gate, he knew that. He would answer: "You can say I'm ill. I won't go. I'm afraid of the dark." And his mother: "Don't be silly. You know there's nothing to be afraid of in the dark." But he knew the falsity of that reasoning; he knew how they taught also that there was nothing to fear in death, and how fearfully they avoided the idea of it."

http://www.classicshorts.com/stories/EndParty.html

HaShem is the only one more frightening than death. If you think there are so many things worse than death, do list them.

Chinese water torture with sugar water on your leg onto an open wound where giant centipedes crawl over you naked to get while someone skull humps your eye socket after they ripped your eye out while lying in a box with cornstarch and water mixed so it stays hard if you move and it's quicksand if you try to relax for a second.

One off the top of my head. Even just something simple like spike needle mouthguard, where every time you bite down sharp metal needles penetrate your gums and death from it because someone locked you in a room with the fanciest feast for a month, like I'll take a bullet to the stomach over that and a million other things.

I walk into dark alleys were there are certainly people waiting to kill me every couple weeks. I just get a little rush, and I like it anyways, I'm the scariest thing in the dark, and I always smell so much sweet fear.
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 20, 2019, 01:43:43 AM
I'm the scariest thing in the dark.

This made me laugh in a good way! Thanks!

Being tortured to death is a kind of death.
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Yehudayaakov on January 20, 2019, 05:38:44 AM
I've read the lord of the rings all the books or at least the most known of the series...does it count? the monsters are quite frightening in it! very terrifying...
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 20, 2019, 08:15:36 AM
I've read the lord of the rings all the books or at least the most known of the series...does it count? the monsters are quite frightening in it! very terrifying...

They are! Especially the black riders and the dead faces in the water.   
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: briann on January 20, 2019, 01:12:14 PM
I think we need to have a 'Noahid reads Horror' channel here.   ;D
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Israel Chai on January 20, 2019, 02:14:34 PM
I've read the lord of the rings all the books or at least the most known of the series...does it count? the monsters are quite frightening in it! very terrifying...

Can there be a translation in today's English though? Like I had to keep my 18th century thesaurus too close for it to be an entertaining read.
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 20, 2019, 06:52:54 PM
I think we need to have a 'Noahid reads Horror' channel here.   ;D

Great idea. I might fill in when Chaim's computer is down. JTF This Week: The only Noahide goth in the world reads horror and frightens muslims to death.   


 
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 20, 2019, 09:35:15 PM
Can there be a translation in today's English though? Like I had to keep my 18th century thesaurus too close for it to be an entertaining read.

Many men there ben that with eeres openly sprad so moche swalowen the deliciousnesse of jestes and of ryme by queynt knitting coloures that of the goodnesse or of the badnesse of the sentence take they litel hede or els non.
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Israel Chai on January 21, 2019, 05:13:51 PM
Many men there ben that with eeres openly sprad so moche swalowen the deliciousnesse of jestes and of ryme by queynt knitting coloures that of the goodnesse or of the badnesse of the sentence take they litel hede or els non.

Yeah see I have to read all the sentences three times and kinda say them to understand and I'm used to reading extremely fast, gets frustrating.
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 21, 2019, 06:26:58 PM
Yeah see I have to read all the sentences three times and kinda say them to understand and I'm used to reading extremely fast, gets frustrating.

A good editor will modernize a literary classic.
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 02, 2019, 04:41:36 AM
Gothic Literature/Gothic Books: https://youtu.be/_fSYYbe5S5U
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Noachide on March 04, 2019, 07:35:37 AM
Gothic Literature/Gothic Books: https://youtu.be/_fSYYbe5S5U
There are some interesting novels here. Have you read some of them?
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 04, 2019, 01:04:12 PM
There are some interesting novels here. Have you read some of them?

I have read Dracula, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, Poe, Carmilla, The House of the Seven Gables, The Picture of Dorian Gray, The Vampyre, Lovecraft and Frankenstein.

In my school I learned American and British literature. Irving, Poe, Hawthorne, The Picture of Dorian Gray and Frankenstein were required reading.

Frankenstein may be the most frightening horror fiction I have ever read.

