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Torah and Jewish Idea => Torah and Jewish Idea => Topic started by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 14, 2018, 06:01:10 AM

Title: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 14, 2018, 06:01:10 AM
Abraham was forty years old when he became fully aware of his Creator. When he recognized and knew Him, he began to formulate the replies to the inhabitants of Ur Kasdim and debate with them, telling them that they were not following a proper path.

He broke their idols and began to teach the people that it is fitting to serve only the G-d of the universe, and to Him alone is it fitting to bow down, sacrifice, and offer libations, so that the people of future generations would learn to recognize Him. Conversely, he realized that it is fitting to destroy and break all idolatrous images, lest people err and think that there is no One G-d, but rather only these images (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 141-142).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 15, 2018, 04:55:57 AM
One who blasphemes and then regrets his words and retracts them - even immediately - is still liable for capital punishment from a Beit Din court if he sinned by cursing G-d's Explicit Name, and it is proven by valid testimony (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 265).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 16, 2018, 11:21:43 AM
Blessed are You, G-d, the Supreme Being who bestows abundant kindness. Please endow us graciously with wisdom, understanding and knowledge. Please accept our repentance, and forgive us for our errors and sins. Grant complete healing for all our wounds and ailments. Bestow upon us all the needs for our sustenance from Your bounty.

Hasten the day of which it is said: "G-d will be King over the entire earth; in that day G-d will be One and His Name One;" "For then I will turn the peoples to pure language, so that all will call upon the Name of G-d to serve Him with one purpose;" and "They will not harm or destroy on all My holy mountain, for the earth will be filled with knowledge of G-d as water covering the sea bed."

Hear our voice, G-d, our merciful Father, have compassion upon us and accept our prayers in mercy and favor. Blessed are You, G-d, Who hears prayer (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 104).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Israel Chai on May 17, 2018, 12:07:33 AM
Blessed are You, G-d, the Supreme Being who bestows abundant kindness. Please endow us graciously with wisdom, understanding and knowledge. Please accept our repentance, and forgive us for our errors and sins. Grant complete healing for all our wounds and ailments. Bestow upon us all the needs for our sustenance from Your bounty.

Hasten the day of which it is said: "G-d will be King over the entire earth; in that day G-d will be One and His Name One;" "For then I will turn the peoples to pure language, so that all will call upon the Name of G-d to serve Him with one purpose;" and "They will not harm or destroy on all My holy mountain, for the earth will be filled with knowledge of G-d as water covering the sea bed."

Hear our voice, G-d, our merciful Father, have compassion upon us and accept our prayers in mercy and favor. Blessed are You, G-d, Who hears prayer (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 104).

So that's a Noachide davening? I recognize the bits and parts from the regular siddur.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 17, 2018, 02:45:17 AM
So that's a Noachide davening? I recognize the bits and parts from the regular siddur.

This is a suggested prayer. A person can pray at any time of day, and in any fitting words that he chooses, but he should be careful not to use prayers that idol worshipers composed for their liturgies, because their intention for the prayer was surely to serve their idol.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 17, 2018, 11:00:07 AM
A man should not seclude himself alone with another man who is suspected of desiring to commit homosexual acts, in an area that is not readily open to public access or view (either in a city or in a field), so that he should not come to a transgression. Likewise, one should not let a male child or adolescent stay alone with such a man as his private student, apprentice or worker, or send a male youth to a destination under his escort, because he is suspected of desiring to commit homosexual acts (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 486-487).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: nessuno on May 17, 2018, 11:11:26 AM
This is a suggested prayer. A person can pray at any time of day, and in any fitting words that he chooses, but he should be careful not to use prayers that idol worshipers composed for their liturgies, because their intention for the prayer was surely to serve their idol.
Or choose a Muslim prayer. For they are not idol worshipers.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: nessuno on May 17, 2018, 11:14:22 AM
A man should not seclude himself alone with another man who is suspected of desiring to commit homosexual acts, in an area that is not readily open to public access or view (either in a city or in a field), so that he should not come to a transgression. Likewise, one should not let a male child or adolescent stay alone with such a man as his private student, apprentice or worker, or send a male youth to a destination under his escort, because he is suspected of desiring to commit homosexual acts (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 486-487).
If you come to transgressions...you are probably homosexual yourself. 
And commonsense dictates you don't leave your young child with adults you don't trust or know well enough.  Gay or straight.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 17, 2018, 11:18:51 AM
Or choose a Muslim prayer. For they are not idol worshipers.

I prefer praying in my own words  :)
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Israel Chai on May 17, 2018, 02:59:32 PM
Or choose a Muslim prayer. For they are not idol worshipers.

They have one idol, not many, still idol worshipers. Read the kkkoran. Hashem and Al*ah are not the same people, do not do the same things or function the same.

Even if they weren't, both the pig and the camel are the same idol trick, you can't say one religion is and the other isn't. The pig sticks forth his kosher hooves to distract from his mouth, and the camel sticks out his mouth and hides his feet. If you see anything an Xtian says, you know what it is, and if you see anything a muslim does, you know what it is. We were warned about these religions long, long ago, and they aren't anything new in the world, just old idolatries that look try to copy Judaism.

It's one thing for you to say it's not idolatry, which would be a minor debate for me, but for you to say that their so-called "prayers", which are devoid of any form of spirituality and are usually the equivalent of a gang creed where you state your loyalties, are acceptable for non-Jews, that's wrong on every level. Before these religions, you worshiped an idol or you were a Jew, no in between. If you were a good guy, you could see the difference and know where to go. Since they try to pretend that they're us by sticking out their feet or mouths, they trick good people who would have otherwise found Hashem into idolatry, or, if we go by Rambam only, serious error.

One religion has 3, and their top G-d is the same as ours, one religion has one, and their G-d has virtually no relation to Hashem in any of his traits or doings. For example, it says that Al**h wants you to sin so that he can forgive you, which is at best complete and utter heretical nonsense, and if you analyze it in context, another proof that Islam belongs right next to Catholicism, it just does it in reverse.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 18, 2018, 03:50:21 AM
If a religious statute is innovated to gather to the site of a specific pillar, this becomes the type of forbidden pillar that is mentioned in the Torah. An example is the Ka'aba stone at Mecca; since the congregating of people at this specific pillar, and the rituals, honor and holiness that were connected with it, were made into statutes of a religion, it is the type of pillar that is mentioned in the Torah (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 195-196).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 19, 2018, 03:50:07 AM
The "Oral Torah" includes the specific explanations of the "Written Torah." In reality, though, as the Torah is Divine Wisdom, it reflects the infinity of G-d: "Its measure is longer than the earth and wider than the sea" (Job 11:9). Its teachings and meanings are innumerable, ranging from the traditional simple meaning of the actual text to the most profound mystical insights. Moreover, the teachings of the Torah apply to all circumstances and conditions, at all times and in all places. Thus it would be impossible to contain this infinity in any finite depository. To this end the A-mighty revealed to Moses a set of rules for valid hermeneutical interpretation, to draw legitimate conclusions from the established principles. These rules underlie the Rabbinic analysis and discussions in the Talmud and later writings that explain how practical codifications and rulings are in accordance with G-d's will (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 42).

Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 20, 2018, 07:53:04 AM
We have left out Rambam's statement, "one who accepts them is called a Ger Toshav (Hebrew term translated as Gentile Resident of the Holy Land)," and all the laws of the Ger Toshav, because they do not apply when the observance of the 50-year cycle of Jubilee in the Land of Israel is suspended, as Rambam writes in Laws of the Worship of Stars (and Idols) 10:6. If a Gentile declares his acceptance of the Noahide Commandments before three observant Jewish men, it does not change anything in regard to his obligation to observe the Noahide Code, or his merit to be called one of the Pious of the Nations (Hassidei Umot Ha'Olom, in Hebrew). This formal declaration of acceptance only permits the Jews to allow this Gentile to live as a resident in the Land of Israel in accordance with Torah Law. See Likkutei Sihot, vol. 26, p. 134 (and Tzafnat Pane'ah on Hilhot Issurei Bi'ah ch. 14), which explains that this is the opinion of Rambam. This appears to also be the opinion of Rashba in Torat Habayit, quoted in Beit Yosef Yoreh De'ah ch. 124: "And we do not require him to accept them in front of a Jewish Court of three..."

It seems clear from Kesef Mishneh on Hilhot Avodat Kohavim ch. 10, that Rambam rules that nowadays, if a Gentile wants to act as a Ger Toshav by keeping the Noahide Code, Jews should not prevent him from living in Israel.

This does not seem to be the opinion of Ramban and Ritva in Tractate Makot 9, who say that a Gentile is not "fulfilling a commandment" unless he accepts them before a Jewish Court of three, and then is he called a Ger Toshav. (They may mean that this applies when all the Jews are gathered to Israel and the Jubilee cycle is in effect, for then Gentiles will need to make this declaration to be granted residence in Israel; nowadays, however, it may not make any difference in their obligation to observe these commandments.)

The question on their opinion arises because it is unclear whether they hold like Rambam that the literal Ger Toshav status does not apply in our days, and therefore we come to the conclusion that this declaration makes no practical difference, or if they hold like Ra'avad (Laws of Forbidden Sexual Relations, ch. 14) that there is a concept, and the granting, of a Ger Toshav status even in our times. If Ramban and Ritva hold like Ra'avad, it would be obvious that their opinion is that this is the only true way to fully accept the Noahide Commandments, and they would then say that this also applies nowadays (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 64-65).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 21, 2018, 07:41:58 AM
Moleh is an ancient type of idol worship, and one who serves it in its traditional manner or performs one of the four services reserved for G-d before it (bowing, slaughtering, burning, or pouring a libation) is liable for a capital sin (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 176). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 22, 2018, 02:44:17 PM
The Talmud recalls an incisive anecdote to illustrate the significance and centrality of the tradition known as the "Oral Torah:"

A Gentile came to the famous sage Hillel, and stipulated that he could believe only in the "Written Torah," rejecting a priori the "Oral Torah." Hillel patiently accepted the challenge and started teaching him the letters of the Hebrew alphabet: "This is an aleph, this is a bet, this is a gimmel, this is a dalet," and so forth. The following day he taught him the letters in reversed order. The Gentile protested: "This is not what you taught me yesterday!" Hillel responded:

"Obviously you must rely on me to know the truth. So, too, you must rely on me with respect to the Oral Torah" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 42-43).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Israel Chai on May 23, 2018, 11:24:25 AM
We had a guy here called Muman who would post lectures all the time and we miss him. You're the new Noachide Muman of JTF now :)
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 23, 2018, 03:49:11 PM
We had a guy here called Muman who would post lectures all the time and we miss him. You're the new Noachide Muman of JTF now :)

I do my best!  :) Why did he leave?

This information is important for Jews because Jews are commanded to learn Torah for its own sake.

Gentiles are obligated to fulfill the Seven Noahide Commandments because they are the eternal command of G-d, transmitted through Moses our teacher in the Torah. Since a Gentile is commanded by G-d regarding the Noahide Code, and this includes the study of these precepts within Torah, the reward for this study is great; it is a spiritual reward that is like the reward for observing the Noahide commandments. 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Israel Chai on May 24, 2018, 03:26:27 AM
I do my best!  :) Why did he leave?

This information is important for Jews because Jews are commanded to learn Torah for its own sake.

Gentiles are obligated to fulfill the Seven Noahide Commandments because they are the eternal command of G-d, transmitted through Moses our teacher in the Torah. Since a Gentile is commanded by G-d regarding the Noahide Code, and this includes the study of these precepts within Torah, the reward for this study is great; it is a spiritual reward that is like the reward for observing the Noahide commandments.

I can summon him. JTF got blocked at his job and he got hooked on facebook.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 24, 2018, 04:00:58 AM
I can summon him. JTF got blocked at his job and he got hooked on facebook.

If he wishes to discuss Torah, I look forward to his return.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 24, 2018, 11:17:38 AM
The prohibition against flesh from a living animal does not apply to: arthropods (e.g. shrimp, lobsters, insects); reptiles (e.g. snakes, lizards); amphibians (e.g. frogs); mollusks (e.g. snails, squid, octopus, clams, oysters, scallops); annelids (e.g. worms); fish; jellyfish; or starfish (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 301). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Binyamin Yisrael on May 25, 2018, 12:25:56 AM
The prohibition against flesh from a living animal does not apply to: arthropods (e.g. shrimp, lobsters, insects); reptiles (e.g. snakes, lizards); amphibians (e.g. frogs); mollusks (e.g. snails, squid, octopus, clams, oysters, scallops); annelids (e.g. worms); fish; jellyfish; or starfish (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 301).


So it only applies for birds and mammals?


Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 25, 2018, 06:58:10 AM


So it only applies for birds and mammals?

Yes, the prohibition against eating flesh taken from a living animal applies only to domesticated mammals, wild mammals and birds. These are all the animals for which there is a Torah Law distinction between their flesh and their blood. The kosher species status is of no consequence whatsoever to this prohibition.

I will add that G-d also did not grant permission to eat human flesh, whether or not it would be removed while the person was alive. These four categories of living beings are represented by the four faces of the hayot angels of the divine chariot: the faces of the ox, lion, eagle and human. Since these angels are elevated to the highest levels of the heavens, we can speculate that G-d gives an extra honor to their reflections in the physical world through the Torah's universal restrictions on eiver min ha'hai and cannibalism.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Binyamin Yisrael on May 25, 2018, 02:09:55 PM
I know it doesn't apply to fish but I didn't know that reptiles and amphibians are in the same category as non-kosher fish. I guess it makes sense for amphibians since they live partially in the sea.

So what about whales? They are mammals and live in the sea. Does that make them Halachically fish? Are Noahides allowed to eat whales without killing them first?

Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 25, 2018, 05:03:35 PM
I know it doesn't apply to fish but I didn't know that reptiles and amphibians are in the same category as non-kosher fish. I guess it makes sense for amphibians since they live partially in the sea.

So what about whales? They are mammals and live in the sea. Does that make them Halachically fish? Are Noahides allowed to eat whales without killing them first?

Even large sea mammals (for example, whales, dolphins and the like), which are included in the Torah's category of fish-like animals, are therefore not included in the prohibition of eiver min ha'hai.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Binyamin Yisrael on May 25, 2018, 05:05:39 PM
What about sea lions? They can walk out of the water and seem like dogs. I saw one in an aquarium and seemed like a dog when it was out of the water.

https://knowledgenuts.com/2013/08/15/dogs-and-bears-are-closely-related-to-seals

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zRGBP48YMfM

Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 25, 2018, 08:07:14 PM
What about sea lions? They can walk out of the water and seem like dogs. I saw one in an aquarium and seemed like a dog when it was out of the water.

https://knowledgenuts.com/2013/08/15/dogs-and-bears-are-closely-related-to-seals

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zRGBP48YMfM

Mammals that dwell both in the sea and on the land are considered as wild land mammals and are included in this prohibition (e.g. seals, sea otters and sea lions).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 25, 2018, 08:25:29 PM
Likewise, regarding stores that provide plastic or paper bags at the check-out line for their customers' purchases: if in the eyes of the society, one such bag is not considered to have any monetary value, then the owner would surely not be concerned if just one bag were taken without permission. Nevertheless, it is forbidden to take even one shopping bag without the permission of the owner, for if many people would come along and each one would take one bag without making any purchase, the owner would suffer monetary loss, and this certainly matters to him.

It is not sufficient to ask permission from a store employee who is not authorized to decide on behalf of the owner. If one does not get proper permission to take a bag, he can avoid theft by making a small purchase.

This is not comparable to the case of pulling off slivers of wood, since it is unlikely that more than one person would come and take slivers, and therefore the owner does not mind. But it is a usual occurrence for almost all of the customers to take a bag from the store for their purchases, causing an expense to the merchant, and surely the merchant would mind when people who are not buying merchandise from the store take the store's bags (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 569-570).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 26, 2018, 12:53:41 PM
A person should always honor G-d's Name, in any language. When one does mention His Name, one should think about the reason and purpose for mentioning it, in order that it not be mentioned in vain (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 271).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 27, 2018, 02:46:08 PM
Likewise, a country whose sins outnumber its merits is liable to be destroyed immediately, like Sodom about which it says, "And G-d said, "Because the outcry of Sodom and Gomorrah has become very great, and because their sin has been very grave, I will descend and see: if they act in accordance with its outcry which has come to Me."

Likewise for the entire world: if their sins outnumbered their merits, they would be wiped out, as it says about the generation of the flood, "G-d saw that the wickedness of mankind was great upon the earth ... and G-d reconsidered having made mankind on earth ... and G-d said, "I will blot out mankind" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 127-128).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 29, 2018, 11:34:41 AM
Every person* whose heart desires, and who has the motivation and understanding to separate himself to stand before G-d, to serve Him and to gain knowledge about Him, and who goes in the correct path that G-d made for him, and who removes from upon himself the many calculations which people strive after, has become sanctified as "holy of holies." G-d will be this person's portion and inheritance forever, and he will merit to have his necessities met in this world, as did the Priests who served in the Holy Temple.

This comparison is made above in topic 5:6, which explain that a pious Gentile who involves himself in learning Torah in the area of the Noahide Commandments is compared to a High Priest who serves in the Holy Temple.

Thus said David, may he rest in peace: "G-d is the portion of my inheritance and of my cup; You maintain my lot."

*See Likkutei Sihot vol. 13, p. 230, that this term "ish va'ish" refers equally to Gentiles as well as Jews (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 128).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 30, 2018, 05:46:49 PM
Thus we speak of four dimensions of traditional meaning in the Torah: the simple meaning of the text, the allusions, the hermeneutical interpretations, and the mystical meanings. These four levels are summarized in the Hebrew acronym PaRDe"S (literally "orchard" or "garden") in context of the Talmudic passage in Tractate Hagigah 14b of the "four who entered the Pardes" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 42).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 31, 2018, 01:07:45 PM
It is forbidden for a person to ponder in his heart on concepts of idol worship, or to research idolatrous concepts in an attempt to discover if they are true or not (since they are certainly false). These are included in the Torah's prohibition, "Do not turn to the idols ..." (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 148).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 01, 2018, 09:04:49 PM
What is the definition of "swearing in vain"? This is one of the following four types of vows:

(a) One who swears about a known thing, in which there exists no doubt to its truth, like one who swears that a stone is a stone. Included in this category are those who hurry to swear when there is no true need for an oath;

(b) One who swears about a matter which all know is false, like swearing that a man is a woman, or a stone is gold, which is not only false, but needs no verification.

(c) One who swears to do something which he has no power to accomplish, like swearing not to sleep for three consecutive days and nights, or not to eat for seven days (or not to sleep or eat without giving a timeframe for his vow, which implies that the vow exists forever), utters a vow in vain, since he will surely not be able to keep it.

One need not pain himself and deprive himself of sleep for one or two days until he goes against his vow, and likewise for deprivation of food; rather it is permitted for him to eat and sleep right away, for since his vow is in vain, his words are of no consequence.

(d) One who swears about a prohibition he is commanded in (for example, swearing that he will eat flesh taken from a living animal, or steal, or commit adultery), has uttered a vain oath, since it is forbidden for him to keep his words, and he has no need to make such a vow (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 280-281).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 04, 2018, 01:02:40 AM
A woman may only be married to one man at a time, and if she becomes "married" to two men, she is considered married only to the first one she had relations with for the purpose of marriage, and she and the second man are liable for the capital sin of adultery. It is related in Torah sources that G-d considers a marriage ceremony itself of one woman wedding an additional man to be repulsive (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 518).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 06, 2018, 03:27:00 AM
This is opposite to the visiting and praying which takes place at the "Western Wall" in Jerusalem, for there is no Torah Law or Rabbinical obligation to congregate there or at the site of any other monument. The Torah obligation is for Jews to gather in the Holy Temple on the three Jewish pilgrimage festivals, if it is built and functioning on its established site, as they are commanded in (a) Deut. 16:16, "Three times a year all your males should appear before the L-rd, your G-d, in the place that He will choose ..." (cf. Exodus 23:14-19), and (b) Deut. 31:10-13, "At the end of seven years ... during the Succot festival when all Israel comes to appear before the L-rd, your G-d, in the place that He will choose, ... gather together (all) the people ... and their children ..."

Making a requirement for a specific place to worship, other than the Divinely sanctified Holy Temple when it is functioning, is an example of an innovated commandment. Also, one who relegates the Temple Mount to a status of secondary holiness in the world is accepting an innovated doctrine. This is one of the aspects of a forbidden pillar: designating a specific place as sanctified for obligatory congregating, other than the Holy Temple in Jerusalem. In contrast, the Holy Temple in Jerusalem is G-d's chosen place for the revelation of His Divine Presence, as stated (Psalms 132:13-14): "For the L-rd has chosen Zion; He desired it for His dwelling place. This is My resting place forever, here I will dwell, for I have desired it." (See Rambam, Laws of the Chosen House 1:3.) Therefore, if one claims that there is some place with a more exalted presence of Divinity than at the site of the Holy Temple, that has the connotation of some other divinity which is not the One  G-d of Israel, Who is the Source of the eternal Hebrew Scriptures.

The "Western Wall" is a remnant of the rampart around the Holy Temple, which was built in fulfillment of G-d's command in Ex. 25:8: "They shall make Me a Sanctuary ..." Therefore, both from the aspect of people visiting the site to pray there (including Gentiles; see Kings I, 8:41-2), and the structure itself, it is the opposite of the pillar that is forbidden by the Torah (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 196).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 07, 2018, 02:18:09 AM
Both men and women are equally obligated to keep these commandments, and receive punishment from a Torah-based court if they are convicted of transgressing them (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 75).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 08, 2018, 05:59:44 AM
In the prohibition against eating meat from a living animal, rodents in general cannot be assumed to be included among the eight sheretz creatures that are listed in Leviticus. Rodents in general must, therefore, be considered as wild mammals and not as sheretz animals, since we find that some rodents, such as squirrels, porcupines, etc., are considered wild mammals. Because of this doubt as to the identities of the named sheretz creatures in Lev. 11:29-30, no rodents other than the house mouse, which is definitely a sheretz, can be considered exempt from the prohibition of eiver min ha'hai.

Bats are considered to be in the same category as birds (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 302-303).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 10, 2018, 04:00:03 AM
Similarly, it is permissible to publicize the character of an evil person and his evil deeds, so that other people will be warned about him and will take care not be harmed by him, since the intention is to save others from harm (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 456).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 11, 2018, 06:24:52 AM
In this context see Kuzary III:28-38 for Rabbi Judah Halevi's refutations of the Karaites, a sect which (like the Sadducees before them) claims to recognize the "Written Torah" only. He points out the inconsistencies and self-contradictions of their position, the unavoidable dependency on tradition (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 40). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 12, 2018, 08:17:44 AM
There is a fundamental difference between a person's liability to punishment in a court of law, and his power to cleanse his soul from liability in the eyes of G-d. As with any sin, the sin of a Gentile thief in the judgment of G-d can be removed by proper repentance, but only if the stolen object is returned, or if its value is paid back when returning it intact is not possible (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 565).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 13, 2018, 07:48:11 AM
See Shulhan Aruh Ha'Rav, Laws of Torah Study ch. 2, in Kuntres Aharon 1, that Rambam wrote Mishneh Torah as a practical Torah-law guide, and his opinion is that from learning his Mishneh Torah one could know the final Torah Laws without the reasons; see there. In the Shulhan Aruh Ha'Rav, loc. cit., it explains the statement by the Sages that "a (Jewish) person should divide his time for Torah study into thirds (i.e. three parts): Written Torah (the Hebrew Bible), "Mishnah," and "Gemara." There it explains that "Mishnah" as a general term includes any part of the Oral Torah that is recorded for the sake of basic knowledge. This includes those texts that present the opinions of established Torah Sages on Torah Laws in brief, without their explanations, like Mishneh Torah, Tur and Shulhan Aruh.

However, those sources that explain the reasons for the Torah Laws, such as Rosh and Beit Yosef, and those texts that explain the details of the Shulhan Aruh, are considered to be within the part of Torah that is called "Gemara" as a general term (which includes the Talmud, Midrash and Zohar).

According to this categorization, we can explain that anything that is within the part of Torah that is "Mishnah" is permitted for a pious Gentile to learn, because he is not delving into Torah; rather, he is just learning a text that teaches about Torah Law without its depth and reasons, as can be found in specific classic works, including Rambam's Mishneh Torah, Rabbi Yosef Karo's Shulhan Aruh, and certainly the Kitzur ("Abridged") Shulhan Aruh by Rabbi Shlomo Ganzfried, and likewise the Tractates of Mishnah itself by Rabbi Yehudah the Prince, without its subsequent explanations.

However, the explanations of the Mishnah, such as those of Rabbi Ovadiah Bartenurah, are considered part of "Gemara," as is explained in Likutei Sihot vol. 36, p. 17, because they explain the reasons and depth of the Mishnah.

But the Talmud itself, and the books of those codifiers who write in depth about the reasoning of the Torah Laws, like the Shulhan Aruh Ha'Rav, the Aruh Hashulhan, and the Mishnah Berurah, are definitely forbidden for Gentiles to learn, because this is called "delving into Torah."

