Author Topic: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!  (Read 98375 times)

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Offline muman613

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #200 on: July 01, 2011, 02:28:00 AM »
This article sheds a little more light on what we are talking about:



http://vbm-torah.org/archive/mikdash3/70mikdash.htm

III. HAD DAVID BUILT THE TEMPLE, IT WOULD NEVER HAVE BEEN DESTROYED

            Midrash Tehillim states as follows (Midrash Shocher Tov, Psalm 62):[11]


R. Nechemya states: "'When You render to every man according to his work' (Tehillim 62:13) — what is 'according to his work'?  There is a person who considers committing a sin, but fails to do so; the Holy One, blessed be He, does not ascribe it to him unless he [actually] does it.  If, however, he intended to perform a mitzva, but because of circumstances beyond his control he fails to perform it, the Holy One, blessed be He, ascribes it to him as if he had done it.

From where do you learn this? You learn from David, who painfully wished to build the Temple…  Immediately, the Holy One, blessed be He, appeared to him through Natan, as it is stated: "And it came to pass that night that the word of the Lord came to Natan, saying… You shall build Me a house" (Shmuel II 7:4-5), and another verse states: "You shall not build Me a house wherein to dwell" (I Divrei Ha-yamim 17:4).  How can these two verses be reconciled? Rather, even though your son Shlomo will build it, it will be called by your name."

Indeed, David was worthy to build it, but the prophet Natan came and said to him: "You shall not build a house to My name, because You have shed much blood upon the earth before Me" (ibid. 22:7).  When David heard this, he was frightened and said: "Surely, I have been disqualified from building the Temple!"  R. Yehuda bar Ila'i said: The Holy One, blessed be He, said to him: "Fear not, David, by your life, all the blood that you shed is before Me like that of a gazelle or a deer, about which it is stated: 'The unclean and the clean may eat of it as they do of the gazelle and the deer.  Only you shall not eat the blood; you shall pour it upon the earth like water' (Devarim 12:15-16)."[12]

He said to Him: "If so, why can't I build it?" The Holy One, blessed be He, said to Him: "If you build it, it will stand forever and never be destroyed." He said before Him: "Surely that is good!"  The Holy One, blessed be He, said: "It is revealed and known to Me, that in the future Israel will sin, and I will diffuse My anger by destroying [the Temple], and Israel will be spared."  This is what is written: "He has bent His bow like an enemy… He has poured out His fury like fire" (Eikha 2:4).  The Holy One, blessed be He, said to him: "Even though you will not build it, since you wanted to build it, I will ascribe it to your name."  As it is stated: "A psalm and song at the dedication of the house; of David" (Tehillim 30:1).  It does not say "of Shlomo," but rather "of David." Why?  This is because he desired to build it.  Thus we learn that whoever intends to perform a mitzva, even if, on account of circumstances beyond his control, he fails to do it, the Holy One, blessed be He, regards him as if he had performed it."[13]


            This midrash interprets the bloodshed in question not in accordance with the plain sense of the verses; it sees it as a neutral act (like the slaughter of "a gazelle or a deer") or perhaps even as a positive act (similar to sacrificial offerings — according to the reading of the Pesikta Rabbati, see note 11).  Why, then, was David barred from building the Temple?  The midrash answers that had David built the Temple, it would never have been destroyed, but rather it would have stood eternally and forever.

            The level of eternity will be attained in actual fact only in the future Temple, described in the book of Yechezkel (e.g., 43:9), but not in the two Temples that will precede it.  During the earlier stages, the Temple reflects the spiritual level of Israel, and therefore its existence is conditional upon their state: if their spiritual level is worthy, it will stand, but if not, it will be destroyed.  Had David built the Temple, it would not have been able to give expression to this idea, and therefore, according to these midrashim, David was barred from building it.  Furthermore, the potential gap between the level of Israel and the eternity of the Temple raises the danger that G-d will expend His anger on the nation of Israel directly, whereas a Temple that is not eternal can be destroyed, thereby sparing Israel.



I think this answers some of the question... As I said in my original posting...

Baruch Hashem! , I hope you find my writing pleasant and learned a thing or two from it...


« Last Edit: July 01, 2011, 02:33:13 AM by muman613 »
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #202 on: July 07, 2011, 03:50:33 PM »
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #203 on: July 07, 2011, 04:54:29 PM »
are the ones like I showed you over priced?
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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #204 on: July 07, 2011, 06:11:29 PM »
are the ones like I showed you over priced?



Its been a while since I bought mine... But checking around the web it seems $8.99 for that Kippah is a good deal... The price of a knitted kippah like mine is about $14...

Although this site has many good kippot at reasonable prices...

http://www.judaicawebstore.com/kippahs-C109.aspx
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

Offline angryChineseKahanist

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #205 on: July 07, 2011, 09:47:21 PM »
Wow its making your glasses out of balance! Wait let me pivot my monitor two degrees.

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Offline angryChineseKahanist

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #206 on: July 07, 2011, 09:49:00 PM »
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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #207 on: July 07, 2011, 10:21:40 PM »
Wow its making your glasses out of balance! Wait let me pivot my monitor two degrees.



I think it is my nose which is causing that...
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #208 on: July 07, 2011, 10:24:09 PM »
I just ordered this one this afternoon:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0051SZW86/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?ie=UTF8&m=A3RBRBVVJWY23L


Congratulations.... Maybe someday you will get a Knitted-Kippah.... You may not realize it but the type of Kippah you wear may reveal your political leanings...