Composed in competition with her husband, Lord Byron, and Dr. John William Polidori in an effort to prove supremacy in horror-making, Mrs. Shelley's Frankenstein was the only one of the rival narratives to be brought to an elaborate completion; and criticism has failed to prove that the best parts are due to Shelley rather than to her. The novel, somewhat tinged but scarcely marred by moral didacticism, tells of the artificial human being moulded from charnel fragments by Victor Frankenstein, a young Swiss medical student. Created by its designer "in the mad pride of intellectuality", the monster possesses full intelligence but owns a hideously loathsome form. It is rejected by mankind, becomes embittered, and at length begins the successive murder of all whom young Frankenstein loves best, friends and family. It demands that Frankenstein create a wife for it; and when the student finally refuses in horror lest the world be populated with such monsters, it departs with a hideous threat 'to be with him on his wedding night'. Upon that night the bride is strangled, and from that time on Frankenstein hunts down the monster, even into the wastes of the Arctic. In the end, whilst seeking shelter on the ship of the man who tells the story, Frankenstein himself is killed by the shocking object of his search and creation of his presumptuous pride. https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Supernatural_Horror_in_Literature/The_Aftermath_of_Gothic_Fiction

The Penny Dreadful portrayal of Victor Frankenstein was excellent: https://youtu.be/e0yaib5orEA
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Yehudayaakov on March 04, 2019, 01:50:34 PM
They are! Especially the black riders and the dead faces in the water.
Yes :o
i think when i will write a book many will consider it a horror one when i will write down all the persecutions i have been subjected i will revealed all the names family addresses where they live...these bastards currently reading this in some obscure place shitbetpolice facility are right now  frightened to death
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Noachide on March 05, 2019, 03:19:38 AM
I have read Dracula, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, Poe, Carmilla, The House of the Seven Gables, The Picture of Dorian Gray, The Vampyre, Lovecraft and Frankenstein.

In my school I learned American and British literature. Irving, Poe, Hawthorne, The Picture of Dorian Gray and Frankenstein were required reading.

Frankenstein may be the most frightening horror fiction I have ever read.

Composed in competition with her husband, Lord Byron, and Dr. John William Polidori in an effort to prove supremacy in horror-making, Mrs. Shelley's Frankenstein was the only one of the rival narratives to be brought to an elaborate completion; and criticism has failed to prove that the best parts are due to Shelley rather than to her. The novel, somewhat tinged but scarcely marred by moral didacticism, tells of the artificial human being moulded from charnel fragments by Victor Frankenstein, a young Swiss medical student. Created by its designer "in the mad pride of intellectuality", the monster possesses full intelligence but owns a hideously loathsome form. It is rejected by mankind, becomes embittered, and at length begins the successive murder of all whom young Frankenstein loves best, friends and family. It demands that Frankenstein create a wife for it; and when the student finally refuses in horror lest the world be populated with such monsters, it departs with a hideous threat 'to be with him on his wedding night'. Upon that night the bride is strangled, and from that time on Frankenstein hunts down the monster, even into the wastes of the Arctic. In the end, whilst seeking shelter on the ship of the man who tells the story, Frankenstein himself is killed by the shocking object of his search and creation of his presumptuous pride. https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Supernatural_Horror_in_Literature/The_Aftermath_of_Gothic_Fiction

The Penny Dreadful portrayal of Victor Frankenstein was excellent: https://youtu.be/e0yaib5orEA
In some cartoons this monster is portrayed like cool and friendly guy. I never knew the full plot of Frankenstein, it is so tragic.
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 05, 2019, 04:17:37 AM
In some cartoons this monster is portrayed like cool and friendly guy. I never knew the full plot of Frankenstein, it is so tragic.

Frankenstein has some of the most tragic sentences in British literature:

"I feel exquisite pleasure in dwelling on the recollections of childhood, before misfortune had tainted my mind and changed its bright visions of extensive usefulness into gloomy and narrow reflections upon self. Besides, in drawing the picture of my early days, I also record those events which led, by insensible steps, to my after tale of misery, for when I would account to myself for the birth of that passion which afterwards ruled my destiny I find it arise, like a mountain river, from ignoble and almost forgotten sources; but, swelling as it proceeded, it became the torrent which, in its course, has swept away all my hopes and joys. 

Thus strangely are our souls constructed, and by such slight ligaments are we bound to prosperity or ruin. When I look back, it seems to me as if this almost miraculous change of inclination and will was the immediate suggestion of the guardian angel of my life --the last effort made by the spirit of preservation to avert the storm that was even then hanging in the stars and ready to envelop me. Her victory was announced by an unusual tranquillity and gladness of soul which followed the relinquishing of my ancient and latterly tormenting studies. It was thus that I was to be taught to associate evil with their prosecution, happiness with their disregard.

It was a strong effort of the spirit of good, but it was ineffectual. Destiny was too potent, and her immutable laws had decreed my utter and terrible destruction.