This categorization is defined in responsa Mahaneh Hayim vol. 1, ch. 7. (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 88).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 14, 2018, 09:49:55 AM
If a miracle occurs for a Gentile and he returns to that place after an interval of a month or more, he may recite: Blessed are You, Lord our G-d, King of the universe, Who performed a miracle for me in this place (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 101-102).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 15, 2018, 10:18:56 AM
The day I received Volume I of "The Divine Code" was the turning point for me as a Noahide. Until then, I was looking into The Seven Commandments, finding it intriguing. But by reading "The Divine Code, Volume I," I realized I am a Noahide, that this is the real thing, and that G-d put "a new song into my mouth" (Psalms 40:4).

— Ole Mads Sirks Vevle, Regional Assistant, United Noahide Academies (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, back cover).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 16, 2018, 03:21:17 PM
What was the mistake of Enosh and his generation? In his days, mankind made a great mistake, and the wise men of that generation gave thoughtless and spiritually erroneous advice. They said that since G-d created the stars and the planets with which to control the world, and He put them in the heavens and treated them with honor, making them servants who minister before Him, it is therefore proper to praise them, glorify them, and treat them with honor. These people also said that it is the will of G-d that mankind should honor and make great those whom He magnified and honored, just as a king desires that the servants who stand before him will be honored, for doing so is an expression of honor to the king.

Once they thought this, they began to build places of worship for the stars and to offer sacrifices to them. They would praise and glorify them with words, and prostrate themselves before them, because by doing so, they would – according to their false conception – be fulfilling the will of G-d.

This was the essence of the worship of false gods, and this was the reasoning of those who worshiped them, and the explanation they gave. They did not say that there is no other god except for this star they were worshiping. This is what Jeremiah conveyed: "Who would not fear You, O King of the nations? For [kingship] benefits You, for among all the wise men of the nations and in all their kingdoms, [it is known that] there is none like You. But in one concept they are foolish and stupid; the vain [idols] which they teach are but wood." This means that all people knew that G-d alone exists, but it was from their mistake and their foolishness that they said that this vanity of theirs (the concept of independent intermediaries and the worship of idols) was G-d's will (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 139-140).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 18, 2018, 10:04:34 AM
Likewise, a teacher who is educating a minor student, in a field of study or trade, may strike the student in order to teach him. Both a father who strikes his child, and a teacher who strikes his student, must do so only in a light manner without cruelty. To strike a child strongly or with cruelty is not the way of education, but rather anger and revenge, and it is forbidden (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 446).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 19, 2018, 09:01:19 PM
It is not only idol worship that one is forbidden to stray after. It is also forbidden for a person to dwell upon any thought in his heart that causes him to abandon one of the fundamentals of the Torah faith. If one reflects on such thoughts and ideas without trying to remove his mind from them, he might start to be drawn after falsehood. For a person's knowledge is limited, and not all minds can completely understand the truth of G-d on an intellectual level. If every individual would go after the fancies of his own thoughts, the world would be destroyed by their short-mindedness.

How so? Sometimes a person strays after idol worship; sometimes he questions G-d's oneness, whether He is really one or two, or if He has a body. A person may sometimes think about a false prophecy, to question whether it is true or not. If he doesn't know the ways to arrive at the knowledge of the truth on his own, he will come to apostasy if he refuses to accept what is fundamental - including the historical facts of G-d's revelation at Mount Sinai, His speaking of the Ten Commandments to the Jewish nation, and His appointment of Moses to transmit the Written and Oral Torah (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 148).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 21, 2018, 05:41:35 PM
The main restriction against seclusion applies to a married woman and another man, since Gentiles are liable for the severe prohibition of adultery. It is righteous to extend this to seclusion between a single woman and a married or single man, lest they become aroused to commit licentious actions with each other. Since people's hearts are naturally drawn to this, it is therefore the practice of pious people to be especially cautious (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 548-549).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 23, 2018, 06:13:58 PM
Every person has natural traits, and there are other traits that one acquires by regularly habituating himself to act in these ways. A person must always evaluate his traits and strive to bring them toward the correct path.

How so? One must especially strive not to become angered or to be an angry person, for these traits are despicable and they destroy one's life. Therefore, the Sages taught that anyone who gets angry suffers the departure of his intellect, and this type of a life is greatly lacking. If one is naturally an angry person, he should train himself not to get angry at all, and he should force himself to act with humility and patience toward others by habit, until he permanently acquires these good traits. Likewise with other character traits, one should evaluate himself truthfully to determine if he acts as a righteous person would, and he should correct himself to act in a way that finds favor in the eyes of G-d and in the eyes of other people (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 121).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 25, 2018, 12:59:08 AM
The truth of the existence of created beings is relative and subsidiary to, and a result of, the truth of His Being. For they exist only because, and as long as, it is His will that they exist. The creation and sustained existence of the spiritual and physical realms is only a result of G-d's speech (Gen. ch. 1) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 47). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 26, 2018, 07:03:08 AM
Likewise, it is forbidden to give bad advice to a person, that will cause him harm, as it says* "Before a blind person, do not put a stumbling block" — meaning that if a person is "blind" in a certain matter, do not give him wrong advice in that area which would cause him to be unwittingly damaged.

* Leviticus 19:14, and this is logically prohibited.

Rabbi Zalman Nehemiah Goldberg notes that it is clear that the verse "Before a blind person, do not put a stumbling block," does not constitute a Torah-law prohibition upon Gentiles, as explained by Tosafot and Rema Yoreh De'ah 151, and Tractate Avodah Zarah ch. 1, that one may sell an item used for idol worship to a Gentile if there is no suspicion that he will use it in this function, and this is even permissible if it is known that he will sell it to a third party who will surely use it in idol-worship. In the comparative case for a Jew, there would be a prohibition on the original seller because of, "Before a blind person, do not put a stumbling block."

On the other hand, it is possible that it is even forbidden for a Gentile to give another person bad advice, because it can be considered stealing, since it can cause the person to suffer a loss. Misleading one to sin, however, does not constitute this prohibition, since the one who is sinning is responsible for his own actions. This is explained by Ahiezer and by the Ponoviz'er Rav (Rabbi Shlomo Kahanaman) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 449).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 28, 2018, 03:41:56 AM
The Tetragrammaton is the essential four-letter Name of G-d (Y-H-V-H), which was uttered only by the kohanim (Jewish priests) at certain points of their service in the Holy Temple of Jerusalem. Beyond this prescribed usage one is not allowed to pronounce this Name as it is written, thus also known as "the ineffable Name." In sacred service, as public Torah-readings, it is substituted by the Name Ado-nai, and in vernacular speech and writing by the Hebrew term HaShem (lit. "the Name"), which is also the general non-sacred substitution for the term "G-d." (In this and other Names of G-d in Hebrew, one or more dashes or apostrophes are inserted in the word to avoid writing an actual Divine Name that is forbidden to be erased or dishonored.) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 259).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 29, 2018, 03:33:51 AM
If one creates or upholds a new religion, he is liable for this transgression, and he should be warned about this. However, this transgression by itself does not make a person liable for capital punishment from a court (unless he violates one of the Seven Noahide Commandments through an act that is a capital sin).

Anyone who creates a new religion denies the command of G-d to all nations to keep the Seven Noahide Commandments, and transgresses the essential commandment of them all. Even if a new religion includes observing the Noahide Commandments, they are not being observed because they were commanded by G-d and revealed through Moses, but rather because of this newly created religion. It is therefore forbidden to preserve any newly created religion (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 194-195).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 30, 2018, 07:01:51 AM
Normally one is punished only for offences involving an action. The sin of blasphemy, however, is one of a very small group of offences where speech on its own is deemed tantamount to criminal action. While actual articulation alone in this context will incur full penalty, blasphemous thoughts, too, are serious sins (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 260).             
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 01, 2018, 06:08:06 AM
What is considered a holy Name (other than the Explicit Name), and what is considered an attributive name? The holy Names of G-d (specifically in Hebrew) are those that are forbidden to be erased after they are written down in a permanent fashion. In addition to the Explicit Name (Y-H-V-H or Ado-nai), these Names are Ai-l, E-lohim, E-loha, Sha-dai, Tziva-ot, Ehe-yeh and Y-ah, as well as any variant of E-lohim, such as E-lohehah ("your G-d," if "your" is singular), or E-lohaihem ("your G-d," if "your" is plural), or E-lohainu ("our G-d") − all these have the same holiness as the Name E-lohim.

The attributive names are "the Merciful One," "the Compassionate One," "the Creator," and the like, and any other attributive name (including a name in any language other than Hebrew) by which a person clearly is referring to G-d, Who is the Creator of the universe (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 264).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 02, 2018, 03:51:01 PM
Capturing animals and putting them in a zoo for human pleasure appears to be permitted, since this human benefit overrides the animal's discomfort. Likewise, it is permitted to raise docile animals in captivity, since a person has pleasure in seeing these animals, and it can alleviate a person's loneliness. This is not comparable to one who hunts animals needlessly, even though a person gets pleasure from hunting, since by hunting he derives pleasure from the actual suffering of the animal, which is forbidden. In contrast, for animals in a zoo or raised in captivity, the person derives pleasure from seeing or being with the animal, and a small discomfort caused to an animal by not living in its natural habitat is overridden by the benefit to the person (who has a pet) or to large numbers of people (who visit a zoo).

Needless to say, a zoo or a pet owner should not subject an animal to cruelly inhumane conditions. Rather, there is a responsibility to provide a reasonable degree of comfort to the animal (and doing so will also increase the pleasure which people will be able to derive from the animal) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 350-351).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 03, 2018, 12:16:06 PM
In any Gentile marriage, if the two partners wish to separate, they may divorce at any time that either so desires. When the man sends the woman away from his house with the intention that she should not return to him, or when she leaves of her own accord with the intention not to return, they become separated, and she is considered divorced and single, and is not married anymore in the judgment of Torah Law. Within the Noahide Code, there is no need for Gentiles to have a divorce document. Nevertheless, it is preferable if there is a formal civil procedure for divorce in the society (such as a legal document or court record) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 527).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 04, 2018, 10:09:13 AM
Starting in the 1960's, this brash new vision — masked as either civil rights, diversity, or tolerance — has inundated western society with a barrage of propaganda and half-truths that are carefully designed to convince us (contrary to the weight of clinical evidence) that homosexuality, transgenderism, incest, bestiality, pedophilia, and many other sexual "freedoms" are simply alternative lifestyles that must be accepted as genetically predetermined and therefore entitled to the same degree and kind of protection as racial and religious diversity. However, such false messages run directly contrary to G-d's eternal truths and, indeed, our own common sense. By tolerating a permissive sexual agenda, we ignore at our peril the warning of the prophet Isaiah who said (5:20), "Woe to those who speak of evil as good and of good as evil; who make darkness into light and light into darkness; they make bitter into sweet and sweet into bitter!" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 466).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Noachide on July 05, 2018, 04:21:33 AM
Starting in the 1960's, this brash new vision — masked as either civil rights, diversity, or tolerance — has inundated western society with a barrage of propaganda and half-truths that are carefully designed to convince us (contrary to the weight of clinical evidence) that homosexuality, transgenderism, incest, bestiality, pedophilia, and many other sexual "freedoms" are simply alternative lifestyles that must be accepted as genetically predetermined and therefore entitled to the same degree and kind of protection as racial and religious diversity. However, such false messages run directly contrary to G-d's eternal truths and, indeed, our own common sense. By tolerating a permissive sexual agenda, we ignore at our peril the warning of the prophet Isaiah who said (5:20), "Woe to those who speak of evil as good and of good as evil; who make darkness into light and light into darkness; they make bitter into sweet and sweet into bitter!" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 466).
This paragraph and one before are my favourite in all Introductions of the Divine Code. I always come back to them and gladly read it.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 05, 2018, 08:14:10 AM
Just as it is forbidden to harm someone (as part of the prohibition against murder), it is also forbidden to cause another person suffering through one's speech. This is morally and logically binding, as Hillel said as a summary of the entire Torah, "What is hateful to you, do not do to your friend."

It is forbidden to humiliate or embarrass another person, even if only with words, or to call another person by a name that is embarrassing to him, or to tell him something that is embarrassing to him.

The Sages said, "One who causes his fellow to pale in public does not have a portion in the World to Come," meaning that (a) one is forbidden to insult another person with words to an extent that his facial appearance changes, and (b) this is punishable by G-d (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 453-454).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 05, 2018, 09:29:03 AM
This paragraph and one before are my favourite in all Introductions of the Divine Code. I always come back to them and gladly read it.

Here is the paragraph you mentioned: We live in a strange time, a time when moral relativism appears to be ascending and moral absolutes descending. The culture in which we live has created a world with an unprecedented confusion of values, accelerated by social changes occurring at a pace that would have been unimaginable even a generation ago. This new vision of morality (which, in reality, mirrors much of ancient paganism) is often rationalized as a virtually all-permissive, "anything goes" social system founded on a concept of universal "tolerance." Unfortunately, this concept of tolerance is, in actuality, simply a facade used to mask an agenda of sexual licentiousness (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 466).

When I was a boy, I did not see LGBT communities in Croatia. Now my neighborhood has an LGBT center and an LGBT club. 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Noachide on July 06, 2018, 05:18:51 AM
Here is the paragraph you mentioned: We live in a strange time, a time when moral relativism appears to be ascending and moral absolutes descending. The culture in which we live has created a world with an unprecedented confusion of values, accelerated by social changes occurring at a pace that would have been unimaginable even a generation ago. This new vision of morality (which, in reality, mirrors much of ancient paganism) is often rationalized as a virtually all-permissive, "anything goes" social system founded on a concept of universal "tolerance." Unfortunately, this concept of tolerance is, in actuality, simply a facade used to mask an agenda of sexual licentiousness (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 466).

When I was a boy, I did not see LGBT communities in Croatia. Now my neighborhood has an LGBT center and an LGBT club.
In my country we have gay parades, lesbian Prime Minister and someone from government, not that long ago, announced that Serbia will adopt gay marriages. Still situation is better than in Western countries.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 06, 2018, 12:56:57 PM
It is permissible for a Gentile to prostrate to G-d, whether he is doing so in prayer or not. If he prostrates to G-d when he is not praying, he should do it in a manner of honor and awe. And when he bows down to G-d, he should not include in this prostration any words other than prayer, thanks, or praise to G-d (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 96).   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 06, 2018, 01:15:48 PM
In my country we have gay parades, lesbian Prime Minister and someone from government, not that long ago, announced that Serbia will adopt gay marriages. Still situation is better than in Western countries.

We have gay parades. But we banned gay marriages. I agree the situation is better in Eastern Europe.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 07, 2018, 05:58:32 PM
It is forbidden for a person to tell lies, or act in a smooth-tongued and luring manner in order to deceive or persuade. One should not speak one thing outwardly and think otherwise in his heart. Rather, his inner self should be like his image that he shows to the world. He may not deceive people, and instead he should always pursue truthfulness (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 122). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 09, 2018, 08:48:07 AM
It is the practice of idol worshipers to make a mark on themselves or to tattoo their bodies as a sign of idol worship, e.g. to show that they are servants who are sold to the idol and marked for its service. It is also their practice to cut themselves with vessels and wound their bodies, and to scratch themselves for their idols. All these practices are rituals of idol worship even though they are not its main rituals, and they are therefore forbidden as idolatrous practices if one intends it for idolatry. (One is generally forbidden to wound himself, with a few exceptions - e.g., circumcision or cosmetic surgery.)

It is also forbidden for one to wear a specific garment that is worn by idol worshipers in the name of their idol, if he intends to do so for that purpose (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 248).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 10, 2018, 10:46:57 AM
A person should not say, "I will steal and apportion the money to poor people," for this is considered doing "a mitzvah (meaning, a meritorious and good deed) that comes about through a sin." This is disgusting and hateful in the eyes of G-d, and is not considered a good deed at all (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 573).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 11, 2018, 12:01:35 PM
It is also forbidden to steal from relatives or to take something of theirs without their knowledge, to use it without permission. This applies even if one knows with certainty that if his relative learned that he did this, the relative would be happy that he benefited in this way. As long as permission has not been given, this is forbidden as theft (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 572). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Lisa on July 11, 2018, 08:18:13 PM
Jews are still not allowed to eat these animals you listed, whether they're alive or already killed/slaughtered.  Of course non Jews can eat shell fish.  But once shrimps are fished out if the water wouldn't they already be dead?  I know that lobsters are taken alive from fish tanks and boiled to death in hot water.  That doesn't sit well with me.  As for snakes, are there people anywhere that eat them regularly?

The prohibition against flesh from a living animal does not apply to: arthropods (e.g. shrimp, lobsters, insects); reptiles (e.g. snakes, lizards); amphibians (e.g. frogs); mollusks (e.g. snails, squid, octopus, clams, oysters, scallops); annelids (e.g. worms); fish; jellyfish; or starfish (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 301).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 12, 2018, 07:30:35 AM
Jews are still not allowed to eat these animals you listed, whether they're alive or already killed/slaughtered.  Of course non Jews can eat shell fish.  But once shrimps are fished out if the water wouldn't they already be dead?  I know that lobsters are taken alive from fish tanks and boiled to death in hot water.  That doesn't sit well with me.  As for snakes, are there people anywhere that eat them regularly?

Of course, some topics apply to both Jews and Gentiles, but this book only comes to teach the Noahide Code. Jews should not use this text to determine their own obligations, which are more restrictive and numerous.

It seems that shrimps do not die immediately when they are fished out of the water. If one wishes to kill any living creature for the purpose of eating it, he has no permission to be cruel and cause it needless suffering in the process. An example would be one who keeps live lobsters, and when he wishes to prepare them for food he drops them alive into a pot of boiling water.

If there is a needed benefit for a person to do so, even such as the case of certain creatures whose taste is better when they are boiled alive, it is not forbidden to do so. If not, one is obligated to kill the animal first in a less painful way, even if this takes a little extra effort, since this is not enough of an excuse to permit causing such suffering to a living creature. The Rabbinical term for such an act is the causing of "tza'ar ba'alei hayim." 

I think that snakes are eaten regularly in China and West Africa, but I am not sure. 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 12, 2018, 12:03:42 PM
As implied from the statement of the Torah, "And you shall rule over the fish of the sea, the fowl of the heavens, and all beasts that swarm on the earth," Adam was granted dominion over all living things and given permission to use them to perform any labor or tasks. Noah was also granted permission to kill an animal to eat any part of its flesh, and to use portions of its body for other useful purposes (for example, its hide for clothing and its bones to fashion utensils). Mankind was not, however, granted permission to kill or wound any animals purposelessly, or to cause them unnecessary pain. This is not permitted with regard to any animal, even fish, sheretz creatures, reptiles, or other small crawling creatures (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 345).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 13, 2018, 03:29:33 PM
With the ascent of the Jews to nationhood in the Land of Israel, the surrounding nations, and especially the people from those nations who chose to take up residence in the Holy Land, returned to an awareness of the Seven Noahide Commandments. As the Jews encountered national successes and failures during the 440 years preceding, and the 410 years following, the construction of the First Holy Temple by King Solomon, the appeal of the Noahide Code among the surrounding nations waxed and waned (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 20).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 14, 2018, 07:34:27 PM
During the time of the Second Holy Temple (350 B.C.E.- 70 C.E.), a large movement of "Heaven Fearers" was active in the Roman Empire. These were Gentile adherents to the One G-d of Israel, who directed their religious loyalty to the Jewish Sages and the Holy Temple. It is nearly impossible to find any unbiased sources on this subject outside of the Talmud and Midrash, because after the Temple's destruction, these Torah-observant Gentiles became prime targets of the enforcers of the pagan Roman religion, and later of the missionizing activities of innovative new religions which began to vie for the Divinely appointed authority of the Torah tradition. The best non-Torah historical accounts of the "Heaven Fearers" are found in the writings of Josephus (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 20).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 16, 2018, 07:14:38 AM
But a Gentile who does not observe his seven commandments, even if he learns about them but not for the sake of fulfilling them, is indeed sinful, and he will be punished by the Hand of Heaven for this Torah learning. If he serves idols (or follows other paths of heresy), and nevertheless involves himself in Torah learning, he is liable for capital punishment by the Hand of Heaven (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 92).     
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 17, 2018, 03:46:24 PM
Modern-day slavery is a severe and widespread problem. Especially grave is the sin of kidnapping young girls, G-d forbid, and selling them for sex slavery (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 504).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 19, 2018, 01:04:18 AM
The prohibition of theft is unique in that it affects almost every aspect of a person's life, since humans are social beings who must deal with each other continuously, in buying, selling, exchanging, etc. One is always dealing with others, either in person or remotely. The focus of this commandment is to accept and honor another person, his needs, and his possessions. As the Sages taught (Tractate Avot 2:12): "Rabbi Yosay said: Let the money of your fellow be as dear to you as your own." Theft in its different forms causes corruption that deteriorates and endangers the society, until the brink of destruction (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 562). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 20, 2018, 05:10:34 AM
This lesson was learned by humanity in ancient times, from the generation of the flood. From what occurred to them, we see how harsh is the punishment for theft. The decree of their annihilation was only sealed because they committed rampant theft, even though they were very sinful with respect to all of their divine commandments, as it says (Gen. 6:13), "The end of all flesh has come before Me because the world is full of robbery, and behold, I will destroy the world" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 562). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 21, 2018, 01:42:00 AM
It is also prohibited for a Jew to teach Torah to Gentiles in the canonized Hebrew or Aramaic text (see Tractate Hagigah 13), either because of the inherent holiness of the Torah's Hebrew letters and its precise wording, or because they may cause others to err if they know how to read the original text and as a result go on to give their own explanations and interpretations of the Written or Oral Torah. However, here we are mainly speaking about a sincere and pious Gentile who wants to learn Torah on his own in translated books. We can add that after the Torah was translated into Greek as the Septuagint, it is permitted to learn Torah in one's own language from a proper translation (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 87). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 22, 2018, 04:26:38 AM
All the books of deviant believers are forbidden to be read (except for specific purposes), for they are full of idolatry and denial of the True G-d. It is obligatory to destroy them, so that there will remain no remembrance of idol worship and heresy (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 146). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 24, 2018, 01:31:26 AM
The reason why one may not read the books of the deviant believers is because of the prohibition "Do not turn to the idols," meaning that it is prohibited to contemplate how to serve their idols. However, it is permitted to learn the actions and precepts of the idol worship from these books (or from those who serve it) if it is in order to keep away from those things, as the Sages explain the verse, "Do not learn to follow the abominations of these nations," - it is forbidden to learn in order to do, but it is permitted to learn, understand and teach in order to be wary of a false prophet or magician who performs apparent miracles by magic in support of some idolatry. It is also permitted to learn such things in order to be wary of them, and to save one's self from mistakenly transgressing the prohibition of idol worship.

It is prohibited to learn anything from a deviant believer who is attached to idol worship, who proselytizes others to serve his idol, for this brings one to heresy. Even the permission to learn about idolatrous practices in order to carefully avoid them, mentioned in the previous topic, only applies when it does not involve learning from someone who has a strong attachment to idol worship; rather, it only applies to learning factual information about topics of magic or idol worship that one might be likely to encounter, and usually this can be learned from books on these subjects (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 146-147).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 24, 2018, 04:49:04 AM
All types of same-sex erotic contact are forbidden, as will be explained. Anyone struggling with the emotional, physiological and/or psychological dimensions of SSA (same-sex attraction) is encouraged to read Light in the Closet: Torah, Homosexuality and the Power to Change. This book addresses 23 categories of "sexual brokenness," which are behaviors, desires or fantasies that are inconsistent with the Torah's designation of heterosexual marriage as the only context for intercourse that is blessed by G-d. It insists that no one should be denied the right to receive information on, and access to, the known effective means of gender-reaffirming counseling and treatment for sexual disorientation. It includes discussions of relevant Torah Law for Jews and Gentiles, and indicts the permissive (or even promotive) attitudes, found in many countries, about indulgence in homosexual relations (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 485). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 26, 2018, 03:26:01 PM
Orthodox Rabbis agree that homosexual acts bring harm upon a person and that professional counseling should be available to help individuals overcome SSA; see Sihot in English, vol. 30, p. 120-130. The National Association for Research and Therapy of Homosexuality (narth.com) and JONAH (Jews Offering New Alternatives for Healing; jonahweb.org) work for the right of anyone with unwanted SSA to receive effective therapeutic treatment, and for the right of professionals to offer that care. Abundant information, including resources to locate participating local therapists, is available on these sites (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 485). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 27, 2018, 04:32:09 PM
One may not disgrace a holy Name of G-d written in any language, for example, by putting it in the garbage or in an unclean place such a restroom (meaning a place that is designated and used for excrement or for baths or showers), and the same applies to all written verses from the holy Hebrew Bible. If there is a need to dispose of them, one should bury them in a container, or conceal them in earthenware vessels, which is like burial.