The human frame could no longer support the agonies that I endured, and I was carried out of the room in strong convulsions. A fever succeeded to this. I lay for two months on the point of death; my ravings, as I afterwards heard, were frightful; I called myself the murderer of William, of Justine, and of Clerval. Sometimes I entreated my attendants to assist me in the destruction of the fiend by whom I was tormented; and at others I felt the fingers of the monster already grasping my neck, and screamed aloud with agony and terror. Fortunately, as I spoke my native language, Mr. Kirwin alone understood me; but my gestures and bitter cries were sufficient to affright the other witnesses. Why did I not die? More miserable than man ever was before, why did I not sink into forgetfulness and rest? Death snatches away many blooming children, the only hopes of their doting parents; how many brides and youthful lovers have been one day in the bloom of health and hope, and the next a prey for worms and the decay of the tomb! Of what materials was I made that I could thus resist so many shocks, which, like the turning of the wheel, continually renewed the torture?

Alas! My father, said I, how little do you know me. Human beings, their feelings and passions, would indeed be degraded if such a wretch as I felt pride. Justine, poor unhappy Justine, was as innocent as I, and she suffered the same charge; she died for it; and I am the cause of this--I murdered her. William, Justine, and Henry--they all died by my hands.

I am not mad, I cried energetically; the sun and the heavens, who have viewed my operations, can bear witness of my truth. I am the assassin of those most innocent victims; they died by my machinations. A thousand times would I have shed my own blood, drop by drop, to have saved their lives; but I could not, my father, indeed I could not sacrifice the whole human race.

You have travelled; you have spent several years of your life at Ingolstadt; and I confess to you, my friend, that when I saw you last autumn so unhappy, flying to solitude from the society of every creature, I could not help supposing that you might regret our connection and believe yourself bound in honour to fulfil the wishes of your parents, although they opposed themselves to your inclinations. But this is false reasoning. I confess to you, my friend, that I love you and that in my airy dreams of futurity you have been my constant friend and companion. But it is your happiness I desire as well as my own when I declare to you that our marriage would render me eternally miserable unless it were the dictate of your own free choice. Even now I weep to think that, borne down as you are by the cruellest misfortunes, you may stifle, by the word "honour," all hope of that love and happiness which would alone restore you to yourself. I, who have so disinterested an affection for you, may increase your miseries tenfold by being an obstacle to your wishes. Ah! Victor, be assured that your cousin and playmate has too sincere a love for you not to be made miserable by this supposition. Be happy, my friend; and if you obey me in this one request, remain satisfied that nothing on earth will have the power to interrupt my tranquillity.

Do not let this letter disturb you; do not answer tomorrow, or the next day, or even until you come, if it will give you pain. My uncle will send me news of your health, and if I see but one smile on your lips when we meet, occasioned by this or any other exertion of mine, I shall need no other happiness.

This letter revived in my memory what I had before forgotten, the threat of the fiend--I WILL BE WITH YOU ON YOUR WEDDING-NIGHT! Such was my sentence, and on that night would the daemon employ every art to destroy me and tear me from the glimpse of happiness which promised partly to console my sufferings. On that night he had determined to consummate his crimes by my death. Well, be it so; a deadly struggle would then assuredly take place, in which if he were victorious I should be at peace and his power over me be at an end. If he were vanquished, I should be a free man. Alas! What freedom? Such as the peasant enjoys when his family have been massacred before his eyes, his cottage burnt, his lands laid waste, and he is turned adrift, homeless, penniless, and alone, but free. Such would be my liberty except that in my Elizabeth I possessed a treasure, alas, balanced by those horrors of remorse and guilt which would pursue me until death.

Sweet and beloved Elizabeth! I read and reread her letter, and some softened feelings stole into my heart and dared to whisper paradisiacal dreams of love and joy; but the apple was already eaten, and the angel's arm bared to drive me from all hope. Yet I would die to make her happy. If the monster executed his threat, death was inevitable; yet, again, I considered whether my marriage would hasten my fate. My destruction might indeed arrive a few months sooner, but if my torturer should suspect that I postponed it, influenced by his menaces, he would surely find other and perhaps more dreadful means of revenge.

In this state of mind I wrote to Elizabeth. My letter was calm and affectionate. I fear, my beloved girl, I said, little happiness remains for us on earth; yet all that I may one day enjoy is centred in you. Chase away your idle fears; to you alone do I consecrate my life and my endeavours for contentment. I have one secret, Elizabeth, a dreadful one; when revealed to you, it will chill your frame with horror, and then, far from being surprised at my misery, you will only wonder that I survive what I have endured. I will confide this tale of misery and terror to you the day after our marriage shall take place, for, my sweet cousin, there must be perfect confidence between us. But until then, I conjure you, do not mention or allude to it. This I most earnestly entreat, and I know you will comply.

Those were the last moments of my life during which I enjoyed the feeling of happiness.

The wind, which had hitherto carried us along with amazing rapidity, sank at sunset to a light breeze; the soft air just ruffled the water and caused a pleasant motion among the trees as we approached the shore, from which it wafted the most delightful scent of flowers and hay. The sun sank beneath the horizon as we landed, and as I touched the shore I felt those cares and fears revive which soon were to clasp me and cling to me forever."

http://www.online-literature.com/shelley_mary/frankenstein/2/
http://www.online-literature.com/shelley_mary/frankenstein/21/
http://www.online-literature.com/shelley_mary/frankenstein/22/
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 07, 2019, 04:57:49 AM
Yes :o
i think when i will write a book many will consider it a horror one when i will write down all the persecutions i have been subjected i will revealed all the names family addresses where they live...these bastards currently reading this in some obscure place shitbetpolice facility are right now  frightened to death

Good luck with the book! You should publicize evil persons and their evil deeds.
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Israel Chai on January 07, 2020, 04:38:32 AM
The Penny Dreadful portrayal of Victor Frankenstein was excellent: https://youtu.be/e0yaib5orEA

Penny Dreadful was a barbeque and sing along with every horror character they could find, and more Catholic propaganda than supernatural. Didn't even get a laugh, watched all three seasons, just really boring.
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 07, 2020, 05:04:58 AM
Penny Dreadful was a barbeque and sing along with every horror character they could find, and more Catholic propaganda than supernatural. Didn't even get a laugh, watched all three seasons, just really boring.

It amuses me that you felt the need to comment just to tell me it's boring.

I find most women boring. I want a woman who dresses like Vanessa Ives, but who is a Noahide. I might be doomed to bachelorhood. 
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Israel Chai on January 07, 2020, 05:13:38 AM
It amuses me that you felt the need to comment just to tell me it's boring.

I find most women boring. I want a woman who dresses like Vanessa Ives, but who is a Noahide. I might be doomed to bachelorhood.

Just saying, part of the reason why I refuse to pay for anything from hollywood. They took perfectly good horror stories and made it tame and cute. The best they got was the blood orgy and that wasn't scary.

I couldn't give a crap how a girl dresses for the amigos and homeboys on the street. What do you gain from that? I know guys who tell me things like her nails are important, and it's quite baffling to me, there are way more important areas on her.

I guess many girls will want to talk about fashion and other things you might not have a reason to care about, but guys aren't supposed to spend their days talking to girls either, they find us boring to a point too. What we have in common we talk about, for the rest they have friends. There are gender neutral topics that are of consequence in the world to speak of. Besides, half the time it's how you say what you say and the thousand implications and the colored flags they raise for mundane things, it's a fun challenge to communicate like that a bit.
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 07, 2020, 05:27:00 AM
Just saying, part of the reason why I refuse to pay for anything from hollywood. They took perfectly good horror stories and made it tame and cute. The best they got was the blood orgy and that wasn't scary.

I couldn't give a crap how a girl dresses for the amigos and homeboys on the street. What do you gain from that? I know guys who tell me things like her nails are important, and it's quite baffling to me, there are way more important areas on her.

I guess many girls will want to talk about fashion and other things you might not have a reason to care about, but guys aren't supposed to spend their days talking to girls either, they find us boring to a point too. What we have in common we talk about, for the rest they have friends. There are gender neutral topics that are of consequence in the world to speak of. Besides, half the time it's how you say what you say and the thousand implications and the colored flags they raise for mundane things, it's a fun challenge to communicate like that a bit.

How a woman dresses is certainly important. I like gothic fashion and horror. It would kill me to have a wife who hates these things.   
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Israel Chai on January 07, 2020, 10:42:02 AM
How a woman dresses is certainly important. I like gothic fashion and horror. It would kill me to have a wife who hates these things.   

And if she's the hottest girl ever and just wants to be super modest and covered outside? Say she doesn't like horror but doesn't care if you want to watch it?
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 07, 2020, 11:28:02 AM
And if she's the hottest girl ever and just wants to be super modest and covered outside? Say she doesn't like horror but doesn't care if you want to watch it?

That's fine. My ex tried to change me and I will never let a woman do that.

It would be easier for me to marry a Jewish woman, but I know that is strictly forbidden and not an option. Like you said, Hashem never makes it easy.
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Israel Chai on January 07, 2020, 01:28:26 PM
That's fine. My ex tried to change me and I will never let a woman do that.