The same also applies to the texts of the Oral Torah, such as the Mishnah, Talmud, works of Torah Law, and any traditional Jewish prayer book (which is called a Siddur in Hebrew, meaning "order," because it gives a set order for the prayer services) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 274-275).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 28, 2018, 05:35:01 AM
In a note that Rambam wrote on his Commentary on the Mishnah, published in Rav Kapach's edition, he explained, "Know that one of the great fundamental principles of the Torah of Moses is that our universe is a new entity, created and formed by G-d out of absolute nothingness. ... the non-existence of the universe before the beginning of time ... proves G-d's existence absolutely, as explained in the Guide for the Perplexed" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 46). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 29, 2018, 07:31:38 AM
This concept is because of the special status of the "Torah of Moses," as Rambam describes and explains in Laws of Foundations of the Torah, Chapter 9. G-d sealed the Divine Commandments when He commanded mankind with the giving of the Torah to Moses, and He established that He will never send or command a prophet to alter any one of the Torah's commandments. This point, which G-d also commanded to Moses at Mount Sinai (Deuteronomy 13:1), established the Torah of the Jews as the source for His sealed commandments. This is true also in regard to the Seven Noahide Commandments, but only because of the unique transmittal of His commands to mankind through Moses at the public national revelation at Mount Sinai, as explained above. Without G-d's sealing of the Seven Noahide Commandments in the Torah, they would not truly be His eternal word, because of the possibility that they might be changed or added to (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 34-35).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 30, 2018, 12:12:16 PM
Any natural object that is not manmade and which was not physically altered in the service of an idol does not become forbidden for benefit, even if it is worshiped. Therefore, if idolaters worshiped mountains, hills, trees which grew naturally or were originally planted for a non-idolatrous purpose (for example, for their fruit, shade, etc.), public or private springs (since they are attached to the ground), a river, or an animal, then such things are still permitted for benefit (even though those who worship such things in nature are idol worshipers in the full sense, and are liable for a capital sin) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 212). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 01, 2018, 01:47:16 PM
Any tree (including a non-fruit tree) planted beside an idol, or beside an idol's altar or house of worship, is a forbidden decoration for the idol, and is therefore an asherah.

Likewise, trees that are brought into houses of worship to celebrate the birthday of Yeshua are forbidden as long as they remain there. In private houses or businesses, it appears that they are not forbidden for benefit if they bear no symbols of the religion, if they are only used as a custom and not as an aid in worshiping with prayers or songs. They would certainly be permitted for benefit after being discarded (a clear act of nullification) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 216).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 02, 2018, 11:19:51 AM
Meat or wine that had been set aside specifically to be offerings to an idol are not forbidden for benefit, even if they were brought into the temple of the idol. Once they have been offered, though, they have the status of a sacrifice. If the worshipers then moved them from the idol's temple to continue their service or to benefit from them (for example, to eat them), they are forbidden for benefit forever (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 226). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 03, 2018, 04:39:50 PM
It appears that it is forbidden to take merchandise and leave a prepared check as payment without permission, because the owner does not wish to receive checks in the same way he anticipates to be paid with cash. It is obvious that the buyer is not allowed to leave his own merchandise or belongings without permission as payment for the merchandise he is buying, because a seller wants money as payment, not other items. However, if it is known that the owner agrees to a certain means of payment, by receiving a check or specific items in exchange for his sold merchandise, then it is permissible (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 576). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 04, 2018, 04:50:10 PM
In regard to leaving one's credit card information for payment, this would depend on the individual business. Some businesses consistently (or at some times) consider a credit card payment as equivalent to cash, or even better than cash. The deciding factor is the policy of the merchant (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 576).     
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 06, 2018, 04:47:19 AM
A man is forbidden to have close physical contact with a "forbidden relation" (i.e. any woman whom Torah Law forbids him to cohabit with), even if the contact is in ways other than cohabiting, such as hugging or kissing, or touching her body in a way of desire, as it may lead him to cohabit with her. Of course they may not sleep together, even if they are sleeping in their clothes, as all these actions lead one to sin (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 540).   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 08, 2018, 01:23:03 AM
He must likewise distance himself from all actions that arouse his inclination to desire sinful cohabitation: he may not beckon to a forbidden relation with his hand, or wink at her, joke with her, or become lightheaded with her, and he may not gaze at her beauty, because all these actions can lead one to sin.

Just as it is forbidden for a man to do these things, it is also forbidden for a woman to do such actions that will arouse a man to desire to sin with her (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 540-541).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 09, 2018, 02:37:13 AM
It is an obligation on every person to save another person from bodily or life-threatening damage. If one sees another person walking in a dangerous area, he must alert the other person, and if one sees another person drowning, he must attempt to save him in any way that he is able.

This can be logically deduced from the law that permits one to kill a pursuer, which shows that it is a moral responsibility - and therefore, one which applies to Gentiles as well. This is also implied from Tractate Sanhedrin 72b, where it is explained, based on the verse Gen. 9:6 ("Whoever sheds the blood of man, by man his blood shall be shed"), that one is obligated to save the victim by taking the life of the pursuer. This obligation is included in the Noahide prohibition of murder. This logic can be found in Hasdei David Tosefta of Korbanot ch. 13, that it is a positive obligation deduced from the negative commandment that prohibits murder (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 449-450).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 10, 2018, 12:53:47 AM
The obligation is only to expend effort, but a Gentile is not obligated to spend money to save another person* if he will not be reimbursed. However, one is obligated to spend money to save another person with the assumption that it will be paid back, and it is obvious that one can use the victim's own money to save him.

One is not obligated to put himself in mortal danger to save another person.

*Shulhan Aruh Ha'Rav, Laws of Bodily Damage topic 8.

Rabbi Zalman Nehemiah Goldberg notes that it appears that the obligation to expend effort to help another person falls under the category of returning a lost object (in which Gentiles are not obligated), as explained in Tractate Sanhedrin 73a and Shulhan Aruh Ha'Rav ibid.

The author responds that although it is true that this obligation and that of saving another's life are the two sources in this area regarding Jews, and they are both not binding for Gentiles, they are still obligations within the prohibition of murder, or from pure moral logic (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 450).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 11, 2018, 01:51:42 AM
A number of texts discuss the reasons for the Divine injunction to keep this as an oral tradition; see, e.g., Midrash Tanhuma Ki Tissa 34; Midrash Shemot Rabbah 47:1; Rambam, Guide for the Perplexed I: beginning of ch. 71; Rabbi Joseph Albo, Sefer Ha'Ikarim III:23; Rabbi Judah Lowe, Tiferet Yisrael, ch. 68-69. The historical change of eventually committing the Oral Torah to writing (the Talmud) was necessitated by the drastic deterioration of social conditions after the destruction of the Second Temple and the dispersion of Israel. (See Tractate Temurah 14b.) It became difficult for the Torah scholars to concentrate and rely on memory and transmission alone, and there was a serious threat that the tradition would be distorted and forgotten: "The number of disciples kept diminishing, ever new calamities came about, the Roman government expanded in the world, becoming ever stronger, and the Israelites wandered and became dispersed to the ends of the world. He (Rabbi Yehudah the Prince) therefore composed a (highly condensed) work (the Mishnah) to be available to all, so that they would be able to study it speedily and (the vast amount of details) would not be forgotten" (Rambam, Introduction to his Mishneh Torah). The continuing deterioration of social conditions necessitated the composition of the Talmud, and the later Rabbinical commentaries and codifications, in order to preserve the understanding of the Oral Torah for subsequent generations of Jews (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 41).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 13, 2018, 02:19:57 AM
The very idea of a Noahide Code per se, then, presupposes acknowledgment of both the "Written Torah" and its inseparable corollary of the tradition of the "Oral Torah." Without these there is no authentic Noahide Code. Without the foundation of a firm belief in the Revelation at Sinai of both the written text of the Torah and the authentic tradition of its explication, there is no code prescribing a truly moral or religious system for mankind (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 43-45). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 14, 2018, 05:58:48 AM
What is meant by mentioning G-d's Name "in vain"? This means mentioning a Divine Name for no need at all. However, to mention it in a way of praise or prayer is permitted. It is likewise permitted to bless one's friend with G-d's Name, by saying "G-d bless you," and the like.

Therefore, one who erred and mentioned G-d's Name for no reason should immediately praise and give honor to Him, in order that the mentioning of His Name should not be in vain. For example, if one said "G-d," he should immediately say, "Blessed is He forever," or "Who is great and very exalted" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 270-271).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 15, 2018, 12:29:32 PM
It is forbidden to destroy holy Names and writings, as this is a disgrace to G-d's honor and profanes His Name. Minhat Hinuh Commandment 69 (in his Kometz Minha) writes that one who erases G-d's Name has done no less of a transgression than one who mentions His Name in vain, and both are thus clearly forbidden for Gentiles.

The Hebrew Names which may not be destroyed are: Y-H-V-H, Ado-nai, Ai-l, E-lohim, E-lohah, Sha-dai, Tziva-ot, Ehe-yeh, and Y-ah, and any of the possessive versions of E-lohim, such as Elo-hehah, or E-lohaihem, or E-lohainu and the like; even to erase one letter from one of these Names is forbidden.

However, if one only wrote part of a Name, such as "Shad" from Sha-dai, or "Eh" from Eh-yeh, or "Ado" from Ado-nai, since he does not complete the Names, he may erase them if there is a need to do so. However, it is forbidden to disgrace them (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 273-274).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 16, 2018, 06:23:27 AM
When the head of an animal has been severed, i.e., its esophagus, windpipe, spine, and veins have been cut through, even though it is still attached to the trunk by the skin, the animal is certainly dead even though its heart continues beating for several moments. The prohibition against meat or organs removed from a living animal does not apply to it in this condition.* 

*Mishnah Oholot ch. 1; Tractate Hullin 21a, and Rashi there; Rambam, Laws of Sources of Ritual Impurity, beginning of ch. 2 and 4. This case denotes complete death, and the animal is not considered to be convulsing (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 320).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 17, 2018, 04:35:40 AM
Any Gentile who accepts these Seven Noahide Commandments, and is careful to observe them, is truly a pious individual of the nations of the world, and merits an eternal portion in the future World to Come. (And with this merit, the person will be included in the Resurrection of the Dead).9 This applies only if he accepts them and does them because the Holy One, blessed be He, commanded them in the Torah, and made it known through Moses our teacher, that the Children of Noah were previously commanded to fulfill them.

9 This can be seen from Rashi and Tosafot on Tractate Rosh Hashanah 16b-17a, where they state that the Talmud's words beginning, "There are three groups for the Day of Judgment," refer to the Resurrection of the Dead. Thus the Talmud speaks in reference to the Gentiles as well as the Jews, so it is apparent that Gentiles can have not only a part in the future World to Come, but also in the Resurrection of the Dead. Ra'avad and Ramban, and teachings of Hassidic leaders as well, are of the opinion that the main, eternal reward and revelation of Godliness in the future will be in the physical world, after the Resurrection of the Dead (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 49).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 18, 2018, 04:49:41 AM
However, if one fulfills the commandments of the Noahide Code only out of intellectual conviction (because his logic dictates them), he is forbidden by Torah Law to settle in the land of Israel,11 and he is not counted among the pious individuals of the nations of the world.12,13

11 According to Rambam's Laws of the Worship of Stars (and Idols) 10:6, during the temporary diaspora of the Jewish people (during which the Jubilee cycle is suspended), no one can be accepted into the legal status of a Gentile "Resident" (Ger Toshav in Hebrew) of the Land of Israel. This means that we do not confer upon a Gentile the legal status of a Ger Toshav, even if he makes a declaration before three Torah-observant adult Jewish males that he accepts and abides by the Noahide Code. However, the title Ger Toshav alternatively refers to any Gentile in any location who keeps the Seven Noahide Commandments because they were commanded to Moses in the Torah. For any Gentiles who are not yet on this spiritual level, the Jews are commanded to expel them from the Holy Land of Israel, and they are forbidden by Torah Law to dwell there (whether they are expelled or not).

See Ibn Ezra on Leviticus 18:18,26 and Deuteronomy 31:16, who explains the simple meaning of Leviticus 18:25-28, which says that the holiness of the Land of Israel cannot tolerate sinful inhabitants, and it "disgorges" them. From this is understood that the spiritual standard of any inhabitants of the Land of Israel (including Gentiles) must be on a higher level compared to those who live elsewhere.

12 See Rambam, Laws of Kings 8:11.

13 He lacks this spiritual merit (ibid.), but since he fulfills the Noahide Code in practice, he is not liable to any punishment for this lack of belief (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 50).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Noachide on August 18, 2018, 07:09:11 AM
See Ibn Ezra on Leviticus 18:18,26 and Deuteronomy 31:16, who explains the simple meaning of Leviticus 18:25-28, which says that the holiness of the Land of Israel cannot tolerate sinful inhabitants, and it "disgorges" them. From this is understood that the spiritual standard of any inhabitants of the Land of Israel (including Gentiles) must be on a higher level compared to those who live elsewhere.
I heard once that people in the Land of Israel are judged more strictly by God than elsewhere on Earth.   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 19, 2018, 02:10:15 AM
I heard once that people in the Land of Israel are judged more strictly by God than elsewhere on Earth.

I do not wish to live in Israel. I am happy in Croatia.  :)
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 19, 2018, 06:25:21 AM
Parents are obligated to provide education to their children, and specifically in the fulfillment of the Noahide Code. This education for the children is an obligation within the commandment of dinim, to strengthen the observance of the Noahide precepts in the world (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 83).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 20, 2018, 10:37:59 AM
To the extent that his intellect can grasp, every child should be educated about the foundations of the Noahide faith, and about the infinite greatness of the King of kings, the Holy One, blessed be He, Who is the Source of life for every being. This education and training of the child, before he matures, will serve as a foundation of his service to G-d for his entire life, as it says (Proverbs 22:6): "Educate the child according to his way; even when he will be old he will not depart from it." See, for example, The Principles of Education and Guidance, by Rabbi Yosef Yitzhak Schneersohn, pub. Kehot (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 83).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 21, 2018, 09:07:34 AM
This chapter deals with the Torah Law of animal sacrifice as it is permitted for Gentiles. Since the purpose of this book is to codify and teach every aspect of G-d's Torah Law for Gentiles, this subject is included here. A righteous Gentile may study these precepts on a theoretical level, since even if he does not intend to bring a sacrifice, within this subject he will learn more about each of the Seven Noahide Commandments and other aspects of serving of G-d, as they happen to apply in this area (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 111).   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 22, 2018, 04:33:06 PM
We highly recommend that Gentiles in our days not act on the permission from G-d to sacrifice in the way it is explained here, for at least two reasons.

(1) In order to bring a sacrifice, one should be worthy to approach that close to G-d (with a service that resembles the Jewish priests in the Holy Temple), which is something that is very difficult to achieve in our time. More so, a deed which one takes on voluntarily as an additional service to G-d must be done in an especially sincere and holy way (as written in Shulhan Aruh Orah Hayim 107:4, regarding a Jew who wishes to add an additional prayer service which he is not obligated to recite). If the additional service to G-d is not performed by these higher standards, it will be considered as blemished before Him.

(2) As topic 5 below explains, it is obvious that this type of Torah-based Divine service should be instructed and supervised only by a reliable and expert Orthodox Rabbi, which is very difficult to arrange in our time (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 111).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 23, 2018, 04:04:38 PM
As explained in Part V, topic 9:4, sexual reassignment surgery is forbidden because it is damage to the body that is not medically required, and it is also for a licentious purpose. Sexual reassignment surgery (SRS) does not change the person's status in Torah Law as a male or female. If a man who underwent SRS is the passive partner in anal intercourse with another man, both are liable for the capital sin. If the other man inserts his organ into the transsexual's new "female" orifice, neither is committing the act of the capital sin,66 but it still constitutes forbidden intimate contact.

66 As is the rule for the corresponding intercourse with an androgyne (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 489-490). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 24, 2018, 06:51:09 PM
Likewise, a female who undergoes SRS remains a female. If a male sodomizes her, or if she sodomizes a male with her new "male organ," or if she sodomizes another female who underwent SRS, neither partner has committed the capital sin of male homosexual anal intercourse. Obviously if she enters her new "male organ" into another female, that is not an intercourse that would bring liability for a capital sin (but rather it is forbidden as lesbianism).

Thus a female who transgressed and underwent SRS is only permitted to have relations with a person who was born male (even if that person also transgressed and underwent SRS). Even in surgically reassigned relationships such as these, the partners who are permissibly intimate should be living as a married heterosexual couple.

An androgyne whose male genitals were removed, to leave him resembling a female, still retains his status as an androgyne male (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 490).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 26, 2018, 02:02:59 PM
In Tractate Sanhedrin 56b, it is shown that Adam was prohibited from serving idols by the words, "And the L-rd G-d commanded the man ..." (Genesis 2:16), from which we infer that Adam was prohibited from rebelling against the One who commanded. Rashi explains there that Adam was prohibited from serving idols from these words, with which the Almighty commanded Adam that His Godliness should not be associated with any other entity. This is also clearly cited by Rambam (Laws of Kings 8:10): "Moses was commanded by the Almighty to compel all the inhabitants of the world to accept the (seven universal) commandments given to Noah's descendents." It is therefore obvious that all the nations of the world are commanded to believe in and recognize G-d (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 48). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 27, 2018, 05:30:19 PM
In the same way that a person should praise and bless G-d for all the good he receives, and recognize that these things are from Him, likewise it is an obligation to recognize that also the hurtful and painful things one experiences are also directed by G-d. Even though a person can't fully understand why these difficulties are brought about, he should know and acknowledge that the ways of G-d are beyond the understanding of mankind. Everything that G-d does with a person is in truth an opportunity for the good of the person, as it says: "G-d is righteous in all His ways" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 102). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 29, 2018, 12:58:06 AM
Therefore, a person is obligated to acknowledge that all G-d's judgments are truly just. One should not react to apparent tragedies by denying His existence or His constant Providence, or by spurning Him in retaliation at the time when one experiences apparent evil, for that is the way of heretical and light-minded people who lack understanding (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 102). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 30, 2018, 08:54:20 AM
It is forbidden to provide money to collectors of taxes or tithes for an idol. But one may pay a tax to a ruling power that stipulates that a certain amount from the tax will be used for the sake of idolatry (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 240). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on August 31, 2018, 02:48:26 AM
Adultery with the wife of another man is forbidden for Gentiles (even if the wife has these relations with her own consent and/or with the consent of her husband).76

76 This is meant to distinguish the transgression of adultery from the transgression of kidnapping, and in particular to clarify what commandments are violated if a man commits rape. If a man steals a married woman and forcefully commits relations with her, he is violating two separate capital sins of theft and adultery, but the women is exempt, as explained in Chapter 1 above regarding rape. The case "with the consent of her husband" stresses that even according to the statement in Minhat Hinuh Commandment 35, based on Rashi, adultery with rape is also considered stealing from the husband. Even if the husband consents, the capital sin of adultery still applies, for which the man will be liable. Therefore, if a Gentile married woman who resides with her husband for marriage purposes allows any other men to cohabit with her (for example, if she engages in prostitution), whether or not the husband gives his consent, both the woman and her other partner(s) are liable for adultery (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 492).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 01, 2018, 01:46:21 PM
The practice of some midwives to take an infant in swaddling clothes, and put a spice which does not smell good on a fire, and wave the infant over the spice on the fire, is a type of passing through fire, and is forbidden (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 180). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 02, 2018, 05:43:32 PM
It is best for a person not to swear at all, even if he is not promising in the name of G-d or a term referring to G-d, and if he did swear, he is obligated to fulfill his words. Just as it is best for a person not to swear at all, it is also best for him not to make any vows, as he will find himself obligated to fulfill things that he may possibly be unable to fulfill, and then he will find himself lying about his words. If he does make such a vow, he is obligated to keep his words (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 276-277).   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 03, 2018, 12:46:42 AM
However, someone who finds himself in a desperate situation can vow to G-d in his prayers, so that his promise and intended good deed should stand in his merit to save him from a desperate situation. In this situation, he should say: "I hereby vow that I will do such-and-such, if I will be saved from this problem." Perhaps in the merit of his promised vow, he will be saved.70

70 This is learned from the conduct of Jacob, who made a vow in time of distress (Gen. 28:20) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 277).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 05, 2018, 01:25:26 AM
According to the Torah's Oral Tradition,189 it is forbidden for Gentiles to cross-mate different species of animals (and to cross-graft certain species of trees, as explained in the next chapter). Nevertheless, since these prohibitions are not explicitly stated in the Torah, the Torah does not make Gentiles liable to physical punishment for their violation.190

It is significant that hybridism derives from the Latin hybrida (to insult or outrage).

189 The words "Oral Tradition" here, quoted from the Rambam, refer to the Torah Laws given by G-d to Moses at Sinai that were not written clearly in the Torah, but instead were transmitted orally to the Jewish people by Moses. This is not a reference to later Rabbinical enactments of the Sages. See Rambam, Introduction to the Mishneh Torah.

190 Rambam Laws of Kings ch. 10. A Gentile is liable for a capital sin only if he violates one of the specific seven Biblical Noahide commandments. Violations of other aspects of the Noahide Code (based on the Oral Tradition or later Rabbinical enactments by the Sages) are forbidden, but the Torah does not require these secondary transgressions to be punished in a court of law in the physical world (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 352).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 06, 2018, 04:19:54 AM
The universal prohibition against cross-mating of animals applies to causing the copulation of any male and female of two different species. This applies regardless of whether they are two different species of domestic animals, or two different species of wild animals, or if it is a domestic animal species and a wild animal species. This prohibition encompasses all species that humans can coerce or force to cross-copulate, including land and sea mammals,191 birds,192 and even reptiles and amphibians.193

191 Tur and Perisha Yoreh De'ah ch. 297. But a prohibition of cross-copulation is not applicable to classes of creatures that in general do not mate by vaginal or cloacal copulation; see Tosafot on Tractate Bava Kama 55, regarding fish.

192 Rambam, Laws of Forbidden Mixtures ch. 9; Shulhan Aruh Yoreh De'ah ch. 297.

193 See Tractate Hullin 127a. This is clear, since these are all creatures that the Torah mentions as part of creation with the terminology "according to its kind" (Genesis 1:21, 24, 25) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 352-353).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 07, 2018, 04:04:43 AM
The commandment to fear G-d has a logical basis and is a part of accepting and recognizing Him. It is included in the Noahide prohibition against blasphemy, as explained below in Chapter 2 of Part III, according to Sefer Ha'Hinuh, Commandment 432 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 93).   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 08, 2018, 08:16:28 AM
Kol Bo'ai Ha'Olom, p. 45, says that a Gentile is obligated in prayer and repentance as part of his commandment to believe in G-d and the negation of idols. It is possible that the discussion there is mainly in regard to prayer, but the obligation of repentance derives from the "essence of the commandment" - that it is a general obligation for a person to recognize G-d and His precepts (not as a part of any specific command), and therefore automatically, if one errs, he is required to correct his ways in order to keep G-d's commandments, at least from then on. (The "essence of the commandment" refers to a basic aspect of G-d's issuance of commandments to mankind: the very fact that mankind's Creator issues commands is the reason that mankind is obligated to follow those commands, above and beyond any specific details of what He has commanded. Here also, the obligation to repent is derived from the essence of the commandments themselves: the Divine commands are eternal, and they obligate the one who is commanded not only to adhere to them, but also to align and correct his deeds to be in compliance with his commandments.) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 125).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 09, 2018, 05:49:40 AM
This reckoning is not calculated only on the basis of the number of sins and merits, but also takes into account their magnitude. There are some merits that outweigh many sins, as it says, "Because something good for the L-rd, the G-d of Israel, has been found in him ..." In contrast, a sin may outweigh many merits, as it states, "One sin may obscure much good." The weighing of sins and merits is carried out according to the wisdom of the Knowing G-d. Only He knows how to measure merits against sins (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 128).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 10, 2018, 06:21:52 AM
For the choirmaster, a Psalm by David. May the L-rd answer you on the day of distress; may the Name of the G-d of Jacob fortify you. May He send your help from the Sanctuary, and support you from Zion. May He remember all your offerings, and always accept favorably your sacrifices. May He grant you your heart's desire, and fulfill your every plan. We will rejoice in your deliverance, and raise our banners in the Name of our G-d; may the L-rd fulfill all your wishes. Now I know that the L-rd has delivered His anointed one, answering him from His holy heavens with the mighty saving power of His right hand. Some (rely) upon chariots and some upon horses, but we invoke the Name of the L-rd our G-d. They bend and fall, but we rise and are invigorated. L-rd, deliver us; may the King answer us on the day we call (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 105). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Noachide on September 10, 2018, 07:29:46 AM
For the choirmaster, a Psalm by David. May the L-rd answer you on the day of distress; may the Name of the G-d of Jacob fortify you. May He send your help from the Sanctuary, and support you from Zion. May He remember all your offerings, and always accept favorably your sacrifices. May He grant you your heart's desire, and fulfill your every plan. We will rejoice in your deliverance, and raise our banners in the Name of our G-d; may the L-rd fulfill all your wishes. Now I know that the L-rd has delivered His anointed one, answering him from His holy heavens with the mighty saving power of His right hand. Some (rely) upon chariots and some upon horses, but we invoke the Name of the L-rd our G-d. They bend and fall, but we rise and are invigorated. L-rd, deliver us; may the King answer us on the day we call (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 105).
Amen, I read this Psalm every day.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 11, 2018, 03:11:49 AM
Amen, I read this Psalm every day.