It would be easier for me to marry a Jewish woman, but I know that is strictly forbidden and not an option. Like you said, Hashem never makes it easy.

There's a fine line between changing and nesting. On Rabbi recommends you use half of your stuff; fill all your drawers halfway, leave half of your bathroom stuff on one side, everything leave a space the same you give yourself so there's room for a woman in your life, and then when you get married, G-d willing it should be very very soon, you don't feel like anything changes. If a girl really loves to change people, then like tell her you want her to dress in full Ms. Ives at home and changes you want, she'll either realize changing people isn't fun or you have a tit-for-tat that is mutually acceptable.

There's a facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/19240199247/ maybe invite your Noachide friends to join and get them to do the same so it's a bigger pool. There's literally no website devoted to it, I say there's a market opening there if you know an app developer. I think you're supposed to be Noachide for the laws and not the in-laws like Rav Kahane said about converts to Judaism, but if there were articles saying how great of a spouse a Noachide makes instead of like any idolater, maybe that'll grow the movement more. Probably tell your Rabbi to start publishing articles.
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 14, 2020, 08:40:15 PM
There's a fine line between changing and nesting. On Rabbi recommends you use half of your stuff; fill all your drawers halfway, leave half of your bathroom stuff on one side, everything leave a space the same you give yourself so there's room for a woman in your life, and then when you get married, G-d willing it should be very very soon, you don't feel like anything changes. If a girl really loves to change people, then like tell her you want her to dress in full Ms. Ives at home and changes you want, she'll either realize changing people isn't fun or you have a tit-for-tat that is mutually acceptable.

There's a facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/19240199247/ maybe invite your Noachide friends to join and get them to do the same so it's a bigger pool. There's literally no website devoted to it, I say there's a market opening there if you know an app developer. I think you're supposed to be Noachide for the laws and not the in-laws like Rav Kahane said about converts to Judaism, but if there were articles saying how great of a spouse a Noachide makes instead of like any idolater, maybe that'll grow the movement more. Probably tell your Rabbi to start publishing articles.

Thank you for the advice and the kind wishes, brother.
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Israel Chai on January 14, 2020, 09:46:09 PM
Thank you for the advice and the kind wishes, brother.

Yeah I'm there too, like keep your advice and give a blessing somewhere it does something, I said it, I get it if you're doing it here.

I don't know a way out. Some people die alone. It's hard enough to find a girl that matches you just out of everyone, when you're narrowing it down to a subsection of people, ten thousand times harder. No idea what to do. I really want to be able to give advice that does something. I remember we talked on this before and I brought up the stupid facebook group with five people and your negative experience. I feel you, that's how hard it was for me too and I research things for money, really tough.

I wish I had the words to make everything all better, I would throw them around till my tongue fell out. Since I'm not there to like take you to club or hotel lobby and cruise as many as possible for you, all I have is these little letters in this stupid box, so I wish my strength on you to take the path you want and G-d willing you should be blessed with the best mazal (I want to translate it as flow) to fulfill all your needs and wants.
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 17, 2021, 09:20:12 PM
The Nameless City by H. P. Lovecraft: https://www.hplovecraft.com/writings/texts/fiction/nc.aspx

The Nox Arcana music inspired by the story: https://youtu.be/RRWw7R_J3xM
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 18, 2021, 07:12:47 PM
The Devil and Tom Walker by Washington Irving: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Devil_Stories/The_Devil_and_Tom_Walker
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 19, 2021, 12:47:27 PM
The Masque of the Red Death by Edgar Allan Poe: https://poestories.com/read/masque

Nox Arcana's music adaptation: https://youtu.be/HwieZqoWstM
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 02, 2021, 05:27:38 AM
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving: https://www.bartleby.com/310/2/2.html

Tim Burton's film adaptation: https://youtu.be/6RsKwn_Je1k
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 06, 2021, 06:07:31 AM
The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe: https://www.eapoe.org/works/tales/usherf.htm

Nox Arcana's music adaptation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YUaC2kDfMwo
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 07, 2021, 11:54:20 AM
Samotna noć by Antun Gustav Matoš: https://www.knjizevnost.hr/samotna-noc/
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 11, 2021, 09:44:50 PM
Utjeha kose by Antun Gustav Matoš: https://hr.wikisource.org/wiki/Utjeha_kose
Title: Re: Horror literature
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 18, 2021, 08:17:40 PM
Anne Rice, author of gothic novels, dead at 80: https://youtu.be/ajC6pJXXOXM