This Psalm makes me weep.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 11, 2018, 06:12:22 AM
In the course of this multi-year project, many obstacles and delays occurred. In the face of each one, our faith in Divine Providence assured us that the time for this or that accomplishment had not yet arrived, and that by continuing our work without discouragement, surely it would be revealed why some later date was more propitious for the completion a particular task. As I prepared to conclude the first English edition by writing the preface, it seemed disheartening that so many Gentiles, sincerely devoted to the Noahide path, had waited impatiently for its publication. But as I noted the date, Sep. 11, 2008, it became immediately and strikingly clear. If all will take to heart these words, as they are spoken from the heart, and learn and fulfill G-d's will as it has been set forth here before the world, please G-d, there will not be another dark day of "September 11th." Instead, the bright and holy light of G-d's goodness, which is stored up for humanity, will soon be revealed with the coming of the true Messiah (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 23).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 12, 2018, 04:35:56 PM
If one built a house, or married a woman, or had a child, and then had success three times afterwards, he is permitted to consider this as a sign of his success, and it is permitted for him to set this as a good sign for the future to depend upon; i.e., that if he builds another house, or marries another woman (in a place and time that it is permitted to have more than one wife), or has another child, he will then have success, because this is not soothsaying; rather, the person sees it as an assurance of Divine assistance (a mazal).   

As it is correctly understood in classical Hebrew, a mazal is not a superstition, but a natural destiny which G-d has provided. Since this is a phenomena within the natural creation, there is a logical basis for allowing oneself to rely upon it, in the manner described (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 245).   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 13, 2018, 08:49:00 AM
Likewise, if one tests a medicinal charm three times and has success each time (such as through an amulet worn by a sick person), even though he doesn't know how it might work, but only that it is a repeatable good charm, it is permitted to use it based on this (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 245). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 14, 2018, 02:49:06 PM
Gentiles are not liable to capital punishment by a court for compelling a forced sale (although theft in general is a capital sin for Gentiles). The reason for this (as explained in footnote 1) is that even though the owner has distress over the incident, he accepts the sale and he does not lose any net monetary value (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 654). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 15, 2018, 12:20:29 PM
Although the courts do not give capital punishment for forcing a sale, the forcer will nevertheless be punished harshly by G-d for this sin. Furthermore, if the courts do not establish laws and punishments that will deter this, people will be less stringent in general, and they will think that if they also commit extortion or rob a small amount, they will avoid the authority of the court. This tendency to leniency obviously applies to robbing something that is less than a perutah in value. It also applies to stealing small amounts of money that people will normally not take the trouble to claim in court, and for which they will not normally call on law enforcement to report the robbery (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 654-655). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 16, 2018, 05:01:50 PM
The structure of the Hebrew words used by Abraham to name G-d is significant. He proclaimed to the world that G-d's name is "E-l olom," in which the word "E-l" (G-d) is attached directly to the word "olom" (universe), with no letters intervening. If Abraham had used the phrase "E-l ha'olom" (explicity stressing "G-d of the universe"), it would have left the impression that the universe is a separate entity from G-d Himself. Abraham's declaration of "E-l olom" stresses that there is in fact no true separation between G-d and the universe. Rather, the universe is nothing more than an emanation of G-d's power, which is united with G-d Himself in total unity. Therefore, when we bless G-d that He is "King of the universe," we are praising His rulership over the physical realm, while bearing in mind the lesson from Abraham that intrinsically, the universe and all its inhabitants are no more than an expression of G-d's creative power and His inner will. With this realization, a faithful person will naturally be motivated from love and awe of the immanently present Essence of G-d to dedicate his entire life to his direct source in Godliness, by serving Him and fulfilling His will (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 143).   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 18, 2018, 01:42:40 PM
One who hits a pregnant woman and kills her embryo,31 or a doctor who performs an abortion - by which process the embryo cannot possibly live,32 or a doctor who gives the mother medicine for the purpose of aborting the embryo or killing it in place, or a pregnant woman who took this action herself,33 are all liable to be punished for murder in a court of law.

31 Rashi on Tractate Sanhedrin 57b.

32 Although it may be possible to place the aborted embryo in an incubator and it would survive, if the doctor does not intend to do so and the baby is not put in an incubator, this is considered murder.

33 Since the abortion-inducing medicine will surely take effect in her body, it is tantamount to the case where one pushes a victim into a pit where he will surely die from hunger or lack of air, and as explained in topic 2 above, this is considered direct murder for a Gentile.

Although Rambam, Laws of Murderers ch. 6, differentiates between a murder caused directly from one's own power or that comes as a result of one's actions, this difference applies only for inadvertent killing and for a Jew, as opposed to an intentional murder caused by a Gentile, who is liable for indirect murder (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 384).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 20, 2018, 04:13:28 AM
This Third Edition of The Divine Code contains eight main Parts. Each Part contains numbered chapters, and each chapter contains numbered "topics." Thus, Part I, topic 6:2, refers to topic 2 of Chapter 6 within Part I. In this edition, we have placed the Editor's notes as added footnotes marked by an asterisk (*); these include commentary or additional information. Also, several errors that were found in the recent Limited Edition, in the cross-referencing of the renumbered footnotes, have been corrected (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 21).   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 21, 2018, 12:17:22 AM
To make the footnoted citations of Rabbinic sources more meaningful, a bibliography for the book has been provided on our Web site, with short historical information on the source texts and their authors.7 The sources are generally cited using our transliterations of their Hebrew titles. The exceptions are the citations of section titles in Rambam's Mishneh Torah, which are translated into English for the benefit of those who wish to look up the citations in a translation of Mishneh Torah. For this purpose, these translated titles match, or nearly match, the titles as they appear in the Mishneh Torah volumes that have been published in English by Moznaim (Brooklyn, New York; translated by Rabbi Eliyahu Touger). This series has been a valuable asset for our translation of the topics in Sheva Mitzvot HaShem, many of which follow the wording of Mishneh Torah.

7 https://asknoah.org/wp-content/uploads/the-divine-code-bibliography.pdf (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 21-22).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 22, 2018, 01:03:42 AM
In Part I, Chapters 1-4 present basic principles of Torah-based faith in the One G-d, acceptance of the truth of the Torah, acknowledgment that Divine rewards accrue from observance of G-d's will, and that the opposite (G-d forbid) accrues from deliberate, or sometimes careless, transgressions of His will. In Chapters 5-6 and 8-9, we present a practical and reliable guide to subjects that are of prime importance in daily life: Torah Study, Prayer, Moral Conduct, and Repentance. A few topics may seem outdated (e.g., Chapter 7 in Part I, and Chapter 4 in Part II, which have been significantly shortened; and Chapter 4, after topic 1, in Part V). However, this provides more material from Torah sources for Gentiles to study, and by learning how the general rules applied in those cases, one can see how to apply those rules in a situation that might be encountered today. In this new edition, a few editing updates have been made for additional clarity (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 22).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 23, 2018, 01:35:35 AM
The Noahide precept of justice, or dinim, is the obligation, incumbent upon societies, to establish the rule of law through courts in every district of the land. It is, however, not simply the establishment of law and order (however that might be) specifically in reference to the Noahide Laws, which have somewhat of a parallel in secular legal philosophy that might be called an order of "natural justice." In actuality, it is the Divine template for human conduct, set out in the Hebrew Bible and its Oral tradition. This is what Rambam intends when he states that the Noahide precept of establishing a system of justice is for the purpose of ruling on the other six universal Noahide Laws. That is to say, justice itself is one of the Seven Noahide Commandments, with its own parameters, and its purpose is to judge in relation to, and to enforce the observance of, the other six Noahide Laws (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 662).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 24, 2018, 06:58:56 AM
In defining the precept of dinim, the words of Rambam are "to judge in relation to these six (other) precepts" and this is understood to exclude judgment in certain areas where punishment is given over to the hands of Heaven1 instead of the courts.

1 Such as Rambam details in Laws of Kings, 10:6-9. See Rabbi Yehuda Gershoni, Mishpat HaMeluha on Laws of Kings 9:14. Nevertheless, even for those transgressions which are not to be judged by a Noahide court, it is incumbent to publicize and teach those laws and even apply limited punishment to offenders when they are broken, for the transgressions are serious in the eyes of G-d, and may even entail the spiritual death of the person's soul, as in the case of creating new (man-made) religions and religious commandments, for example (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 662).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 25, 2018, 01:13:34 AM
Still it would appear that the precept applies to three areas: (a) the actual prescriptions in the Noahide Laws as set out in the Biblical revelation to Moses at Sinai, and elucidated in the Oral tradition which also derives from Sinai; (b) an area of rules and arrangements in the realm of justice, mandated by reason for the purposes of social order, where the rightness of this reason is generally informed by the rationally grasped precepts given to the Jewish people, but for which the same prescription of detail does not necessarily apply to Gentiles as does for the Jewish people;2 (c) a domain of adopted stringencies, whereby higher standards of justice (judged by reference to the Jewish ideal of "absolute justice") are taken on and become part of Noahide law.3

2 As we find in the general discretion given to the Jewish king and Jewish courts to rectify social order, which are in fact founded on Noahide law.

3 As the Lubavitcher Rebbe learns in the view of Rashi, Likkutei Sihot, Vol. 5, p. 190. See also Rabbi J.D. Bleich in "Mishpat mo'ves b'dinei b'nei Noah" in the Sefer HaYovel for Rabbi Y.B. Soloveitchik, pp. 203-204, where he quotes an opinion that the punishment intended for Tamar (Genesis 38:24) was for her supposed transgression of a prohibition introduced through the court of Shem (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 662-663).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 26, 2018, 12:18:09 AM
The normative legal system is thus not a mere reflection of community values or a repository of statutes given by a legislative body, but of the Noahide Code, within which community values - including legislated laws and norms - are included so long as these are consistent with the Noahide laws. Judges, lawmakers and the enforcers of law all need to be cognizant of this higher, universal code. Where there is doubt as to the parameters of Noahide law in regard to new matters, the filling of this gap can be done only by a qualified Orthodox Rabbinic authority in the Noahide laws.4

4 See Likkutei Sihot Vol 29, p. 98, where a Noahide judge is prohibited from "filling a gap," under the general prohibition to a Noahide to m'hadesh da'at (extrapolate to a new application of Torah Law) (Laws of Kings 10:10) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 663).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 27, 2018, 02:15:17 AM
The function of the system of justice is also put "negatively": to disallow disorder. Here Rambam writes that the function of courts under Noahide law is to "warn the people" against its infringement. This therefore presupposes a stance of practical responsibility5 on the part of the State's agencies of justice: both of the constituted sovereign authority (the king or the duly instituted ruling government) and the judiciary.

5 Along the lines of the Lubavitcher Rebbe's remarks on the two-fold function of a Noahide judge: (a) to set forth the relevant rulings and (b) to see to it that they are carried out. Likkutei Sihot, Vol. 29, p. 98 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 663).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 28, 2018, 03:17:39 AM
The precept of dinim is of particular contemporary importance, even in societies with high standards of impartiality and freedom from corruption in the administration of justice. This is because personal value judgments and beliefs can and do enter the rulings of judges, resulting in decisions which are at variance with the Noahide Laws. This we have seen in rulings permitting homosexual "marriage," abortion on demand and euthanasia. The judge must first and foremost know and be beholden to the universal Noahide Laws as the background ethical conditions for all positive (human-made) law and its adjudication (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 664).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 29, 2018, 01:37:15 PM
Every judge is commanded and warned to judge righteously,43 as it says, "You shall not commit a perversion of justice; you shall not favor the poor and you shall not honor the great; with righteousness shall you judge your fellow." It also says, "Do not pervert the judgment of your poor person in his grievance." It also says, "You shall not pervert the judgment of a proselyte or orphan." The Bible repeatedly warns a number of times about the perversion of justice, especially concerning the perversion of justice for those who are weak, because the judge has to strengthen his resolve to the utmost to protect their rights before violent and strong people who try to oppress them, and the judges are likely to ignore their distress.

43 From Hasdei Dovid Tosefta end of Tractate Avodah Zarah and Minhat Hinuh Mitzvah 235, this is also obligatory on Gentiles as part of their commandment of Dinim (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 679).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on September 30, 2018, 10:34:21 AM
It is forbidden for a judge to pervert a judgment, which includes convicting the innocent or vindicating the guilty, whether in monetary cases or in cases of capital offence. Even regarding a defendant who is known to be wicked, it is forbidden to pervert the judgment by condemning him if there is insufficient evidence to prove that he violated the law in the case that has been brought to the court.49

49 See Hatam Sofer Likutim ch. 14, and Minhat Hinuh Commandments 81 and 233, that this verse also applies to Gentiles. Obviously, the judge must use his discretion when a case has reasonable doubt; it is only prohibited for him to make judgment based on a personal estimation of the righteousness of a litigant. See Sheva Mitzvot HaShem, Part VIII (Dinim), topic 5:9 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 679).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 02, 2018, 02:46:44 AM
This is stated regarding monetary cases in the verse, "Do not pervert the judgment of your poor person in his grievance." (About this, the Sages explained that "poor" means poor in observance of his commandments, meaning that because he is sinful, he has no merits in the eyes of the judge.) And regarding cases of capital offence, it is stated, "do not execute the innocent or the righteous." If "the innocent" is stated, what extra meaning is added by "the righteous"? It refers to a defendant who should be declared "righteous," i.e. not guilty, in his court trial, because even if he is known to have committed crimes in the past, there is not enough legal evidence to convict him in the present case, and certainly the judge must therefore not take this opportunity to have him put to death (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 679-680). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 03, 2018, 08:24:17 AM
It is obvious that it is forbidden for a judge to pervert justice for the sake of someone whom he wishes to gain favor from or to promote, for whatever reason. Judges are warned against all these things, which are all included in the precept of, "you shall not commit a perversion of justice," that was cited above. Someone who violates one of these prohibitions has transgressed the Noahide commandment of Dinim (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 680). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 04, 2018, 05:33:00 AM
What is included in the prohibition of "you shall not favor a poor person"? It is forbidden for a judge to have mercy on a poor person in judgment, and he should not say to himself, "This man is poor, and his opponent is rich, and it is appropriate that the rich man should support the poor man (because he needs charity). Therefore, I will award the monetary judgment to the poor man, and as a result he will be supported in dignity" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 680). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 05, 2018, 09:14:13 AM
The prohibition of "you shall not respect a great man" means that if a case comes before a judge between a rich wise man and a poor simple man, the judge should not favor the rich wise man. For example, the judge should not ask the rich man about his well-being, because with this the judge is showing favoritism, and when the poor man sees this, he will become bewildered and will stumble in his arguments or withhold them, and then the resulting judgment will not be fair (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 680). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 06, 2018, 09:10:43 AM
Similarly, the judge should not say to himself, "How can I find this honorable person guilty in judgment, and then as a result he will be embarrassed? I will declare him to be innocent, and after that I will tell him privately that he is really guilty and responsible to pay the amount." A judge should not do any such things; rather, he should promptly decide and hand down the correct legal judgment, without showing favor to either litigant for any reason (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 680-681). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 07, 2018, 02:26:58 PM
It is forbidden for a Gentile judge to take a bribe, for this directly results in a perverted judgment. Even taking a bribe to give a correct judgment is forbidden, for the Torah declares twice, once in Exodus - "You shall not accept a bribe, for a bribe will blind the clear sighted and corrupt words that are right" - and again in Deuteronomy: "You shall not pervert justice; you shall not show favoritism, and you shall not take a bribe, for bribery blinds the eyes of the wise and perverts just words" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 681). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 08, 2018, 12:55:24 PM
Bribery perverts the opinion of the judge, because from the moment he accepts a bribe, his opinion leans (away from the proper and unbiased judgment) because of the bribe that he received,59 and he does not judge fairly.60

It is also forbidden for a judge to take bribes from both litigants, even if he takes an equal sum from both of them.

59 Rashi on Deut. 16:19 - one may not take a bribe, even to give a just sentence, for once one takes a bribe it is not possible to turn against the giver.

60 As explained in footnote 27, the Noahide Law of Dinim is the overall commandment that includes all the details which for Jews are individual commands, as explained in Part VII, ch. 1, footnote 4. It is also clear from Ramban mentioned earlier that a Gentile judge may not take a bribe even where he has decided to make just sentence (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 681).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 09, 2018, 06:53:50 PM
A judge has to be very careful not to take a bribe. If a judge feels that because of some favor that one of the litigants once did for him, his opinion is leaning in that person's favor, he is obligated to invalidate himself from judging in that case, because he might not make a fair judgment (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 681-682). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 10, 2018, 09:43:53 PM
It is forbidden for a judge to accept a gift from a litigant who gives it in order that he be found innocent in judgment. This prohibition of accepting a gift from a litigant applies even after the judge has completed his deliberation and already decided what his correct legal ruling is, and has already delivered the verdict or stated the law, because this is similar to bribery. 

Just as it is forbidden for a judge to take a bribe, so too it is forbidden for a policeman to take a bribe to absolve himself from fulfilling his responsibility (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 682). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 11, 2018, 08:50:20 PM
A judge who took a bribe is invalid to judge from that point on, and his judgments are not to be regarded as the law - not in the case in which he took the bribe, and not in any case that he will judge in the future.65 However, the judgments that he made before he took the bribe are not invalidated.66

65 Shulhan Aruh Hoshen Mishpat 7:9. After a judge has taken a bribe once, he is considered to be a sinful person and is unfit to even testify in court from then on (unless he does complete repentance), and any future cases he judges are invalid. This is clear from Sefer Meirat Einayim Hoshen Mishpat 9:13.

66 See Prisha Hoshen Mishpat ch. 9, Urim Hoshen Mishpat 9:7, and Pishei Teshuva Hoshen Mishpat 9:10, regarding one who is paid by litigants to judge their cases. Unless there is proof or a very strong reason to believe that he was previously untrustworthy, the past judgments he made are still valid (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 682).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 13, 2018, 12:24:23 AM
It appears that according to the law, a Gentile judge who took a bribe is not obligated to return the bribe, for it was given to him as a gift. It is clear that the society's legal system has permission to institute that the bribe may be taken away from the judge, and this enactment would be proper. It has already been explained that they are obligated to rescind his decision that he passed, remove him from his position as judge and punish him for taking the bribe (as explained in Sheva Mitzvot HaShem, Part VIII, topic 2:9) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 682). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 14, 2018, 04:19:51 AM
Just as it is forbidden for a judge to take a bribe, it is obvious that the prohibition also applies to the one who gives it, because he is causing the judge to transgress and pervert justice,68 and indeed he transgresses the commandment of Dinim.

68 Shulhan Aruh Hoshen Mishpat ch. 9 explains that this is prohibited for a Jew under the Jewish commandment, "You shall not put a stumbling block before the blind." Although that precept is not incumbent upon Gentiles, it has been explained in Part I, ch. 4, that it is forbidden for Gentiles to do this. It is also possible that one who gives a bribe transgresses the prohibition of "You shall commit no injustice in judgment" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 682-683). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 15, 2018, 11:40:23 AM
There is no difference between a monetary bribe or any other favor or benefit; it is all considered bribery - for example, when a litigant pays any of the judge's debts, or giving a bribe through others to be given to the judge (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 683). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 16, 2018, 08:36:11 AM
The Sages taught that any judge who charges money from litigants in order to judge them, that his judgments are invalid. Even though this was said regarding the judgment of the Jewish people, nevertheless, it is obvious that every society or government of Gentiles is obligated to establish a salary for their permanent judges and officers, that will be arranged from the public funds (of the region or city), so that they should be paid handsomely and not be dependent on getting paid through the goodwill of the ones being judged. This is because a judge who takes money from litigants is acting very similarly to taking a bribe, and this will lead to perversion of justice (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 683).   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 17, 2018, 09:23:00 AM
If it is the custom in a certain place that a permanent judge takes an equal sum of money from every litigant that comes before him, then it is permitted, since all the people in that place accept that they will act in this way, and the payment is known and fixed (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 683).   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 18, 2018, 01:44:12 PM
This above law pertains to a permanent judge (established by the government, or the like), before whom the litigants are forced to be judged. Therefore, the public is obligated to arrange that his salary be fixed according to their collective opinion, so that he will judge truthfully and fairly. But if a judge is asked by litigants to judge them in a monetary case (as an occasional private manner, and not because it is required by the government's law, so it is considered a type of arbitration), or to arrange a compromise for them, then he is permitted to establish his payment in advance according to the discussion he has together with both of them, because they have willingly accepted his authority over their dispute (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 683-684).   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 19, 2018, 07:31:13 AM
In addition, this payment must be made in advance75 by both litigants (in front of each other, so that neither of them will suspect the other or the judge); otherwise, it is not a fair judgment. This is because arbitration and compromise are also considered to be types of judgment, and it is forbidden for a judge who arbitrates or arranges a compromise to take bribery or pervert the judgment against one of the sides, for this is theft and a violation of the principles of Dinim. And if a litigant tells the arbitrator or the one arranging the compromise, "if you will find me innocent, I will give you such-and-such a sum of money," then that is complete bribery.

75 See Sefer Meirat Einayim Hoshen Mishpat 9:14, that it is sufficient to establish payment before the case begins (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 684).

Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 20, 2018, 02:14:40 PM
A judge is permitted to take an additional payment for any other necessary expenses (such as upkeep of his office), but if a judge gives undue raises to his assistants and liberally increases their expenditures or the like (at the expense of the public or a private person), then this person is displaying greed, and it is disgraceful (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 684).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 21, 2018, 04:05:24 PM
Included in the precepts of "Do not pervert the judgment" and "You shall not commit a perversion of justice" is the prohibition of causing suffering by prolonging the decision of judgment.79

79 See Rambam Laws of Courts 20:6; Sefer HaHinuh Commandment 233. It appears that it is even forbidden to delay a verdict in a capital case, as explained in Rambam Laws of Courts ch. 11 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 684).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 22, 2018, 04:35:59 PM
This means holding back from judging a certain case because the court pushes aside upholding the law, especially if it is done by extending the trials of weak people such as orphans and widows. Regarding them it is stated, "You shall not oppress any widow or orphan," because their souls are downcast, and they do not have the power to demand from the judges to judge their cases promptly (or at all). Regarding judges who prolong in deciding the law for the cases of weak people, the prophet says, "The orphan they do not judge, and the quarrel of the widow does not come to them. 'Therefore,' says the Master, the L-rd of Hosts, the Mighty One of Israel, 'Oh, I will console Myself from My adversaries, and I will avenge Myself of My foes' " (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 684-685). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 23, 2018, 05:14:57 PM
Prolonging the decision of judgment is included in the prohibition of "You shall not commit a perversion of justice" because procrastinating to make a decision in judgment causes the wronged person a loss of time and money as well as great pain, and sometimes, because the judgment is pushed off (repeatedly), the plaintiff loses hope of receiving fair judgment. In this case, both oppression and perversion of justice are committed through the withholding of judgment (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 685). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 24, 2018, 04:28:31 PM
Included in the prohibition of extending and pushing off a legal judgment is that which the Sages referred to, "A judgment of a maneh (a large sum of money) should be as esteemed in your eyes as the judgment of a small coin." This means that if a case of a small coin comes before a judge and he has begun to hear the case, he should not stop and push it away (thereby delaying the judgment of the case) in favor of hearing another case involving a large sum of money that was waiting next in line. Instead, the legal proceedings and judgment of the case at hand, whether it is a small or large matter, should be judged first. This is also what Moses commanded to the judges of the Jewish people: "You shall not show favoritism in judgment, small and great alike shall you hear" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 685-686). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 26, 2018, 01:30:50 PM
Similarly, a judge is forbidden to delay his judgment of case (meaning, he draws out the judgment for an unnecessary time), by lengthening matters that are clear, in order to cause pain to one of the litigants, or to the one who is guilty. This is included in the rule of "You shall commit no injustice in judgment" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 686). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 27, 2018, 06:17:07 PM
The rule of the matter is this, anyone who pushes off the judgment is unjust, whether it is in carrying out the discussions and judgment, lengthening the judgment, or in carrying out the decision, it is causing suffering by delaying judgment and it is included in the prohibition of "You shall not commit a perversion of justice" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 686).   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Israel Chai on October 28, 2018, 04:48:15 PM
The rule of the matter is this, anyone who pushes off the judgment is unjust, whether it is in carrying out the discussions and judgment, lengthening the judgment, or in carrying out the decision, it is causing suffering by delaying judgment and it is included in the prohibition of "You shall not commit a perversion of justice" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 686).

Beis din is infinitely better than secular court for this.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 29, 2018, 09:18:33 AM
Beis din is infinitely better than secular court for this.

Indeed. Just like Torah education is infinitely better than secular education.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 29, 2018, 09:21:15 AM
It has already been explained in Chapter 1 that included in the Gentiles' obligation of the commandment of Dinim is the obligation to judge in cases of a claimant and a defendant.

Which are cases of a claimant and a defendant?

This would include every monetary case that arises by the claim for money between a man and his fellow, such as:

- cases of robbery and theft in which the robbed victim claims that the robber should return to him that which was stolen;

- cases of fraud in which the buyer sues the seller for fraud in price or similar things;

- cases of exploitation and an employee's salary in which the exploited claims payment that is due to him;

- cases of guardians in which the one who entrusted his article claims the article entrusted to the guardian;

- cases of lenders and borrowers;

- cases of business transactions such as when one side reneges on the agreement, or when the buyer claims that there is a blemish in that which he purchased, and any claims similar to these,

- similarly, cases of partners who come to divide their possessions (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 687).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on October 31, 2018, 01:50:01 AM
Any sum of money about which there is an argument between a man and his fellow, and they are not able to come to agreement between themselves about what each of them is due, the court is obligated to judge their case, for the sake of justice and peace (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 687).   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 02, 2018, 12:10:41 AM
Also, Gentiles are obligated to judge in cases of bodily harm or harm to life (and the principles of these things have already been explained in the laws of murder and theft), and damages to property or possessions (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 687). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 03, 2018, 12:42:25 PM
It has already been explained in Chapter 1 that these laws are not decided according to Torah as to what is the law for each one of them, but instead it is the responsibility of the Gentile societies and lawmakers to discuss these matters and to pass fair laws in each matter and in each detail of these laws, and to judge in each case as pertains to that situation according to the laws they establish (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 687-688). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 04, 2018, 01:51:01 AM
Included in the commandment of Dinim for Gentiles is to make compromises between the litigants,88 as it says,89 "that they keep the way of the L-rd, doing righteousness and justice," and justice means compromise.

88 Rashi and Meiri on Tractate Sanhedrin 56b. See Mesheh Hohmah on Genesis 18:19 which G-d said about Abraham, that compromise ("righteousness" in this verse) precedes judgment, and for Gentiles, even if a judge knows the decision to which the law is inclined, it is righteous to make a compromise between the litigants (and only if they are persistent in demanding a legal ruling should the judge do so).

89 Genesis 18:19 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 688).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 05, 2018, 11:05:12 AM
A compromise is a judgment of peace, as it says, "Administer truth and the judgment of peace in your gates." What is a type of judgment that has peace in it (meaning agreement and appeasement between the two sides)? This is a compromise (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 688).   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 06, 2018, 02:03:37 PM
Therefore, the correct procedure in light of Torah is that initially the judge should suggest and say to the litigants, "Do you desire a judgment or a compromise?"92 It is also a righteous practice on the part of the judge to attempt to make a compromise between the two litigants and to convince them to do this, and also after he heard their claims and he knows in which direction the judgment will lean, it is still a righteous practice to make a compromise.93

92 Rambam, Laws of Courts ch. 22; Shulhan Aruh Hoshen Mishpat ch. 12.

93 Shulhan Aruh ibid. 12:2. See Ethics of the Fathers 4:7, "Rabbi Yishmael (the son of Rabbi Yosay) said, '(A judge) who refrains from handing down legal judgments (but instead seeks compromise between the litigants) removes himself from enmity, theft, and (the responsibility for) and unnecessary oath; but one who aggrandizes himself by (eagerly) issuing legal decisions is a fool, wicked and arrogant' " (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 688).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 07, 2018, 04:29:56 PM
If they agree to make a compromise, that is preferable to making a judgment, but the litigants are not obligated to accept the compromise that the judge will make unless they made a commitment to do so.

Even though it is a righteous practice to make a compromise, if the judge recognizes that there is a real theft or exploitation committed by the defendant, it is a preferred righteous practice to save the exploited person from the hand of the one who exploited him. Therefore, the judge should make an unequivocal judgment, and he should not make a compromise that will cause loss to the exploited and an unfair gain to the exploiter. Only if he has no ability at all to pass judgment and fairness against the wicked person and remove the theft (the stolen goods or payment) from his hands, then he should make a compromise from lack of any better available choice (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 688-689). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 08, 2018, 04:15:30 PM
Just as the judge must create equality between the two litigants and listen to their words equally, so too in a compromise. The compromise that the judge suggests must be equal, and not show preference to one side more than the other, because it says, "Justice, justice you shall pursue." In the doubled language of this verse, one directive for justice refers to justice in judgment, and the other directive for justice refers to justice in compromise (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 689).   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 09, 2018, 06:38:24 PM
Even after a litigant accepted a compromise in his demands and committed himself to the decision according to the legal procedure, if he finds a proof or testimony that was hidden from him at the time that they made the compromise, and the judgment should be changed in a substantial manner because of that proof, he may go back and change what he accepted because his compromise and his monetary waiver were made in error (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 689). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 11, 2018, 08:18:00 AM
Similarly if the judge erred in the compromise with a very big error that leaned the judgment of the compromise to one side in a manner that was not appropriate, the litigant who lost out may appeal and bring it to judgment again (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 689-690). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 12, 2018, 03:16:50 PM
Two litigants are permitted to arrange for themselves one arbitrator or a number of arbitrators who will hear their case and pass judgment. It seems to me that arbitration (by Gentiles) is a subcategory of making a compromise which is part of the commandment of Dinim, and just as the judge is obligated to try to make a compromise as explained above, similarly, if the litigants agree to make a compromise between themselves either on their own or through an arbitrator whom they both accept, then this is compared to a compromise arranged by a judge; i.e., it is considered to have fulfilled the commandment of Dinim (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 690). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 13, 2018, 02:06:44 PM
That which has been explained in Sheva Mizvot HaShem, Part VIII, Chapter 5, that the regular court should force the two litigants to be judged before it, this applies when one of them or both of them do not want to be judged in any form of law (not in a court, not by a compromise, and not by arbitrators). But if they both agree to a compromise or to arbitration, then that is their prerogative and they are not forced to be judged by the law (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 690). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 14, 2018, 05:37:54 PM
Arbitration is similar to a compromise in that they both need binding acceptance, because otherwise each side could renege on it. It is proper that each side should find for himself one arbitrator to be like a judge, and if they want, a third arbitrator as a judge, then they should choose a third arbitrator by mutual agreement, or they should grant permission to the two arbitrators who were already selected to choose for themselves a third arbitrator. The two sides should then write up a document of arbitration in which each side obligates himself to accept this arbitration as binding. And after they do this, neither side is able to disagree with these arbitrators or with their conclusion, or to demand that additional arbitrators be added on to the three (with the exception of situations in which an error in the judgment is discovered, as mentioned above in topic 5) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 690-691). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 16, 2018, 12:29:15 AM
Even though the process of arbitration is like reaching a compromise, it is similar to judgment (with the agreement of the litigants), in that the arbitrators are discussing between themselves how to judge and decide between the litigants. Therefore, all the prohibitions that apply to the judge in order to prevent perversion of justice also apply to the arbitrator; for example he is not allowed to take a bribe which will distort the judgment, and the arbitrator should not listen to the words of one litigant when not in the presence of his opponent (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 691). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 17, 2018, 03:00:02 AM
Any payment to an arbitrator for his service of arbitration needs to be given by each side equally, because otherwise it would be a case of bribery and distortion in favor of one side (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 691). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 19, 2018, 12:02:48 AM
If the arbitrators do not know how to judge or decide in a specific case, and they want to ask for advice from sages or other judges regarding the matter, they are permitted to do so, and the litigants may not prevent them from doing this, since they already obligated themselves with the arbitration (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 691).   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 20, 2018, 08:59:13 PM
Though the commandment of Dinim is primarily focused on the conduct of the community, with the purpose of creating a just society, each individual is nevertheless part of this community and will necessarily impact society as a whole through his or her actions. Therefore, along with the obligations on the individual to uphold the command of Dinim as part of the general scope of the command discussed in topic 1:5 above, there are also additional obligations on the individual's conduct, as a sort of branch of the command of Dinim (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 692). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 22, 2018, 12:16:53 AM
Though all these obligations are both logical and ethical and therefore obligatory as discussed in Part I, Chapter 3, they are also considered part of the commandment of Dinim since they are the just way to act towards another person, and the purpose of the obligations is identical to that of Dinim, that of making a functional and orderly world (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 692). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 23, 2018, 09:08:19 AM
"With righteousness shall you judge your fellow" (Lev. 19:15): This verse teaches us not only about the upholding of justice in the courts, but also the ethical and moral way for an individual to conduct his or herself. The Sages learned from this verse, "Judge each person favorably," and they also taught regarding the necessity of reaching a compromise in order to preserve peace,109 and that making peace is part of judging favorably and acting kindly.

109 See Ethics of the Fathers, in: 1:12, "Hillel said: 'Be of the disciples of Aaron, loving peace and pursuing peace..." (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 692).

Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 24, 2018, 07:00:54 AM
Part of the obligation of judging favorably is the necessary effort that must be put out to persuade the other person to become more upright. This is the source of the prohibition explained in Part I, Chapter 4, that a Gentile may not lead another to stumble in sin, as it is obligatory to judge another favorably, which includes helping the other person to become more upright (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 692).   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 25, 2018, 04:14:12 PM
It is therefore befitting that any person who can assist others in teaching the foundations of belief in the One G-d and the obligations of one person to another and to G-d, must accept this great obligation. As previously explained in the Part I, topic 3:1, Moses our teacher was commanded that all people must be compelled to accept the Seven Noahide Laws, and the obligation to persuade people to accept this is not only upon Jews, but also upon Gentiles. Any persons or groups who have influence - be they kings, governments, courts, or any individuals - and who have the ability to persuade and explain to someone about the obligation to observe the Noahide Laws, is required to do so (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 693).   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 26, 2018, 04:54:24 AM
It is self-explanatory that saving a person's life from a would-be murderer is also an aspect of pursuing justice, and therefore some say110 that it is obligatory for a Gentile to save another person, based on the above branch of Dinim (in addition to the obligation explained in Part V, topic 7:3).

110 See Hemdat Yisrael (Rambam, Laws of Kings 9:9) in the name of Zehuta D'Avraham, that a Gentile is obligated to save another's life under the command of Dinim (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 693). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 27, 2018, 04:46:03 PM
If two boats are traveling towards each other and at their meeting point there is not enough space for both to pass at the same time without capsizing, one vessel must wait at a wider point until the other passes through. The same applies to two camel drivers that are passing through a narrow precipice in a mountain, where both cannot traverse at the same time or one would fall off; it is incumbent on one of the camel drivers to return backwards and let the other pass. How is it determined which one should go through first? First priority goes to the one carrying a load; if both are equal in this regard, the one who has an easier time turning to the side or back should do so. If both are still equal, then they should compromise between themselves or decide on a compensation for the one turning back (or to make a rotation of turns if this regularly happens) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 693).   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 29, 2018, 06:44:00 AM
The same applies to all situations in which a number of people want to do something but cannot do it simultaneously; it is incumbent upon them to act justly in regards to making order and setting priority, even in regards to who goes first when walking up stairs, etc. Regarding such conduct, the verse says, "Justice, justice you shall pursue," i.e. one must pursue both a just decision in court, as well as a just compromise if there is no clear priority or weight towards one of the parties (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 693-694). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on November 30, 2018, 04:02:12 PM
It has previously been explained in Part I, Chapter 3, that the obligations which are logically incumbent, such as honoring one's parents or being kind and charitable, are obligatory upon all Gentiles since they are the ways of upright conduct (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 694).   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 01, 2018, 10:46:12 PM
There are Rabbinic opinions which say that Gentiles are obligated to give charity (as an additional active commandment,113 beyond what is included in the specific Seven Noahide Laws, which only command about refraining from forbidden actions), and this obligation applies both to the community as well as the individual, to help the needy in any way possible.

113 Roke'ach ch. 366; Yad Ramah and Hidushei HaRan on Sanhedrin 57b; and the approbation of Netziv for Ahavat Hessed of the Hofetz Hayim (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 694). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 02, 2018, 06:46:26 PM
Even those Rabbinic opinions that disagree and say that charity is not an explicit universal commandment, do agree that it is an obligation as part of the necessity to create a civilized world, by protecting and helping others.114 It is not permissible, nor is there any justification, for any community to hide from its poor constituents and not make efforts to help them. A community that ignores the poor is comparable to the historic cities of Sodom and Ammorah (Gomorrah), and will eventually be destroyed as they were.

114 Likkutei Sihot vol. 5, p. 160 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 694). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 03, 2018, 08:58:13 PM
Regarding these cities, the prophet Ezekiel said; "Behold, this was the sin of Sodom ... She and her daughters (her suburbs) had pride, fullness of bread and peaceful serenity, but she did not strengthen the hand of the poor and the needy. And they were haughty, and they committed an abomination before Me, so I removed them in accordance with what I saw." The Sages said that the destruction of Sodom and Ammorah was only finally decreed on account of their not upholding the hand of the needy, and because they prevented from their midst all efforts of charity and help to the poor (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 694-695). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 05, 2018, 12:28:33 AM
Charity and kindness are the attribute of Abraham, about whom G-d said, "For I have known (loved) him, because he commands his children and his household after him, that they keep the way of the L-rd, doing charity and justice ..." From all of Abraham's qualities, G-d praised his exceptional kindness (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 695). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 06, 2018, 09:29:14 AM
An act of kindness is greater than charity, as it can be done for the rich as well as the poor, and can be done both with money as well as bodily effort (such as visiting the sick, gladdening a bride and groom, and escorting a friend). As well, charity is done only for the living, whereas one can do kindness for the dead as well (such as eulogizing, escorting the bier and burying the dead) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 695). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 07, 2018, 03:53:28 AM
Included in kind actions are visiting the sick, comforting the bereaved, paying for the expenses of the dead and arranging for a eulogy, and burying the dead with honor befitting the deceased and his or her relatives, making wedding arrangements and inviting guests.121

121 Rambam, Laws of Mourners ch. 14. See Roke'ah ch. 366, who implies that Gentiles are obligated to invite guests either because it is a logical obligation or it is part of their obligation of charity. See Rashbam on Genesis 26:8, that the obligation of inviting guests preceded the laws given at Sinai, i.e., that it is part of a commandment to Gentiles (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 695).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 09, 2018, 02:00:12 AM
What is included in making wedding arrangements? It is a great kindness to assist in finding fitting matches for men and women, and the same applies for marrying off one's children, both with assistance in good advice and monetary help (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 695).   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 10, 2018, 09:59:56 PM
Kindness and charity can be done on many levels. A person should not mistakenly view the act of giving as only a kindness to others, as the act of giving is more beneficial to the giver than the recipient (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 695). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 12, 2018, 05:12:51 AM
Anyone who has pity on the poor is pitied by G-d. Therefore, a person should meditate that he is constantly requesting from G-d to provide the necessary livelihood, health and all other good things in life, and just as one depends on G-d to listen to his prayers, so must one answer the requests (and prayers) of the poor. One who has mercy on others is given mercy from Above, but one who closes his ears from hearing the cries of the poor should not wonder why G-d is not listening to him (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 696). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 13, 2018, 12:26:05 PM
In this vein, the prophet says, "It has been told to you, O man, what is good, and what the L-rd does require of you: only to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with your G-d." "To do justly" refers to correct justice in courts; "to love mercy" refers to charity; and "to walk humbly with your G-d" refers to escorting the deceased and arranging for the expenses of weddings" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 696). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 14, 2018, 05:46:32 AM
"To walk humbly with your G-d" also teaches that there is nothing finer than modesty, and there is nothing finer in the way of charity than giving to the poor with discretion (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 696). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 15, 2018, 11:46:54 AM
There are eight levels of charity, each greater than the next:

1) The greatest level, above which there is no greater, is to support a fellow person by endowing him with a gift or loan, or entering into a partnership with him, or finding employment for him, in order to strengthen his hand until he need no longer be dependent upon others. In this way the poor person need not feel the embarrassment of having to accept alms. Therefore, such charity, where the poor is accepting the money in a respectable way, is more praiseworthy than were the poor person is embarrassed to receive alms (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 696).   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 16, 2018, 07:35:04 PM
2) A lesser level of charity than this is to give to the poor without knowing to whom one gives, and without the recipient knowing from who he received. In this circumstance as well, the poor person need not feel embarrassment at being the recipient of charity from any specific person. Giving to a charity fund is similar to this mode of charity, and is a great deed, as the giver and receiver do not know who each other are (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 696-697). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 17, 2018, 12:30:58 PM
3) A lesser level of charity than this is when one knows to whom one gives, but the recipient does not know his benefactor.

4) A lesser level of charity than this is when one does not know to whom one gives, but the poor person does know his benefactor.

5) A lesser level than this is when one gives to the poor person directly into his hand, but gives before being asked.

6) A lesser level than this is when one gives to the poor person after being asked.

7) A lesser level than this is when one gives inadequately, but gives gladly and with a smile, to encourage and pacify the recipient.

8. A lesser level than this is when one gives unwillingly and unhappily, causing the poor person embarrassment (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 697).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 18, 2018, 02:55:05 PM
If one does give, but unhappily and with anger, he loses most of the merit of his giving. One should not allow himself to feel or be openly haughty for the charity he has given, and if one does so, it is fitting that he not only lose his merit for helping the poor, but that he should even be punished (by Heaven for his haughtiness and the embarrassment he has caused to the poor) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 697).   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 19, 2018, 05:31:47 PM
It is permissible for another person to publicize a donor's work, so that others will honor the donor and learn from the donor's good actions (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 697).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 20, 2018, 04:43:34 PM
A righteous Gentile should strive to give charity for the sake of Heaven alone, and not in order to merit rewards such as a livelihood or health, and surely not for his own honor (as this may cause him to lose his merit). Nevertheless, if one does give charity and then prays to receive some reward for this, the good deed still stands; however, it is not as great as if one gives with a pure heart.129

129 See Tractates Rosh HaShanah 4 and Bava Batra 10, "one who gives a selah coin to a poor person so that his son should live, etc" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 697). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 22, 2018, 06:36:59 AM
Helping one who is not needy is not considered charity. Such a person who takes from charitable funds is a thief and a swindler, as he swindles those who think they are giving true charity when this is not the case, and he is stealing the portions of those who are truly needy who now have less available to them (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 698).   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 24, 2018, 12:03:58 AM
Likewise, one should not give charity to one who collects unless it is clear that the collector is honest and is collecting for a just cause, as it is possible that the collector is a swindler and is using the community's money in an unnecessary and wrongful way (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 698). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Noachide on December 24, 2018, 07:01:57 AM
Likewise, one should not give charity to one who collects unless it is clear that the collector is honest and is collecting for a just cause, as it is possible that the collector is a swindler and is using the community's money in an unnecessary and wrongful way (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 698).
It is good to know this. Various people knock on my door.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 25, 2018, 01:47:02 AM
It is good to know this. Various people knock on my door.

I have a simple rule: nobody comes in unbidden. 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 25, 2018, 06:10:11 PM
This can be seen in the saying of the Sages, "We investigate a request for clothes but not for food," meaning that when a poor person whose identity is unknown says: "I am hungry, provide me with food," we do not investigate whether he is a deceiver (unless he is known to be a deceiver, in which case we do not give him anything). Instead, we provide him with sustenance immediately. However, if he asks for clothes or something less essential, we investigate whether he is a deceiver, and only if it is clear that he is truly in need do we give to him (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 698).   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 27, 2018, 12:31:37 AM
The greatest charity is redeeming captives, and this holds the highest priority before any other type of charity. One who neglects to help the plight of captives or is lazy in redeeming them (when he is able to do so) is considered as having blood (i.e., murder) on his hands.131

131 Rambam, Laws of Gifts to the Poor ch. 8; Shulhan Aruh Yoreh De'ah ch. 252 (Note that there are situations in which ransom is not given, so as not to encourage kidnappers, if the ransom is intended as a type of blackmail upon the society to extract money - see Shulhan Aruh Yoreh De'ah 252:4.) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 698).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 28, 2018, 04:27:13 PM
In all forms of charity, it is proper to prioritize the needy that are closer than those who are farther. One's immediate family members come before the extended family, one's neighbors before the indigent of the rest of the city, and the indigent of one's city before those of the whole country (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 698).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 29, 2018, 06:12:19 AM
If a Gentile who observes the Seven Laws desires to give charity through the Jews, it should be accepted from him. This charity money should be given to the Jewish poor, for a righteous Gentile who is in need may likewise receive sustenance from the Jews, and they are commanded to support him if necessary. In contrast, if an idolater desires to give charity through the Jews, it should be accepted from him and given to the Gentile poor.133

133 Rambam, Laws of Kings ch. 10. Though it says there that the closer the needy person is, the more precedent he has, this does not apply to a collector who is able to distribute as he sees fit, as explained in Shulhan Aruh Yoreh De'ah 251:9 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 699).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on December 31, 2018, 12:01:12 AM
If a Gentile gives charity through a Gentile charity collector, it is the collector's choice as to which poor people he will distribute the money to, or to which cause he will remit the charity.134

134 However, charity money should not be given to, or collected for, any causes that are in violation of any precepts within the Noahide Code (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 699).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 01, 2019, 10:02:35 AM
If a Gentile gave charity to a synagogue, it may be accepted, provided the Gentile says, "I am donating it according to the intent of the Jewish people" (i.e., that the Gentile donor is not going to be involved in deciding how those funds will be disbursed; generally such a gift is accepted, and should be dispersed in the appropriate manner based on the type of Gentile donor as detailed above in topic 16, and in topic 13 regarding gifts of food for the needy.) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 699).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 02, 2019, 12:23:32 PM
Charity to the poor is greater than a donation to a synagogue in that it atones for one's sins, whereas a donation to a synagogue is considered only as a "burnt offering" to G-d (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 699).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Noachide on January 03, 2019, 07:27:46 AM
Charity to the poor is greater than a donation to a synagogue in that it atones for one's sins, whereas a donation to a synagogue is considered only as a "burnt offering" to G-d (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 699).
This is good to know. Never used to think in this way.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 03, 2019, 01:33:18 PM
This is good to know. Never used to think in this way.

If I sin, needy people usually ask me for help on the very next day or even the same day.

The Divine Code also says that the merit of those who support Torah outreach is immeasurably great.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 03, 2019, 02:16:09 PM
This does not apply to donations that fund any project for construction, repair or upkeep within the walls of Jerusalem, and surely not to the Temple Mount or the Temple itself, as such funding must only come from Jews, as written in Ezra, "It is not for you (Gentiles) together with us (Jews) to build a Temple for our G-d; rather we, by ourselves, will build (it) ...," and in Nehemia, "... but you (the Gentiles) have no portion nor charity nor remembrance in Jerusalem" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 699-700).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 04, 2019, 07:22:23 AM
The deed of inviting guests is a law enacted by Abraham for his descendants and those who follow in his ways, and is the way of kindness which he exemplified. He would feed the passersby and give them beverages to drink, and would escort them on their way. The reward for escorting is greater than all other ways of attending to a guest (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 700).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 05, 2019, 10:11:17 AM
Indeed, inviting guests is greater than receiving the Divine Presence, as it says, "And he lifted up his eyes and saw, and behold! Three men were standing before him. He saw, and he ran to meet them from the entrance of the tent, and bowed toward the ground. And he said: 'My Lord, if it please you that I find favor in Your eyes, please pass not from before your servant.' " This tells us that Abraham was sitting in prayer before G-d, yet when he saw the guests, he asked permission from G-d to interrupt his prayer, and G-d's revelation to him, in order to take care of his guests and invite them in. Therefore, it can be seen that inviting in guests is greater than receiving the Divine Countenance (in prayer) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 700).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 06, 2019, 09:58:40 AM
Escorting a guest at the conclusion of one's hospitality is greater than inviting a guest into the house, and indeed the Sages say that one who does not escort a guest as he leaves is as if he has spilled his blood. How far must one escort a guest? One should walk the guest through the door and at least 4 cubits beyond the door, and if the guest is a respectable person, the host must escort the guest according to the guest's honor or need (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 700).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 07, 2019, 10:20:33 AM
With thanks to the One Above, the Directors of Ask Noah International express their deepest gratitude to:

Rabbi Moshe Weiner, who has stood on the shoulders of giants to thoroughly elucidate the essence and foundation of the Torah-based Noahide faith, and to produce the world's first codification of the Noahide Commandments, in his volumes of the series Sefer Sheva Mitzvot HaShem (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 3).

 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Noachide on January 08, 2019, 03:56:40 AM
With thanks to the One Above, the Directors of Ask Noah International express their deepest gratitude to:

Rabbi Moshe Weiner, who has stood on the shoulders of giants to thoroughly elucidate the essence and foundation of the Torah-based Noahide faith, and to produce the world's first codification of the Noahide Commandments, in his volumes of the series Sefer Sheva Mitzvot HaShem (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 3).

 
Amen, this man has done more for us than many people around us.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 08, 2019, 04:03:48 AM
Amen, this man has done more for us than many people around us.

From Moshe ben Maimon to Moshe Weiner there arose none like Moshe!
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 08, 2019, 01:02:37 PM
Rabbi Eliyahu Touger, who believed in the vision of this project, helped establish its practical framework, and provided very helpful advice;

Rabbi Yosef Schulman, who contributed the great amount of basic translation work;

Rabbi and Mrs. Berel Goldberg, for their expert assistance;

the Schulman, Reisner and Weiner families, who patiently, and lovingly, endured the unwavering commitment of the Directors of Ask Noah International to provide the Noahide movement with this English text, as a foundation for faith and practical observance which is true to the chain of the righteous Torah Sages extending back to Moses our teacher, who transmitted the Noahide Code from Mount Sinai (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 3).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 09, 2019, 01:14:04 PM
Rabbi Jacob Immanuel Schochet, o.b.m. who provided invaluable guidance, friendship, approbation and support to the Directors of Ask Noah International, along with expert contributions of explanations and daily prayers for Pious Gentiles, and to whom this book is dedicated (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 3).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 10, 2019, 09:40:32 AM
(Abraham) planted an eshel in Beer-Sheba, and there he proclaimed the Name of G-d, G-d of the Universe. (Genesis 21:33)

"(Abraham) planted an eshel in Beer-Sheba" - (What is this eshel? The Sage) Reish Lakish said: this teaches that he made an orchard and planted in it many types of fine fruit trees (to benefit the wayfarers). (The Sage) Rabbi Nehemiah said: he built an inn (for the wayfarers, for lodging, food and drink) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 4).

Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 12, 2019, 02:05:12 PM
"and there he proclaimed the Name of G-d, G-d of the Universe" - Reish Lakish said: Do not read it as "he proclaimed;" rather, read it as "he caused to call." This teaches that our forefather Abraham caused the Name of the Holy One, blessed be He, to be called by the mouth of every passerby (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 4). 
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 13, 2019, 05:54:55 PM
How? After (the wayfarers) ate and drank, they stood up to bless Abraham. He would say to them, "Was it then of my food that you ate? You ate from the food of the G-d of the universe. (Rather, you should) thank, praise and bless He Who spoke and caused the universe to come into being" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 4).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 15, 2019, 12:31:53 AM
They would ask, "What shall we say?" He told them, "Blessed is the G-d of the universe, from Whose bounty we have eaten." So Abraham taught all people to recognize and call in the Name of G-d, G-d of the universe (Tractate Sotah 10b and Rashi; Midrash Rabbah Genesis ch. 54) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 4).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 16, 2019, 05:39:07 AM
Approbation (free translation)

Kislev 13, 5767 / November 23, 2007

Behold, I am compelled to speak in praise of the great living scholar, the Rabbi HaGa'on Rabbi Moshe Weiner (may he live for many long and good days), and in praise of his book, a "Shulhan Aruh L'Bnei Noah," which is an elucidation of the Torah Laws of the Seven Commandments for the Children of Noah. He truly showed greatness in his clear explanations and Torah-law rulings in matters that were not discussed at length or elucidated in breadth in the works of the Rabbinical authorities. Therefore I give my appreciation to the above Rabbi who put out such a book into the world. And for the love of the holy words, I have added comments in a few places. Let us pray to G-d that "the earth will be as filled with knowledge of G-d as water covering the sea bed (Isaiah 11:9)," and "all will form a single band to carry out the will of G-d, blessed be He."* Amen.

Rabbi Zalman Nehemiah Goldberg

Supreme Rabbinical Court of Israel

*From the Rosh Hashanah liturgy (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 5).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 17, 2019, 08:29:15 PM
Approbation (free translation)

Shlomo Moshe Amar

Chief Rabbi of Israel and President of the Great Rabbinical Court

With the Help of Heaven

Tammuz 6, 5768 / July 9, 2008

Letter of Blessing

I saw the good book, well-written and aptly titled "Sheva Mitzvot HaShem," compiled and authored by the Rabbi and great scholar, Rabbi Moshe Weiner, may he live for many long and good days.

I have also seen the immense work that was required to explain all the matters of the Seven Commandments for the Children of Noah, and this was done very well, written in simple, clear language, so that the reader can easily comprehend it.

I bless him that G-d should send him success in all his endeavors, to continue in his holy work, and to author and publish more works in excellent physical health.

And may it be G-d's will that he see blessing in the work of his hands, that it be for the sake of G-d, blessed be He.

Waiting for G-d's salvation and mercy,

Shlomo Moshe Amar

Chief Rabbi of Israel (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 7).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 19, 2019, 02:21:17 AM
Approbation (free translation)

Monday, Tevet 22, 5768 / December 31, 2007

To the Respected Rav, the Ga'on Rabbi Moshe Weiner,

I was honored to peruse and learn his compilation titled "Sheva Mitzvot HaShem." I was deeply impressed by the copious citations in the book, which display a great erudition in the Talmud and its commentaries. The detailed development of issues in the material reflects on the author's tremendous effort to solve them. May G-d strengthen him in his Torah studies and in continuing his holy work.

With great respect,

Gedaliah Dov Schwartz

Head of the Rabbinical Courts,

Rabbinical Council of America

and Chicago Rabbinical Council (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 8.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 20, 2019, 05:55:27 PM
LETTER FROM RABBI J. IMMANUEL SCHOCHET

Rabbi of Congregation Beth Joseph

Toronto, Canada

Cheshvan, 5768 / October 2007

The world has undergone a fascinating revolution. For approximately three decades there has been an ever-growing interest in the Sheva Mitzvot B'nei Noah, the "Seven Commandments for the Children of Noah," revealed in the Torah of Moses.1 A great number of Gentiles throughout the world have committed themselves to observe this universal "Noahide Code." Many of them are in touch with reliable Rabbis to learn about their religious obligations as "Righteous Gentiles." Unfortunately, there was very little authoritative material to guide even these Rabbis.

1 Maimonides, Hilhot Melahim (Laws of Kings) 8:10. See also Hilhot Milah 1:6, and the glosses of Kesef Mishneh and Tzafnat Pane'ah, ad loc (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 9).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 22, 2019, 02:22:37 AM
Throughout most of post-Biblical history, the Noahide commandments could not be widely promoted, for the obvious reasons of the restraints of the Jewish exile, especially under the duress of the threats from non-Jewish religions who dominated the governments throughout the Diaspora (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 9).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 23, 2019, 08:33:14 AM
These circumstances made it difficult even to apply the comment of Rabbi Yomtov Lipman Heller that if we are ordained to promote observance of the Noahide Code, how much more so then to use friendly persuasion to lead the hearts of all to the Will of their Creator. With few exceptions, this has led to "neglect" of this important aspect of Torah (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 9).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 24, 2019, 02:22:53 PM
Clearly, these restraints no longer apply, and this has been conducive to the development of the so-called Noahide movement. The search for clear information and guidance, however, is hampered by the lack of precise summaries of a Code for the Noahides. Thus, it is a tremendous merit for the organization Ask Noah International, directed by truly pious and responsible Jews, to be inspired to fill this vacuum (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 9).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 26, 2019, 12:06:04 AM
In November, 2005, Ask Noah International brought together a team of highly qualified Torah-scholars to dedicate themselves to this goal. Rabbi Moshe Weiner of Jerusalem undertook to bring it to fruition. He devoted himself for two years to a thorough in-depth study of the Seven Noahide Commandments and succeeded in composing a historic text in Hebrew, Sefer Sheva Mitzvot HaShem, Volume I, in the style and format of the classic Shulhan Aruh (Code of Jewish Law), to serve as a guide for the practical application and observance of their detailed laws by Noahide individuals, families and communities. The significance of this project cannot be over-emphasized, as ever more Gentiles seek to follow a lifestyle conforming to the Divine commands incumbent upon them (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 10).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 27, 2019, 06:47:09 AM
Needless to say, this is an extremely sensitive undertaking charged with great responsibilities. Thus, Rabbi Weiner's work, Sefer Sheva Mitzvot HaShem, was submitted for review by the world-renowned Rabbinical authority HaGa'on Rabbi Zalman Nehemiah Goldberg (may he live for many long and good days), member of the Supreme Rabbinical Court of Israel, who graciously examined the text, adding numerous comments throughout, and granted his approbation (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 10).   
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 28, 2019, 11:49:05 AM
All the scholars consulted have praised this work as a major achievement, which brings an important but neglected area of Torah to the forefront of Rabbinic attention. They emphasize, though, that it is yet more important to make all people aware of it, in concise and easily readable format, as an authoritative guide for their daily lives. The translators and editor of the English version of the Sefer Sheva Mitzvot HaShem are thus bringing the project to its first milestone, which is now serving as the basis for translation into other languages (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 10).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on January 30, 2019, 06:24:25 AM
Immeasurably great is the merit of all those who are involved with, and supporting, this extra-ordinary endeavor, which no doubt will hasten the fulfillment of the prophetic vision of "the earth will be as filled with knowledge of G-d as water covering the sea bed" (Isaiah 11:9).

J. Immanuel Schochet

Toronto, Canada (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 10).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on February 01, 2019, 12:06:28 AM
THE DIVINE CODE

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Letters of Blessing and Approbation for Sheva Mitzvot HaShem

Editor's Preface by Dr. Michael Schulman

Author's Introduction

Part I: Fundamentals of the Faith

Introduction by Rabbi Dr. J. Immanuel Schochet

1. Awareness of G-d; The Torah of Moses; Deniers and Deviators from the Foundations of Faith

2. Proselytizers and False Prophets

3. The Prohibition Against Making a New Religion or Adding a Commandment

4. Liability to Divine and Earthly Punishments

5. Torah Study for Gentiles

6. Serving G-d; Prayer and Grace After Meals

7. Sacrificial Offerings

8. Obligatory Moral Conduct

9. Repentance (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 11).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on February 02, 2019, 03:06:59 PM
Part II: The Prohibition of Idolatry

Introduction by Rabbi Dr. J. Immanuel Schochet

1. The Prohibition of Idol Worship

2. The Prohibition of Turning to Idol Worship

3. Which Actions Make One Liable for Idol Worship

4. The Service of Moleh

5. Forbidden Statues, Images and Pillars

6. The Prohibition of Creating a New Religion

7. The Obligation to Eliminate Idol Worship, and the Prohibition of Benefiting from It

8. Aspects of Idolatry from which Benefit is Allowed, and Nullification of Idols (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 11).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on February 03, 2019, 06:32:39 PM
9. Objects Offered to Idols, and Decorations of Idols

10. The Prohibition Against Aiding Idol Worshipers

11. Practices that are Forbidden as Customs of Idol Worshipers

12. The Prohibition of Swearing or Vowing in the Name of an Idol (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 12).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on February 05, 2019, 02:42:04 PM
Part III: The Prohibition of Blasphemy

Including the Laws of Vows

Introduction by Rabbi Dr. J. Immanuel Schochet

1. The Obligation to Respect G-d's Name, and What is Forbidden as Blasphemy

2. Obligations to Revere and Fear G-d

3. Laws of Vows and Promises

4. Annulment of Vows and Promises, and Vows Made According to the Public's Understanding (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 12).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on February 06, 2019, 04:15:40 PM
Part IV: The Prohibition of Eating Meat that was Separated from a Living Animal

Including Restrictions on Causing Suffering to Living Creatures, Mating Different Species of Animals, and Grafting Different Species of Fruit Trees

Introduction by Dr. Joe M. Regenstein

1. Permissions and Prohibitions for Gentiles Regarding Meat; Species for which Meat from a Living Animal is Forbidden

2. Which Parts from Living Animals are Prohibited to be Eaten

3. The Prohibition of Separating Meat from an Animal that is Living or in the Process of Dying, and Restrictions on Consuming such Meat after the Animal's Death

4. Maimed or Broken Limbs

5. The Precepts Pertaining to a Fetus, and to Eggs

6. Deriving Benefit from Flesh Separated from Living Animals; Cases with a Doubt, and Mixtures with Forbidden Meat (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 12).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on February 08, 2019, 02:39:46 AM
7. Restrictions on Causing Suffering to a Living Creature

8. The Prohibition of Mating Different Species of Animals

9. The Prohibition of Grafting Different Species of Fruit Trees

Part V: The Prohibition of Murder and Injury

Introduction by Dr. Michael Schulman

1. Details of the Prohibition of Murder; Abortion; Euthanasia; Causing Mortal Injury, and Partners in Murder

2. Suicide, and Sacrificing One's Life for One of the Seven Noahide Commandments

3. Laws of a Pursuer and Self Defense

4. An Accidental Killer's Obligation for Exile, Laws of a Blood-Redeemer, and Cities of Refuge

5. Intentional and Unintentional Killing, and Killing Through Negligence or Under Duress

6. The Prohibition of Causing Personal Injury or Damage

7. The Prohibition of Endangering Oneself or Another, and the Obligation to Save a Person's Life

8. The Prohibitions of Embarrassing Another Person, Evil Gossip, and Tale-bearing

9. Reproductive Sterilization, Contraception, Emitting Semen "in Vain," and the Severity of the Sin of Murder (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 13).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on February 10, 2019, 12:31:48 AM
Part VI: The Prohibition of Forbidden Relations

Including Precepts Relating to Marriage, Divorce, Marital Relations, and Being Alone with a Forbidden Partner

Introduction by Arthur A. Goldberg

1. Categories of Sexual Partners and Acts that are Forbidden

2. The Prohibitions of Homosexual and Bestial Relations

3. The Prohibition of Relations with Other Men's Wives; Marital Status of Minors; Precepts Related to Adultery by a Gentile with a Jewess; Marriage of an Enslaved Woman; Partners with Whom there can be no Status of Marriage (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 13).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on February 12, 2019, 12:18:16 AM
4. Precepts Related to Marriage, Fornication and Divorce

5. Precepts Related to Spilling Semen, and Contraception

6. Guarding Against Forbidden Relations, and Following Ways of Modesty

7. Prohibitions Related to Being Alone with a Forbidden Partner (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 14).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on February 13, 2019, 02:30:07 AM
Part VII: The Prohibition of Theft

Introduction by Rabbi Moshe Weiner

1. The Prohibition of Theft

2. Laws of Returning Stolen Objects, and Restitution for Theft

3. The Prohibitions of Aiding or Having Benefit from Theft or Buying Stolen Property, and the Laws of Unintentional Theft

4. Laws of Saving Oneself or One's Property at the Expense of Another's Money; Taking the Law into One's Own Hands

5. Theft Incurred by False Measurements, and the Prohibition of Cheating or Misinforming Another Person

6. The Prohibition of Extortion, and Forcing a Purchase

7. Laws of Borrowing, Renting, Responsibility for an Entrusted Item, and Holding Collateral for a Loan

8. Stealing or Encroaching Upon Real Estate Property

9. The Prohibition of Kidnapping; Stealing Enslaved Persons

10. The Prohibition of Rape, and Laws of Taking Captives

11. Bodily Injury and Damaging Another's Property

12. The Laws of a Delinquent Debtor and One Who Withholds Payment Owed to a Hired Person

13. The Laws of a Worker in Regard to the Employer

14. Government Authority; Laws of Land Conquered in War

15. Laws of Ownerless Items and Finding Lost Objects

16. Maintaining Peace in Society by Forbidding Acts Similar to Theft (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 14).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on February 15, 2019, 02:10:52 AM
Part VIII: Establishment of Laws and Courts

Introduction by Rabbi Dr. Shimon D. Cowen

1. The Obligation for a Gentile Society to Set Up a Judicial System

2. The Prohibition Against Perverting the Course of Justice or Taking a Bribe

3. Monetary Laws, and Laws of Mediation and Arbitration

4. Societal Morality and the Obligation of Doing Kindness (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 15).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on February 16, 2019, 07:38:32 AM
Additional chapters on Torah Laws for societally empowered Noahide Courts, in Sheva Mitzvot HaShem, vol. 3, Part VIII:

Appointment of Judges and Enforcement Officers, and the Qualifications Necessary to be a Judge

The Law of a Judge Who Purposefully or Mistakenly Judges Incorrectly

The Jurisdiction of a Noahide Court, and How to Appeal the Decision of a Noahide Court

Summons to a Monetary Adjudication, and Representation by a Lawyer

The Order of the Court Case

Necessary Qualifications of Witnesses

Giving Testimony, and Producing Documentation

The Laws of a False Witness

Laws of Inheritance

Punishment of a Murderer

Punishment for Infractions of the Other Noahide Laws

Government Law

Military Justice

Appendix: Laws of the Ger Toshav (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 15).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on February 17, 2019, 10:45:10 AM
THE DIVINE CODE

EDITOR'S PREFACE

1. The Noahide Code - a destination of convergent histories

2. Some background behind this effort

3. How the practical details of the Noahide Code are determined

4. How to use this book

5. How the past can be uplifted by disseminating this message (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 16).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on February 18, 2019, 01:55:34 PM
The Noahide Code - a destination of convergent histories

1. Praise the L-rd, all you nations; extol Him, all you peoples.

2. For His kindness was mighty over us, and the truth of the L-rd is everlasting; praise the L-rd. (Psalm 117)

This shortest Psalm consists of only two verses, which together encompass all humanity. Verse 1 encompasses all non-Jews, and verse 2 encompasses all Jews. These are the two intersecting vectors of the image of G-d within creation, and they are forever joined at a single point of unity, which is the simultaneously transcendent and indwelling Unity of G-d. This point of unity is not easily seen or felt, and that has been the case throughout most of the tumultuous history of the world. However, at one place, at one time, this point of unity was revealed, openly and miraculously, by our Creator Himself. He chose this in His wisdom, so that all of His children, the human race, could know and believe, remember and take it to heart, until the arrival of the Messianic Era. When that time arrives, it will happen because we will be ready - on G-d's terms - to receive Him as the King over the entire world. Such a fundamental revelation need only occur once, if it is unquestionably witnessed and recorded, and commanded by G-d to be preserved for posterity. That revelation took place at Mount Sinai, in the Hebrew year 2448 (1312 B.C.E.1).

1 B.C.E. is Before the Common Era; C.E. is the Common Era (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 16).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on February 19, 2019, 03:51:02 PM
At that time, the voice of G-d, the Name of G-d, and the Unity of G-d, were openly revealed. But G-d, in His wisdom, saw it better to withhold from the individuals of the witnessing nation, the Jewish people, an ability to continue living with the intensity of the revelation. Instead, He appointed Moses (Moshe in Hebrew) as His prophet, to receive and transmit all of His commandments for the future generations (Deut. 21-28) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 16-17).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on February 20, 2019, 03:36:18 PM
This included the recording of G-d's encapsulation of His Divine wisdom into written words, which can be absorbed and integrated within the limited human mind. This document, the Five Books of Moses, G-d called the Torah, which means "instruction," and He bequeathed it, along with its explanations, to the Jews as an eternal inheritance (Deut. 33:4). Along with this gift came the entrusting of a great responsibility, because the Torah does not "only" specify the 613 Jewish Commandments (of which the "Ten Commandments" are only a fraction). It also contains the Seven Noahide Commandments for all non-Jews, which G-d commanded to Noah sixteen generations earlier (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 17).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on February 22, 2019, 12:44:04 AM
With the ascent of the Jews to nationhood in the Land of Israel, the surrounding nations, and especially the people from those nations who chose to take up residence in the Holy Land, returned to an awareness of the Seven Noahide Commandments. As the Jews encountered national successes and failures during the 440 years preceding, and the 410 years following, the construction of the First Holy Temple by King Solomon, the appeal of the Noahide Code among the surrounding nations waxed and waned (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 17).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on February 23, 2019, 11:16:40 AM
During the time of the Second Holy Temple (350 B.C.E.- 70 C.E.), a large movement of "Heaven Fearers" was active in the Roman Empire. These were Gentile adherents to the One G-d of Israel, who directed their religious loyalty to the Jewish Sages and the Holy Temple. It is nearly impossible to find any unbiased sources on this subject outside of the Talmud and Midrash, because after the Temple's destruction, these Torah-observant Gentiles became prime targets of the enforcers of the pagan Roman religion, and later of the missionizing activities of innovative new religions that began to challenge the Divinely appointed authority of the Torah tradition. The best non-Torah historical accounts of the "Heaven Fearers" are in the writings of Josephus.2

2 Josephus: The Jewish War 2:454,463 and 7:45; Jewish Antiquities 14:110 and 20:41; Against Apion 1:166,167 and 2:282 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 17).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on February 25, 2019, 12:11:35 AM
After the destruction of the Second Temple, and the Diaspora of the Jewish people among nations that were influenced by religions unfriendly to Judaism, it was necessary for the light and the eternal promise of the Noahide Code to be preserved and guarded by the Jewish Sages within the writings of the Oral Torah tradition (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 17-18).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on February 26, 2019, 02:29:03 PM
Their Torah-law rulings and scholarly debates on the Divine obligations of the Gentile world would have been deemed purely academic over the centuries, were it not for the scriptural prophecies of universal peace and return to Torah observance that will occur in the Messianic Era (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 18).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on February 28, 2019, 02:11:33 AM
Aside from Rabbi Elijah Benamozegh (1823-1900) in France, who used the title "Noahide" for observers of the seven commandments, there were no contemporary writings on the Noahide Code directed to the Gentile world. Although the seventh Rebbe of Lubavitch, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson (1902-1994), began delivering talks about detailed points of the Noahide Code from the beginning of his leadership in 1951, it was unexpected when, beginning in the 1980's, he put forth an urgent calling to the nations of the world to fulfill their seven commandments, and to the Jewish people at all levels to inform and influence Gentiles concerning the importance of this observance.3

3 See To Perfect the World: The Lubavitcher Rebbe's Call to Teach the Noahide Code to All Mankind, pub. Sichos in English, 2016 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 18).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Noachide on February 28, 2019, 06:59:21 AM
it was unexpected when, beginning in the 1980's, he put forth an urgent calling to the nations of the world to fulfill their seven commandments
I find this part of the sentence to be really mysterious.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 01, 2019, 01:10:09 AM
I find this part of the sentence to be really mysterious.

I think I cited it correctly. Many people believed the Rebbe was the Messiah. Perhaps he thought that calling to the nations of the world to fulfill their seven commandments was part of his Messianic duty.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 01, 2019, 01:22:39 AM
2. Some background behind this effort

In response to the Rebbe's call, many Gentiles around the world began to seek information about how to correctly fulfill the precepts of these seven commandments. Also in response to this calling, Mr. Chaim Reisner of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, founded the Ask Noah organization in the mid-1990's (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 18).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Noachide on March 01, 2019, 02:21:53 AM
I think I cited it correctly. Many people believed the Rebbe was the Messiah. Perhaps he thought that calling to the nations of the world to fulfill their seven commandments was part of his Messianic duty.
That could be a good explanation. However Jewish world is still very divided about who will be the Messiah. Each Hasidic sect think that their Rebbe is the Messiah. In the end HaShem will decide.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 02, 2019, 04:17:26 AM
In 1999, I joined Ask Noah to provide Torah-true Noahide outreach, starting as the web master of the web site asknoah.org. Since then, these efforts have reached tens of thousands of Gentiles, and growing numbers of Noahide communities. We soon saw that to fulfill the call for the nations of the world to return to the Noahide commandments, it would be necessary to have organized learning at the local level. We also learned of the Rebbe's efforts for a project to codify the Noahide commandments, in the spirit of the classic Shulhan Aruh (Code of Jewish Law) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 18).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 04, 2019, 01:49:15 AM
To undertake this ambitious task, Mr. Reisner traveled to Israel in the summer of 2004, and met with several leading Rabbis and Torah experts, to present them with our plan, and to request their advice. He received positive reactions from each one, as exemplified by this letter from Prof. Nahum Rakover, former Deputy Attorney General of Israel (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 18).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 05, 2019, 01:53:27 PM
The Jewish Legal Heritage Society

B"H

8.31.2004

Mr. Chaim Reisner

Founder, Ask Noah

Pittsburgh, PA


Dear Mr. Reisner,

I was very impressed to hear about the projects that you are planning in regard to the Seven Noahide Commandments.

It is very important to produce a "Torah Code of Noahide Law", written by qualified Torah scholars, so Noahides will know their true obligations in detail.

Your other project, to open Torah academies for Noahides to learn about their Mitzvot, sounds very interesting and innovative. The students of these academies will be well acquainted with their obligations, and can become qualified teachers to disseminate the Noahide laws among the nations.

Sincerely,

Prof. Nahum Rakover (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 19).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 07, 2019, 01:20:47 AM
With Rabbi Moshe Weiner's acceptance in 2005 to produce the foundation for this effort, an in-depth codification of the Noahide precepts, the goal became a reality. Volumes I and II of his Sefer Sheva Mitzvot HaShem (The Book of Seven Divine Commandments), were compiled in Hebrew during the next two years, with many points of scholarly advice from the renowned Torah authority, Rabbi Zalman Nehemiah Goldberg of Jerusalem (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 19-20).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 08, 2019, 02:37:19 PM
Vol. I was published in 2008, Vol. II was published in 2009, and Vol. III in 2012. These are the source texts for this translation. (The next planned edition this English series will include additional chapters on issues related to the commandment to establish laws and courts.) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 20).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 09, 2019, 02:43:15 PM
3. How the practical details of the Noahide Code are determined

Gentiles are obligated to fulfill the Seven Noahide Commandments because they are the eternal command of G-d, transmitted through Moses our teacher in the Torah. Since the explanation of every commandment in the Written Torah is established according to the Oral Torah,4 as it was given over through Moses our teacher and transmitted from generation to generation through the Jewish Sages, it can thus be concluded that the rules which guide Torah-law decisions in regard to the 613 Jewish Commandments are the same rules which guide Torah-law decisions for Gentiles, aside from a few exceptions that are explained in this work.

4 See the Introduction by Rabbi J. Immanuel Schochet to Part I of this work (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 20).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 11, 2019, 02:19:07 PM
Rambam (Rabbi Moshe ben Maimon, or Maimonides, 1135-1204) was the first to codify these commandments, albeit in very concise form, and his rulings are known to be based on the same rules that guide the Oral Torah for the Jewish commandments, unless he stated a specific exception. This reasoning is born out by the numerous discussions in the Talmud that deal with the Noahide commandments (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 20).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 12, 2019, 04:30:50 PM
In determining the Torah Law for Gentiles more comprehensively, Rabbi Weiner used the rulings in Rambam's Mishneh Torah as the main foundation, since Rambam is the principle Torah-law authority in this area. The importance of Rambam as a primary authority in the precepts of the Jewish people is well known. In the words of Rabbi Yosef Karo (1488-1575), author of the Shulhan Aruh (the Code of Jewish Law): "For he (Rambam) is the most famous Torah-law authority in the world."5 Thus, on any issue for which Rambam differed from only one other Torah-law authority, the opinion that Rabbi Yosef Karo decided upon for his Shulhan Aruh was Rambam's.

5 Quoted from Rabbi Yosef Karo's Introduction to his book Beit Yosef (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 20).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 13, 2019, 07:16:44 PM
This holds even more so for the precepts of the Noahide commandments, for Rambam is nearly the only Rishon6 who took responsibility for authoritative teachings in this area. The other well-known classic Rabbinical works, such as Tur and Shulhan Aruh, did not provide explicit rulings on Torah Law for Gentiles. Instead, we must gather insight from different points that they wrote regarding observance of Torah precepts for Jews, and these in turn imply their opinions about observance of Torah precepts for Gentiles.

6 Rishon refers to leading Rabbis during 1000-1500, who succeeded the later Talmudic Sages (200-500) and Ga'onic Sages (589-1038) in the transmission of the Torah tradition. (See Miraculous Journey, by Rabbi Yosef Eisen.) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 21).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 15, 2019, 08:06:18 PM
Therefore, Rambam is the main Torah-law authority whose opinion is to be considered in these matters, and therefore his opinion is given more weight than any other single authority. Still, exceptions can be found, and in Sheva Mitzvot HaShem, Rabbi Weiner extensively researched and cited the broad spectrum of Rabbinical sources. In the few cases where a majority of the other Rishon authorities and the Shulhan Aruh all differ from Rambam, Rabbi Weiner decided the Torah Law according to their teachings, and not according to the opinion of Rambam (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 21).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 17, 2019, 11:44:58 AM
In every case, Rabbi Weiner clearly explained the spectrum of sources, and the basis of his conclusions, in his footnotes for the text of Sheva Mitzvot HaShem. There are fewer footnotes in this English edition, and they are abridged, to limit the amount of technical Rabbinical discussion that is not relevant for most readers (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 21).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 19, 2019, 02:59:51 PM
Some topics apply to both Jews and Gentiles, but this book only comes to teach the Noahide Code. Thus, Jews should not use this text to determine their own obligations, which are more restrictive and numerous. Questions on Torah observance by any individual may be directed to observant Jewish Torah scholars, or sent to AskNoah.org (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 22).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 21, 2019, 02:51:33 AM
5. How the past can be uplifted by disseminating this message

Finally, we need to address a point that arises in the minds of many Gentiles who accept and follow the truth of the Noahide Code. This is a question about Divine fairness: what can be said about Gentiles who never had access to awareness and information about the wellsprings of the Noahide Code, which is now finally being disseminated throughout the world? Surely many good people, who did many good deeds, passed on without having had the opportunity to know of, or much less observe, the Seven Noahide Commandments. Did they not deserve the opportunity to receive a portion in the future World to Come through faithful observance of the Noahide Code? (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 22-23)
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 22, 2019, 10:39:45 PM
It is fundamentally important to recognize that G-d is fair and just, and therefore no deserving soul is denied the opportunity to earn a place in the World to Come.8 G-d's ways, including how He accomplishes this, are ultimately inscrutable and beyond the understanding of mortals. However, on such a fundamental question, there must be answers that we can relate to on a practical basis. The growth of the world population has accelerated greatly over the past few hundred years, from 791 million in 1750, to 3 billion in 1959, to 7.6 billion in 2018. Thus, the world's population at this time, when the Noahide Code is finally being presented openly for all mankind, is surely more than able to contain the reincarnated souls9 of all good and deserving Gentiles who have lived in the past. This may be G-d's way to give a soul an extra opportunity it deserves, to make amends and to become righteous. Therefore, it is a great service to every soul in the world today if we, together, will make this opportunity known and available. With G-d's help, through your help, we will accomplish this task, and very soon, with the coming of the Messiah, "the occupation of the whole world will be solely to know G-d,"10 and "the earth will be as filled with knowledge of G-d as water covering the sea bed."11

8 For a text that teaches numerous fundamental spiritual topics within Torah as they relate to Gentiles, see Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge, by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, pub. Ask Noah International, 2017.

9 See Soul Searching, by Yaakov Astor, pub. Targum Press, 2003.

10 Rambam, Laws of Kings 12:5.

11 Isaiah 11:9 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 23).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Noachide on March 23, 2019, 03:14:20 AM
It is fundamentally important to recognize that G-d is fair and just, and therefore no deserving soul is denied the opportunity to earn a place in the World to Come.8 G-d's ways, including how He accomplishes this, are ultimately inscrutable and beyond the understanding of mortals. However, on such a fundamental question, there must be answers that we can relate to on a practical basis. The growth of the world population has accelerated greatly over the past few hundred years, from 791 million in 1750, to 3 billion in 1959, to 7.6 billion in 2018. Thus, the world's population at this time, when the Noahide Code is finally being presented openly for all mankind, is surely more than able to contain the reincarnated souls9 of all good and deserving Gentiles who have lived in the past. This may be G-d's way to give a soul an extra opportunity it deserves, to make amends and to become righteous. Therefore, it is a great service to every soul in the world today if we, together, will make this opportunity known and available. With G-d's help, through your help, we will accomplish this task, and very soon, with the coming of the Messiah, "the occupation of the whole world will be solely to know G-d,"10 and "the earth will be as filled with knowledge of G-d as water covering the sea bed."11

8 For a text that teaches numerous fundamental spiritual topics within Torah as they relate to Gentiles, see Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge, by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, pub. Ask Noah International, 2017.

9 See Soul Searching, by Yaakov Astor, pub. Targum Press, 2003.

10 Rambam, Laws of Kings 12:5.

11 Isaiah 11:9 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 23).
Amen, I always enjoy reading this part about reincarnated souls.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 23, 2019, 03:43:16 AM
Amen, I always enjoy reading this part about reincarnated souls.

I hope that my dead ancestors will be reincarnated and become righteous Gentiles.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Noachide on March 23, 2019, 04:03:51 AM
I hope that my dead ancestors will be reincarnated and become righteous Gentiles.
Let's hope that our ancestors are or will be reincarnated and that they will find out beauties of the Torah.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 23, 2019, 04:19:45 AM
Let's hope that our ancestors are or will be reincarnated and that they will find out beauties of the Torah.

Amen!
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 24, 2019, 04:26:29 AM
The Master of the universe commanded Adam, the first man,1 on the day of his creation,2 as it says,3 "And the L-rd G-d commanded 'the man' (Adam) ..."

1 Tractate Sanhedrin 56b.

2 It is explained in Tractate Sanhedrin 56b that all of the Noahide Commandments can be exegetically derived from Genesis 2:16, "And the L-rd G-d commanded the man, saying, ...," which was stated to Adam in the Garden of Eden on the day of his creation; see Tractate Sanhedrin 38b.

3 Genesis 2:16 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 24).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 25, 2019, 03:31:17 PM
G-d commanded six precepts to Adam:

1) the prohibition against worshiping false gods;

2) the prohibition against cursing G-d's Name;

3) the prohibition against murder;

4) the prohibition against specific forbidden sexual relations;

5) the prohibition against theft;

6) the commandment to establish laws and courts of justice.4

The Creator added to these when He commanded Noah not to eat flesh that was removed from a living animal, as it says,5 "And G-d blessed Noah, ... But flesh, with its soul in its blood you should not eat." These seven precepts are called the Seven Commandments for the B'nei Noah ("Children of Noah," i.e. Gentiles, who are non-Jews).6

4 This includes an obligation for leaders to inform their communities about the Noahide precepts.

5 Genesis 9:1 and 9:4. (This applies to land mammals and birds, as will be explained in Part IV, Chapter 1.)

6 Rambam, Laws of Kings 9:1 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 24).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 27, 2019, 04:32:51 AM
When Moses our teacher was called up on Mount Sinai, he received the Torah's commandments directly from the Holy One, blessed be He, together with their explanations. Moses received the entire Torah from G-d - both the Written Torah (the Five Books of Moses) and the Oral Torah. The Oral Torah is the explanation of all the commandments, which are very concisely recorded in those Five Books.7

7 Rambam, Introduction to the Mishneh Torah (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 24).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 28, 2019, 11:27:01 AM
Included in the Torah, G-d also repeated and gave to Moses the Seven Commandments for the Children of Noah, along with their explanations and their details.

All the Gentiles of the world were henceforth eternally commanded to accept upon themselves and to fulfill these seven Divine precepts, because the Holy One, blessed be He, commanded them in the Torah, and He made known through Moses our teacher that the descendants of Noah had previously been commanded to do them.8

8 Rambam, Laws of Kings 8:11 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 25).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 29, 2019, 04:18:42 PM
These seven commandments have general rules and many details, and all of them are described in the Oral Torah, just as the 613 commandments (mitzvot in Hebrew; singular mitzvah) that the Jewish people were commanded to observe. The Jewish Sages and the faithful Rabbinical authorities in every generation are commanded to explain the Torah to the rest of the Jewish people. They are also commanded to explain the Noahide commandments to the Gentiles, and to teach them how these seven mitzvot should be fulfilled.9

9 Tosafot, Tractate Hagigah 13a, states that it is an obligation for the Jews to teach and inform the Gentiles of the Seven Noahide Commandments. (Due to the extreme difficulties of the extended Jewish exile, this was not possible in most societies until our recent generations.) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 25).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on March 31, 2019, 04:26:30 AM
We are not to rely on anyone else to provide explanations of any part of Torah, whether for Jews or Gentiles, aside from accepted Jewish Torah scholars, for they alone, as students of the earlier Torah Sages, are the authorities who explain the Oral Torah.10 (Rambam describes the Torah Sages of the Talmud as "the mainstay of the Oral Torah.")11

10 These are the Jewish Sages and faithful Orthodox Rabbis, whose responsa and teachings may be cited by laypersons.

11 Rambam, Laws of Rebellious Ones 1:1. There were no drawn-out differences of opinion until the Supreme Sanhedrin ceased after the destruction of the Second Temple. Until then, a difference arose only about a matter (or a required degree of strictness) that was not received from Moses. When this arose, the Sages debated and established the Torah Law according to the majority in the Supreme Sanhedrin, and it was accepted by the Jewish people (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 25).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on April 01, 2019, 06:51:35 AM
In addition to observing the Seven Noahide Commandments with their many details, a Gentile is commanded to act in the proper ways that human intelligence would compel him, whether these are obligations to G-d or to other people, or to society as a whole (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 25).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on April 02, 2019, 05:49:56 PM
Even though Gentiles are not commanded in detail about these parameters of proper conduct, nevertheless, G-d carefully checks and judges all the ways of every person. There are actions for which the individual or the society is liable to be punished, since such behavior is not appropriate for the human race, even though it is beyond the scope of the Seven Commandments.12

12 The true specialty of mankind is expressed in Tractate Avot 3:14: "He (Rabbi Akiva) used to say: Beloved is man, for he was created in the image (of G-d); it is even a greater love that it was made known to him that he was created in the image (of G-d), as it is stated (Genesis 9:6): For in the image of G-d He made man" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 25-26).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on April 04, 2019, 08:34:12 AM
Societal morality is included in the commandment of "judgments" (dinim), by which the Children of Noah were commanded to set up courts of law, and judges who will supervise and warn society about prohibited behaviors. But G-d will look upon the ways of an individual and judge him for his every action, even if he is not under the jurisdiction of a court of law, or if the court is not able to judge him, or if the court does not know about his behavior (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 26).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on April 05, 2019, 06:18:04 PM
Tractate Sanhedrin 104b relates the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah. Even though idol worship and forbidden sexual relations were rampant there, in outright rebellion against G-d, His decree of their total destruction came because they punished any performer of charity and kindness with tortuous execution. Hence it is obvious that G-d demands moral conduct from mankind, even though it is not explicitly commanded. Ramban on Gen. 6:2 explains why the Generation of the Flood was punished specifically because of theft, even though they violated all their commandments, because theft is a logical prohibition that no one can negate by saying, "we did not know we were commanded" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 26).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on April 07, 2019, 12:05:36 PM
The purpose of this book is to explain these seven commandments according to Torah principles and Torah Law, including both their general rules and their details, and also the moral obligations that are intellectually incumbent. All of this is in order to teach faithful Gentiles the way of G-d and the path in which it is proper for them to go, until they will merit through this the distinctions and the spiritual beauty of "the pious of the nations of the world."14

14 These are Gentiles who earn eternal spiritual reward by accepting upon themselves to fulfill the Seven Noahide Commandments and being careful in their observance, specifically because the Holy One, blessed be He, commanded them in the Torah, and informed us through Moses our teacher that Noah's descendants had been previously commanded to fulfill them (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 26).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on April 08, 2019, 09:38:07 PM
The Basis for Fulfillment of the Noahide Code

Rambam explains in Laws of Kings 8:11: "...The Holy One, blessed be He, commanded them (the Seven Noahide Commandments) in the Torah, and informed us through Moses our teacher that Noah's descendants had been previously commanded to fulfill them."

This means that even though Noah's descendants were previously commanded to fulfill them - and this Divine command was not nullified in legal terms, and Gentiles are still obligated by the power of the original commands - nevertheless, there were more details added by G-d through Moses at the giving of the Torah at Mount Sinai (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 27).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on April 10, 2019, 05:14:50 PM
Clearly, the Noahide Commandments were commanded to Moses, because even though they were commanded previously to Adam and Noah, they were never written down as Torah before Mount Sinai. Their recording in the Written Torah was through Moses, and their explanations and details as transmitted in the Oral Torah were given to Moses, as will be explained (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 27).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on April 12, 2019, 03:28:11 AM
According to his above-cited ruling, Rambam explains that (a) the descendants of Noah are obligated to observe their Seven Commandments because these were commanded to them by G-d through Moses, and (b) when the Torah was given by G-d through Moses, there was a spiritual dimension that He added for the Gentiles as well as for the Jews. The explanation of this spiritual dimension of the Noahide Code, which was added by G-d through Moses at Mount Sinai, is given by Rambam in Laws of the Foundations of the Torah, Chapter 8 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 27).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on April 14, 2019, 01:21:48 AM
Rambam explains that we do not believe in Moses as a prophet because of the miracles he performed, since a prediction and a sign could be accomplished through sorcery, and thus it could be doubted. Rather, we believe in Moses and G-d's true Torah - against which there will never be a real challenge - based on the true testimony of what the entire Israelite nation saw and heard at G-d's giving of the Ten Commandments at Mount Sinai. They all witnessed with absolute surety that Moses heard his prophecies directly as the open speech of G-d, and that G-d gave Moses the Torah from Heaven. Therefore, if a subsequent "prophet" arises to challenge, change or nullify any prophecy of Moses, or any part of the Torah of Moses, we can know without any doubt that this person's words are false, as is well explained by Rambam (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 27).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on April 15, 2019, 01:07:24 PM
Therefore, the obligation to keep the Torah's commandments (the mitzvot) is absolutely true, without doubt. This is not known as a private tradition as were the earlier prophecies up to the time of Mount Sinai. Before the giving of the Torah, it was possible to think that perhaps another prophet could come and contest or deny the prophecy and words of an earlier prophet. Therefore, also in regard to the Seven Noahide Commandments, their existence is not absolute because they were commanded to Adam and Noah personally from G-d. For it is possible that a later prophet could come and deny any of those commandments, and perform wonders and miracles to show his abilities, and thereby convince others that those earlier commandments had become nullified or changed. Rather, the absolutely true existence of the Noahide commandments, like the rest of the Torah, is only that they were commanded eternally by G-d Himself at Mount Sinai through Moses, as a true testimony (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 27-28).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on April 17, 2019, 03:31:06 AM
There are 248 obligations and 365 prohibitions commanded for the Jews, and seven categories of prohibitions commanded for the rest of mankind. Beyond these seven categories of prohibitions, there are also fundamental and universal positive obligations, including: belief, faith and trust in G-d; turning to Him for one's needs; and creating a civilized world (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 28).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on April 18, 2019, 05:25:57 AM
Even though the testimony from Mount Sinai was directed to the entire Jewish people who heard and saw it directly, and the Gentile nations did not experience it directly, nevertheless, such a unique testimony to a group of millions of people is impossible to refute, and there never was again any occurrence of public Divine speech to an entire nation. All of the previous and later prophets received private prophecies (see Rambam's Guide to the Perplexed, Part II, ch. 35) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 28).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on April 19, 2019, 06:38:17 PM
According to this, we can understand the words of Rambam in Laws of Kings 8:11, that "wise ones" of the Gentiles may be found who are keeping aspects of the Noahide mitzvot according to their intellect and their knowledge, or even because of the command to Adam and Noah, but not because these commandments were reiterated and renewed by G-d at Mount Sinai (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 28).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on April 21, 2019, 04:38:53 AM
As Rambam writes in Laws of Kings 9:1, logic and wisdom dictate these precepts; i.e., it is possible to observe them on an intellectual basis without belief in the Divine command, or not because they were commanded to Moses, but rather because they were previously commanded. A Gentile who does so is called "wise," but he is not called "pious" (a "hassid" in Hebrew) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 28).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on April 23, 2019, 04:34:36 AM
Rambam teaches that if a Gentile observes these only from an intellectual standpoint, but not because of G-d's command to Moses, he will receive reward for his good deeds; but he has not earned a part in the ultimate spiritual reward of the future eternal World to Come, because that is obtained only by virtue of submitting one's actions to the will of G-d that He revealed in His eternal Torah of Moses, the "Tree of Life" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 28-29).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on April 24, 2019, 09:43:00 AM
For observing the Seven Noahide Commandments based only on intellect, a Gentile's reward may be received during his lifetime in this world, or perhaps in his afterlife in the spiritual realm after the end of his physical life, or perhaps both. The eternal World to Come will begin with the general resurrection of the righteous who attached themselves to the Torah of Moses, which is called G-d's "Tree of Life" (Proverbs 3:11-18) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 29).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on April 26, 2019, 09:02:08 AM
However, the Divine command of the Noahide Code to Adam and Noah stands and has not been nullified on a Torah-law basis, for, as Rambam states in Laws of Kings 8:11, Moses informed us in the Torah that the descendants of Noah were previously commanded in them. Moses was commanded that mankind must be informed about this.17

17 This was a direct command from G-d, in the same sense as (Leviticus 6:1-2): G-d spoke to Moses, saying, "Command Aaron and his sons, saying: This is the law ..." Thus, no group can validly claim that they may by-pass acceptance of the Noahide Code from the Torah because their religion predates Mount Sinai (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 29).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on April 27, 2019, 04:50:23 PM
Therefore, Rambam says clearly in Laws of Kings 9:1, "Six precepts were commanded to Adam ... it was added for Noah ...," and these commands still stand. Therefore it is obvious that the primary commanding of the seven Noahide mitzvot was to Adam and Noah. Beyond this, G-d added three new dimensions through Moses:

(a) The Torah's details of the Noahide commandments that were not revealed before Mount Sinai, as we will now explain.

(b) Their new strength as absolute and eternal commandments, which did not exist before Mount Sinai, as explained above.

(c) After Mount Sinai, it is impossible to add, subtract or change any of the Noahide Commandments forever, as will be explained below (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 29).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on April 29, 2019, 10:38:53 AM
It is obvious that Moses explained the Torah's seven mitzvot for the Gentiles, and that the details they previously did not know were commanded to them by G-d with their explanations through Moses, at Mount Sinai. For example, after the Torah was given, a transgression of a specific Noahide commandment (a "capital sin") carries liability to capital punishment by G-d or by an authorized court. But this is not commanded in Genesis as the definitive punishment for individuals other than for murder, in Genesis 9:6 - "Whoever sheds the blood of man ..., his blood shall be shed ...," which was commanded to Noah (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 29-30).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on April 30, 2019, 07:12:30 PM
Another example is the command regarding adulterous relations with a married Jewish woman. This was related in the Torah (Leviticus 18:6) as "ish ish ..." (any man), which Tractate Sanhedrin 57b explains as including Gentiles in the command prohibiting adultery with a married Jewess. This obligated Gentiles to take care in regard to the many Torah regulations and precepts that determine if a Jewess is considered married, and they have liability before an authorized court for these additional stringencies, even though Gentiles were originally commanded through Adam regarding adultery only as it applies to Gentile marriage. Hence, the cited command in Leviticus is to Gentiles (as a detail of their forbidden sexual relations), as well as to Jews (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 30).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 02, 2019, 04:44:38 AM
These examples prove that the Torah that was given through Moses included the Seven Noahide Commandments, and added details of a Noahide Code that had not been commanded up to that point (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 30).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 03, 2019, 06:35:32 PM
More so, it was also added through Moses for all mankind that the Noahide Commandments will not change forever, and there will be no additions or subtractions. Until Moses, it was possible that G-d would let a prophet know that one of the commandments was nullified, or that a new commandment could be added (as G-d commanded the additional prohibition to Noah of eating flesh that was severed from a living animal, and He commanded the additional precept of circumcision to Abraham) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 30).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 04, 2019, 06:39:54 PM
Rambam teaches in Laws of Kings 9:1, "Thus, there are seven precepts (which were commanded to Noah). These remained the same throughout the world until Abraham, who arose and was commanded regarding circumcision, and he also ordained morning prayers. Isaac separated tithes and added a prayer service in the afternoon. Jacob added (a prohibition against eating) the sciatic nerve, and he also ordained evening prayers... Ultimately, Moses came and the Torah was completed by him." Thus, there were additions in the commands of G-d to His early prophets - first to Noah and then to the three Patriarchs. The Patriarchs also added precepts from their own logic and for their own family, yet they violated no prohibition in doing so. This possibility did not continue after Moses completed the Torah, since also for the Children of Noah, a prophet cannot add anything to the Torah, or create a new commandment or a new religion after Mount Sinai (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 30).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 06, 2019, 02:54:33 AM
But once Moses arose as the greatest prophet for all time, and G-d commanded the precepts of the Torah through him, including the Noahide commandments, no true prophet will ever arise to change, or add to, or subtract from them, forever (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 30-31).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 07, 2019, 06:52:54 AM
This concept is because of the special status of the "Torah of Moses," as Rambam describes and explains in Laws of Foundations of the Torah, Chapter 9. G-d sealed the Divine Commandments when He commanded mankind with the giving of the Torah to Moses, and He established that He will never send or command a prophet to alter any one of the Torah's commandments. This point, which G-d also commanded to Moses at Mount Sinai (Deuteronomy 13:1), established the Torah of the Jews as the source for His sealed commandments. This is true also in regard to the Seven Noahide Commandments, but only because of the unique transmittal of His commands to mankind through Moses at the public national revelation at Mount Sinai, as explained above. Without G-d's sealing of the Seven Noahide Commandments in the Torah, they would not truly be His eternal word, because of the possibility that they might be changed or added to (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 31).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 09, 2019, 03:01:28 AM
This is the depth of Rambam's words (Laws of Kings 8:11): "Any Gentile who accepts the seven commandments and is careful to observe them is of the 'pious of the nations of the world' and will have a portion in the World to Come. This is so provided that one accepts them and observes them because the Holy One, blessed be He, commanded them in the Torah and informed us through Moses our teacher that the descendants of Noah were originally commanded about them" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 31).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 10, 2019, 03:42:40 PM
The true cleaving of a person to G-d can only be in a way that accords with the will of G-d, Who has given mankind a path of connection to Himself, and to a spiritually higher level of eternal existence that is inconceivable by natural means. This can only be achieved because G-d Himself, in His unlimited kindness, bestows this possibility to mankind. If one rationalizes the observance of these seven precepts and observes them based only on that reasoning, he may indeed be an intelligent person, and he may do many good deeds. But if one's observance is based only on human intellect, which is limited, it is definitely not connected with the eternally existing Divine Truth (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 31).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 12, 2019, 03:16:01 PM
Therefore, such an approach lacks the essential element of binding to G-d's will,19 and, as the world has seen from tragic experiences, the person who follows that approach will be at increased risk of rationalizing an actual transgression.

19 In the Torah, there are statements by G-d to Moses, prohibiting Jews to do specific things that are prohibited in a general way for Gentiles. We cite such verses as sources or explanations for details of the Noahide commandments, but these are not intended to imply that Gentiles are commanded about any prohibition that G-d commanded to the Jews. Thus, particular prohibitions or directives, derived from an explanation on a Torah verse, can be understood as relating to Gentiles as G-d's will in general. This is the intention in this book - to cite verses from the Hebrew Bible as sources for Torah concepts and to provide their authentic explanations. This is a general point throughout the book, but there are exceptions when a verse actually relates directly to a commandment for Gentiles. Usually in these cases, the author explains in the main text that this is an explicit scriptural commandment for Gentiles (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 31-32).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 13, 2019, 06:39:50 PM
Without proper explanation, a person may not automatically appreciate the special blessings that G-d has made available to mankind, nor how those blessings may be secured in the manner that Rambam shared: "provided that one accepts them and observes them because the Holy One, blessed be He, commanded them in the Torah and informed us through Moses our teacher ..." This is an eternal truth that G-d, in His infinite kindness, gifted to mankind at the event of Matan Torah (the "Gift of Torah") (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 32).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 15, 2019, 06:43:13 AM
PART I:

FUNDAMENTALS OF THE FAITH

Introduction by Rabbi J. Immanuel Schochet

1. Awareness of G-d; The Torah of Moses; Deniers and Deviators from the Foundations of Faith

2. Proselytizers and False Prophets

3. The Prohibition Against Making a New Religion or Adding a Commandment

4. Liability to Divine and Earthly Punishments

5. Torah Study for Gentiles

6. Serving G-d; Prayer and Grace After Meals

7. Sacrificial Offerings

8. Obligatory Moral Conduct

9. Repentance (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 33).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 17, 2019, 04:31:14 PM
INTRODUCTION

The Foundation of the Noahide Code:

The "Written Torah" and the "Oral Torah"

by Rabbi J. Immanuel Schochet


Any Gentile who accepts the seven commandments and is careful to observe them is of the "pious of the nations of the world" and will have a portion in the World to Come. This is so provided that one accepts them and observes them because the Holy One, blessed be He, commanded them in the Torah and informed us through Moses our teacher that the descendants of Noah were originally commanded about them. But if one observes them only by virtue of common sense, he is not a Ger Toshav (Gentile "Resident," the Written Torah's term for one who takes on the Noahide Code), or one of the "pious of the nations of the world," but rather, one of their wise people.1

1 Rambam (Maimonides), Laws of Kings 8:11. This ruling is based on the very early Rabbinic text Mishnat Rabbi Eliezer, section VI (ed. New York 1933, p. 121), as noted by Rambam himself in one of his responsa (Teshuvot HaRambam, ed. Blau, vol. I, no. 148): "The pious of the nations of the world are deemed pious if they observe the seven commandments enjoined upon the descendants of Noah, in all their details" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 34).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 19, 2019, 10:35:23 AM
The first five books of the Hebrew Bible (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy) - are the very essence and substance of the "Written Torah."2

2 The term "the Written Torah" in a general sense refers to the whole body of the twenty-four Books of the Hebrew Bible. Its essence, however, is the Humash (Pentateuch, or Five Books of Moses), for it alone contains all of the Divine precepts, and nothing may be added and nothing may be subtracted from it. Even genuine prophets cannot alter anything in the Humash. Indeed, all later prophets or prophecies are verified by their complete conformity to the Humash. It is the ultimate criterion: the falsehood of a prophet or prophecy is established by even the slightest divergence from the original words of the Humash. Cf. Rambam, Principles of the Faith, no. 9; idem, Laws of the Foundations of the Torah, ch. 9 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 34).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 21, 2019, 01:05:44 PM
They are also referred to as the "Teaching of Moses,"3 and in the vernacular as the "Five Books of Moses," as the Jewish people have an unbroken historical tradition to the very time of Moses that he is their author. Moses wrote these five books by Divine dictation: every word in them was dictated to Moses by G-d Himself.4

3 For example, Joshua 8:31-32 and 23:6; II Kings 14:6; Nehemiah 8:1

4 See Tractate Sanhedrin 99a. Rambam, Principles of the Faith, no. 8; idem, Laws of Repentance 3:8 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 34-35).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 22, 2019, 10:03:55 PM
The belief in Moses as the ultimate and supreme prophet of G-d,5 and therefore of the Divine origin of the Torah, is not based on claims by Moses or others, nor on the fact that Moses performed manifest miracles, supernatural signs and wonders. The authenticity of Moses is based on the public revelation at Sinai: G-d revealed Himself to the entire nation of Israel, at least three million people, and proclaimed before them the Ten Commandments.6

5 See Rambam, Principles of the Faith, no. 7; idem, Laws of the Foundations of the Torah 7:7.

6 See Exodus 19:11, 20:1ff. and 19; Deuteronomy 4:12-13 and 35-36, and ibid. 5:2ff. and 19-21 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 35).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 23, 2019, 10:31:15 PM
The entire Jewish people personally experienced that revelation, each individual in effect becoming a prophet, and each one verifying the experience of the other. With their own eyes they saw, and with their own ears they heard, as the Divine voice spoke to them, and also they heard G-d saying, "Moses, Moses, go tell them the following ..."7 They did not receive the occurrence of that event and accept it as some claim or tradition of an individual, but they experienced it themselves. That public revelation, therefore, authenticated the bona fide status of Moses as a prophet of G-d, and the Divine origin of the instructions he recorded in the Torah. That, and that alone, is the criterion for the belief in, and acceptance of, Moses and his teachings, as G-d said to him, "I will come unto you in a thick cloud that the people may hear when I speak with you and will also believe in you forever" (Exodus 19:9).8

7 See Rambam, Laws of the Foundations of the Torah 8:1.

8 Ibid., ch. 8. See also Rabbi Sa'adia Gaon, Emunot VeDe'ot, Introduction: ch. 6 (and see there also treatise III: ch. 6); Rabbi Judah Halevi, Kuzary I:87; Sefer HaHinuh, Introduction (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 35).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 25, 2019, 03:23:54 AM
The "Written Torah" of the Five Books of Moses, however, which contains all the Divine precepts, presents a "problem," so to speak. Practically all of the precepts, the commandments and prohibitions, appear non-understandable. Their practical applications are neither defined nor explained in the text (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 35-36).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 27, 2019, 03:23:23 AM
Consider, for example, these Jewish commandments: There is a commandment of "circumcision," but one will not find an explanation in the Written Torah of what "circumcision" means - the where, what and how. Likewise there is a prohibition of "working" on the Sabbath, but there is no definition as to what constitutes forbidden tasks. There are commandments of fringes on four-cornered garments, and phylacteries placed on hand and head, but there is no explanation of how these are to be produced or how they are to be worn. There is also a mandate of ritual slaughter that renders kosher species of animals permissible for Jewish consumption, but there are no instructions for how this is to be performed. In fact, Deuteronomy 12:21 states, "slaughter ... as I have commanded you," yet nowhere in the Written Torah do we find the details of that command (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 36).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 29, 2019, 01:44:11 AM
Moreover, the current division of the Pentateuch into chapters is a very late (medieval and non-Jewish) innovation. Indeed, this chapter-division is often blatantly inconsistent with the actual text. The fact that these divisions have become accepted universally is no more than a practical convenience for purposes of reference. The original text, to this day in all Torah-scrolls, is divided only into two kinds of sections or paragraphs, but without any written punctuation to separate the 5,845 verses from one another. Also, the Hebrew text consists of consonants only; there are no written vowels. Words without vowels are clearly ambiguous; they could be read in many different ways with altogether differing meanings (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 36).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on May 31, 2019, 06:49:17 AM
In this context see Kuzary III:28-38 for Rabbi Judah Halevi's refutations of the Karaites, a sect which (like the Sadducees before them) claims to recognize the "Written Torah" only. He points out the inconsistencies and self-contradictions of their position, the unavoidable dependency on tradition. With regard to the traditional division of the Torah into sections, this is not related to facilitating easier readings. There are but 669 sections or paragraphs for the 5,845 verses, and they are of varying lengths. For example, the 148 verses from Gen. 28:10 to Gen. 32:3 form one single uninterrupted paragraph, and so do the 146 verses from Gen. 41:1 to Gen. 44:17! On the other hand, the 72 verses from Ex. 21:1 to 23:5 are divided into 18 paragraphs, and the 110 verses from Deut. 21:10 to 25:10 are divided into 44 paragraphs. Also, the 19 verses from Ex. 15:1-19, and the 43 verses from Deut. 32:1-43, have each verse broken up into separated components (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 36).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 02, 2019, 06:01:47 AM
It follows that even with acceptance of the Mosaic origin of the Torah, the written Hebrew text before us is altogether incomprehensible. On the other hand, as the Torah has always been the primary text for knowing and practicing G-d's teachings and commandments, from the very days of its composition, it is clear that the Jewish people must have been informed from the outset as to how to read it, the meanings of its statements, and the definitions of its precepts. How so? By an oral tradition.10

10 See Kuzary III:64-74 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 37).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 03, 2019, 01:12:03 PM
This tradition was revealed to Moses11 and transmitted by him to the nation, and thereafter passed on from generation to generation.12 It is called the "Oral Torah," and it was specifically not recorded in formal written texts until much later, in the Talmudic and Midrashic writings.

11 See Jerusalem Talmud, Tractate Pe'ah 2:4; Midrash Vayikra Rabbah 22:1.

12 See Rambam, Introductions to his Commentary on the Mishnah and his Mishneh Torah (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 37).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 05, 2019, 11:43:31 AM
A number of texts discuss the reasons for the Divine injunction to keep this as an oral tradition; see, e.g., Midrash Tanhuma Ki Tissa 34; Midrash Shemot Rabbah 47:1; Rambam, Guide for the Perplexed I: beginning of ch. 71; Rabbi Joseph Albo, Sefer Ha'Ikarim III:23; Rabbi Judah Lowe, Tiferet Yisrael, ch. 68-69. The historical change of eventually committing the Oral Torah to writing (the Talmud) was necessitated by the drastic deterioration of social conditions after the destruction of the Second Temple and the dispersion of Israel. (See Tractate Temurah 14b.) It became difficult for the Torah scholars to concentrate and rely on memory and transmission alone, and there was a serious threat that the tradition would be distorted and forgotten (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 37).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Noachide on June 06, 2019, 05:33:45 AM
A number of texts discuss the reasons for the Divine injunction to keep this as an oral tradition; see, e.g., Midrash Tanhuma Ki Tissa 34; Midrash Shemot Rabbah 47:1; Rambam, Guide for the Perplexed I: beginning of ch. 71; Rabbi Joseph Albo, Sefer Ha'Ikarim III:23; Rabbi Judah Lowe, Tiferet Yisrael, ch. 68-69. The historical change of eventually committing the Oral Torah to writing (the Talmud) was necessitated by the drastic deterioration of social conditions after the destruction of the Second Temple and the dispersion of Israel. (See Tractate Temurah 14b.) It became difficult for the Torah scholars to concentrate and rely on memory and transmission alone, and there was a serious threat that the tradition would be distorted and forgotten (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 37).
What a memory did they have when they memorised whole Oral Torah.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 07, 2019, 04:43:21 AM
What a memory did they have when they memorised whole Oral Torah.

They didn't organize gay parades, so they had time to concentrate.
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 07, 2019, 04:44:52 AM
"The number of disciples kept diminishing, ever new calamities came about, the Roman government expanded in the world, becoming ever stronger, and the Israelites wandered and became dispersed to the ends of the world. He (Rabbi Yehudah the Prince) therefore composed a (highly condensed) work (the Mishnah) to be available to all, so that they would be able to study it speedily and (the vast amount of details) would not be forgotten" (Rambam, Introduction to his Mishneh Torah). The continuing deterioration of social conditions necessitated the composition of the Talmud, and the later Rabbinical commentaries and codifications, in order to preserve the understanding of the Oral Torah for subsequent generations of Jews (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 37).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Noachide on June 07, 2019, 06:58:13 AM
They didn't organize gay parades, so they had time to concentrate.
:::D
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 09, 2019, 11:21:51 AM
The "Oral Torah" includes the specific explanations of the "Written Torah." In reality, though, as the Torah is Divine Wisdom, it reflects the infinity of G-d.14

14 The Sages expressed this in terms of: "the Holy One, blessed be He, and the Torah are one" (see Zohar I:24a; ibid. II:90b), in the sense that "Inasmuch as You are within them (the Divine Attributes which transcend creation), whoever separates one from another of these ten Attributes (which include Divine Wisdom), it is considered as if he had effected a separation in You (G-d forbid)" (Tikkune Zohar, Introduction II) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 38).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 10, 2019, 04:57:30 PM
"Its measure is longer than the earth and wider than the sea" (Job 11:9). Its teachings and meanings are innumerable, ranging from the traditional simple meaning of the actual text to the most profound mystical insights.15

15 Thus we speak of four dimensions of traditional meaning in the Torah: the simple meaning of the text, the allusions, the hermeneutical interpretations, and the mystical meanings. These four levels are summarized in the Hebrew acronym PaRDe"S (literally "orchard" or "garden") in context of the Talmudic passage in Tractate Hagigah 14b of the "four who entered the Pardes." See Zohar Hadash, Tikunim 107c; and ibid. 102b; Zohar I:26b, and ibid. III:110a and 202a. Ramban, Introduction to his Commentary on the Torah. See Rabbi J. I. Schochet, The Mystical Tradition, pp.36-38 and 119ff (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 38).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 12, 2019, 08:20:28 PM
Moreover, the teachings of the Torah apply to all circumstances and conditions, at all times and in all places. Thus it would be impossible to contain this infinity in any finite depository. To this end the Almighty revealed to Moses a set of rules for valid hermeneutical interpretation, to draw legitimate conclusions from the established principles.16 These rules underlie the Rabbinic analysis and discussions in the Talmud and later writings that explain how practical codifications and rulings are in accordance with G-d's will.

16 See Midrash Tanhuma Ki Tissa 16; Midrash Shemot Rabbah 14:6. These rules appear in Torat Kohanim (Sifra), introductory section; Mishnat Rabbi Eliezer - Midrash Shloshim u 'Shtayim Midot, parsha I and II (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 38).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 14, 2019, 02:05:45 AM
The Talmud recalls an incisive anecdote to illustrate the significance and centrality of the tradition known as the "Oral Torah:"

A Gentile came to the famous sage Hillel, and stipulated that he could believe only in the "Written Torah," rejecting a priori the "Oral Torah." Hillel patiently accepted the challenge and started teaching him the letters of the Hebrew alphabet: "This is an aleph, this is a bet, this is a gimmel, this is a dalet," and so forth. The following day he taught him the letters in reversed order. The Gentile protested: "This is not what you taught me yesterday!" Hillel responded:

"Obviously you must rely on me to know the truth. So, too, you must rely on me with respect to the 'Oral Torah'."17

17 Tractate Shabbat 31a; for a similar incident see Midrash Kohelet Rabbah 7:8 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 38-39).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 16, 2019, 02:40:52 AM
In short, the "Written Torah" and the "Oral Torah" are inseparable. There is total inter-dependence between them. This affects not only Jewish Torah Law and practice, but also the Torah's Noahide Code.

In the "Written Torah" there are only three explicit verses containing precepts addressed to Noah and his descendants: Genesis 9:4-6. Even these three require the traditional interpretation to extract their precise meanings. Without the "Oral Torah" tradition, it is equally impossible to have a codex of the universal precepts relating to Gentiles.18

18 See Kuzary III:73 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 39).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 17, 2019, 06:44:50 AM
To be sure, the prescriptions of the Noahide Code are, on the surface, self-evident principles required for appropriate (i.e. civilized) conduct. Common sense would seem to be sufficient to dictate their observance. Any rational person will readily concede that murder, stealing, illicit sexual relationships, and the absence of an authoritative legal system, and so forth, are harmful to human survival. It is impossible to have a society based on anarchy, with all people acting as they please. Thus from time immemorial, in places where the Noahide Code was forgotten, all groups of humans, from the most primitive to the most sophisticated, still devised some legal code of rules to define acceptable and unacceptable behavior for internal governance (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 39).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 19, 2019, 02:57:29 AM
Those man-made systems, however, were - and are - no more than convenient social contracts to safeguard self-preservation. Individuals or societies that adopt them are indeed wise, for they serve practical or utilitarian purposes. They do not constitute, however, a sense of enduring morality, and they are most certainly devoid of any true religious significance (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 39).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 20, 2019, 02:43:51 PM
This, then, is the substance of the ruling by Rambam (Maimonides) cited above to introduce our theme. Piety, repentance, righteousness, and reward of a hereafter are religious concepts. They have meaning in a religious context only (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 39).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 22, 2019, 05:41:12 AM
The very idea of a Noahide Code per se, then, presupposes acknowledgment of both the "Written Torah" and its inseparable corollary of the tradition of the "Oral Torah." Without these there is no authentic Noahide Code. Without the foundation of a firm belief in the Revelation at Sinai of both the written text of the Torah and the authentic tradition of its explication, there is no code prescribing a truly moral or religious system for mankind. Proper observance and understanding of the details of the Noahide commandments, therefore, presupposes implicit acceptance of both the "Written Torah" and the "Oral Torah" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 39-40).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 23, 2019, 05:48:23 PM
There was a chain of transmission of the Oral Torah after the revelation at Mount Sinai, with a great spiritual leader and Sage in each generation who would lead a court of Sages to whom he taught the Oral Torah. In addition, they and their thousands of disciples taught the Oral Torah to the Jewish people in each generation. (See Rambam's Introduction to his Mishneh Torah.) These leaders who ensured the transmission of the Oral Torah were:

From the L-rd G-d to:

(1) Moses our teacher, greatest of all Prophets

(2) Joshua, along with Elazar (son of Aaron)

(3) Phinehas (or Pinhas, son of Elazar and High Priest)

(4) Eli the Judge and High Priest

(5) Samuel the Prophet

(6) King David

(7) Ahiyah the Prophet

8. Elijah the Prophet

(9) Elisha the Prophet

(10) Yehoyada the High Priest

(11) Zehariah the Prophet

(12) Hosea the Prophet

(13) Amos the Prophet

(14) Isaiah the Prophet

(15) Micah the Prophet

(16) Joel the Prophet

(17) Nahum the Prophet

(18) Habakkuk the Prophet

(19) Zephaniah the Prophet

(20) Jeremiah the Prophet

(21) Baruh the Scribe (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 40).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 26, 2019, 07:52:08 AM
(22) Ezra the Scribe, whose court included the Prophets Haggai, Zehariah, Malahi and Daniel, as well as Hananiah, Mishael, Azariah, Nehemiah, Mordehai, Zerubavel and Shimon the Righteous.

(23) Shimon the Righteous, High Priest and Sage

(24-34) The main receivers of the Oral Torah in the following eleven generations are listed, for example, by Rambam in his Introduction to the Mishneh Torah.

(35) In generation 35, Rabbi Yehudah the Prince, a direct patrilineal descendant of King David, wrote down the Oral Torah in a brilliant abbreviated form, called the Books of the Mishnah, for widespread public use. Before this time, the Prophets and Sages who received the Oral Torah in each generation kept private notes on what they learned as oral lessons from their teachers (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 41).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 27, 2019, 06:00:02 PM
In the words of Rambam: "He (Rabbi Yehudah) gathered together all the traditions, all the enactments, and all the explanations and interpretations that had been heard from Moses or that had been deduced by the courts (of Prophets and Sages) of all the generations in all matters of the Torah; and he wrote the Book of the Mishnah from all of them. And he taught it in public, and it became known to all Israel; everyone wrote it down and taught it everywhere, so that the Oral Law would not be forgotten from Israel." See footnote 13 above for the societal challenges that prompted Rabbi Yehudah to undertake this challenge to preserve the Oral Torah (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 41).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on June 29, 2019, 01:35:04 PM
(36-39) In the 36th generation, Rabbi Yohanan wrote down the Jerusalem Talmud in the Land of Israel about three hundred years after the destruction of the Second Temple. In the 39th generation (100 years later), the Sage Rav Ashe wrote down the Babylonian Talmud (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 41).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 01, 2019, 05:15:20 PM
This historically well-known sequence proves that the Oral Torah, as recorded in the Mishnah and the Talmud, was transmitted orally from one leading Sage to another in an unbroken chain, as continually studied by hundreds of thousands of Jews in every generation, and that the conclusions in these and other books of the Oral Torah are the Word of G-d - this being the Oral Torah that was given to Moses at Mount Sinai (See Rambam, loc. cit.) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 41).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 02, 2019, 06:23:15 PM
FUNDAMENTALS OF THE FAITH

CHAPTER 1

Awareness of G-d1

The basic foundation and the first principle of faith is to know that there is a Primary Being who brought all existence into being. All of the entities in the spiritual and physical realms come into existence only from the truth of His Being.

1 Based on Rambam, Laws of Foundations of the Torah 1:1-7 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 42).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 04, 2019, 09:20:41 PM
In a note that Rambam wrote on his Commentary on the Mishnah, he explained, "Know that one of the great fundamental principles of the Torah of Moses is that our universe is a new entity, created and formed by G-d out of absolute nothingness ... the non-existence of the universe before the beginning of time ... proves G-d's existence absolutely, as explained in the Guide for the Perplexed" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 42).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 06, 2019, 08:48:19 AM
This Being is the G-d of the universe and the Master of the entire earth. He controls the spheres and the entire universe with infinite and unbounded power that continues without interruption.3

3 G-d's complete knowledge and control of all creation extends to His continuous power of individual Divine Providence (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 42).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 08, 2019, 03:42:06 AM
This G-d is one, and only can be one, and not two or more. He is one with a complete unification that surpasses any of the types of unity that are part of the created realms; He is not one in the manner of a category that includes multiple individual entities, nor one in the manner of a body that is divided into portions or dimensions. Rather, He is completely unified, and there exists no unity similar to His within the created realms (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 42).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 09, 2019, 11:05:48 AM
The created realms include the physical and the spiritual, to the peak of levels, and G-d's Unity transcends them all entirely. Thus it is impossible for a human or an angel to conceive of the true nature of His Unity. G-d has neither physical nor spiritual dimensions, as it is said (I Chr. 29:10-13), "L-rd, Yours is (i.e., to You, in Your Essence, belong) the greatness, the power, the glory, the victory, and the majesty, even everything in Heaven and earth" - and none of these spiritual attributes are of His unknowable Essence (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 42).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 11, 2019, 06:11:17 AM
If there were multiple gods, they would be limited to some type of spiritual body and form, because similar but distinct entities coexisting on the same level are separated from each other through limitations that are associated with body and form.5

5 This limitation applies to the spiritual creations referred to as angels; see Rambam, Laws of Foundations of the Torah 3:3-8 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 42-43).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 12, 2019, 01:42:13 PM
If G-d were to have body and form, He would be limited and defined, because it is impossible for there to be a body which has no limitation. Everything that has limitation and definition, by virtue of its body, also has a limited and bounded power. G-d's ability and power have no limitation or boundary, so therefore His power cannot be the power of a body. And since He does not have a body or any form, He cannot be affected by any circumstances that can affect a body, as for example the effects of being separate from another entity. Thus it is impossible for Him to be anything other than one (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 43).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 14, 2019, 09:27:03 AM
Why then are we not overwhelmed by the presence of unlimited Godliness? His infinite power includes His ability to limit the revelation of His Godliness to His creations. Note the explanation by Rashi on Gen. 1:1: "Originally it arose in G-d's thought to create the world with the attribute of stern judgment (i.e., with total concealment of Godliness); He saw, however, that the world could not endure, so He combined with it the attribute of mercy." Rabbi Schneur Zalman explains in The Gate to the Unity and the Faith (ch. 5) that this refers to His revelation of Godliness to mankind through exceedingly righteous individuals (such as Moses) and the signs and miracles recorded in the Torah (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 43).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 15, 2019, 02:53:04 PM
Just as His Existence is of an entirely different nature than that of the created beings, so too, His Truth is incomparable to the truth of the created beings. For all the created beings require Him, and He, blessed be He, does not require them. Therefore, the truth of His Being does not resemble the truth of any of their beings (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 43).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 17, 2019, 02:03:15 AM
The truth of the existence of created beings is relative and subsidiary to, and a result of, the truth of His Being. For they exist only because, and as long as, it is His will that they exist. The creation and sustained existence of the spiritual and physical realms is only a result of G-d's creative speech (Genesis ch. 1) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 43).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 18, 2019, 11:38:03 PM
This is implied by the words of the prophet (Jeremiah 10:10): "G-d your L-rd is true" - i.e., He alone is true, and no other entity possesses truth that compares to His Truth. This is what is meant by the Torah's statement:8 "There is nothing else aside from Him" - i.e., aside from Him, there is no true existence like His.

8 Deuteronomy 4:35; compare Deuteronomy 4:39 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 43-44).
Title: Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
Post by: Hrvatski Noahid on July 20, 2019, 04:08:06 AM
The Torah of Moses

Knowing this fundamental principle - the existence of G-d, blessed be He - was included in the commandment and the warning that prohibited idolatry to Adam the first man and all his descendants.9

9 The commandment to believe in one G-d and no other is included in the prohibition against serving idols, based on one of the Oral Torah's Thirteen Rules for exegesis: "from the negative, one can infer the positive" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 44).