Check out what it says on the wiki page:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kippah
Quote
Often the color and fabric of the kippah can be a sign of adherence to a specific religious movement. Knitted or crocheted kippot, known as kippot serugot, tend to be worn by Religious Zionists and the Modern Orthodox,[13] who also wear suede or leather kippot. The hit Israeli TV series, Srugim, which has been compared to the U.S. TV series Friends, takes its name from the knitted kippot worn by the main male characters.

Members of most Haredi groups usually wear black velvet or cloth kippot. In general, the larger the kippah, the more traditionalist the wearer.[14] By contrast, the smaller the kippah, the more modern and liberal the person is.[15]
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

Offline Sveta

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #209 on: July 10, 2011, 04:25:35 AM »
I knew a rabbi who would wear a Harley Davidson kippah. He was very MO and worked with college kids, the first thing they would notice was the kippah.

Anyways, Muman, I always have many questions, I don't know where to begin.

What is it with these women who because of "equality" super feminist anarchy nonsense put on kippahs and go to the kotel and form their feminist minyan, pray Shacharit wear tallit etc...

I read that if they were to read from the Torah at the Kotel they could get arrested. Now, despite my screen name, I have not been to Israel yet, although I will. But it angers me to think, what if I go to the Kotel trying to connect and privately pray and then these women come in trying to look like men and disturbing the environment. There is pressure to give them their "equality" and let them do these things at the Kotel but what about the religious women who don't want to hear or see that? Giving them their "equality" but at the price of the women who don't want to see this. Even women who are not super religious still don't want to see this eye sore. I am not the most religious person but I feel that if I hear these woman doing this, my ears would literally burn. That's just me. I read that Mikhal bat Shaul would wear Tefillin, despite women being exempt from time related Mitzvot. Women are exempt and yet these feminists are doing what men are commanded to do. They don't do it to fulfill any commandments, they just do it to make their feminist statements. It just doesn't make sense to me.

 I don't know, I guess my question is what is your opinion of this and will Israel cave in to pressure of giving these feminists their "equality"?
Am I overreacting? Is this a minor thing or a Chillul Hashem?

« Last Edit: July 10, 2011, 04:49:39 AM by IsraeliHeart »

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #210 on: July 10, 2011, 03:29:31 PM »
I knew a rabbi who would wear a Harley Davidson kippah. He was very MO and worked with college kids, the first thing they would notice was the kippah.

Anyways, Muman, I always have many questions, I don't know where to begin.

What is it with these women who because of "equality" super feminist anarchy nonsense put on kippahs and go to the kotel and form their feminist minyan, pray Shacharit wear tallit etc...

I read that if they were to read from the Torah at the Kotel they could get arrested. Now, despite my screen name, I have not been to Israel yet, although I will. But it angers me to think, what if I go to the Kotel trying to connect and privately pray and then these women come in trying to look like men and disturbing the environment. There is pressure to give them their "equality" and let them do these things at the Kotel but what about the religious women who don't want to hear or see that? Giving them their "equality" but at the price of the women who don't want to see this. Even women who are not super religious still don't want to see this eye sore. I am not the most religious person but I feel that if I hear these woman doing this, my ears would literally burn. That's just me. I read that Mikhal bat Shaul would wear Tefillin, despite women being exempt from time related Mitzvot. Women are exempt and yet these feminists are doing what men are commanded to do. They don't do it to fulfill any commandments, they just do it to make their feminist statements. It just doesn't make sense to me.

 I don't know, I guess my question is what is your opinion of this and will Israel cave in to pressure of giving these feminists their "equality"?
Am I overreacting? Is this a minor thing or a Chillul Hashem?



Shalom IsraeliHeart,

It is good that you have many questions. Jews are supposed to ask questions, which is one reason -- I believe -- that Jews always answer questions which another question.

You too have asked a very deep question, IMHO, and one which I need some time to think about in order to give my best advice. But I do not want you to think I am ignoring your question so I will ask once again that you give me some time to answer.

But the short answer, which is what I believe I will expound upon in my longer answer, is that women should not attempt to act like men. I believe in the Orthodox concepts that men and women are different and yet we are two parts of a whole creation. This belief stems from the Torah which teaches that man and woman were created as Adam and then separated when it was clear that Adam would be lonely and so Chava was formed from Adams side. Thus man and woman are very similar and yet we are different. There are 'feminine' and 'masculine' middot/traits. While it is true that every human has both masculine and feminine traits, he or she is born with particular gender traits. Judaism doesn't believe that we are all 100% equal in all traits. Thus amongst Jews we distinguish Kohen, Levi, or Yisraeli. A Yisraeli can never be a Kohen, nor a Levi. We are born with our particular family, and that is the way we were created.

Women are such awesome creations and they hold a position of high merit in Orthodox belief. The fact that they are not bound/obligated to perform time related mitzvot should be considered a blessing by women. The commentators on the Torah mention several passages which indicate that women may actually be on a higher spiritual level than men, and they were not involved with several of the sins which occurred during the Exodus. Miriam and the women who left Egypt sang at the sea and danced, and the fact that they brought drums was meritorious.

But women who ignore the command concerning wearing articles of clothing of the opposite sex are ignoring an important concept of the Torah. Women are supposed to cover their heads with wigs or hats, but the kippah has been a tradition of men and we hold that tradition {or minhag} is very important to keep, and some minhag even rise to the level of rabbinic mitzvot.

I have read an interesting article concerning the 'myth' that Rashis daughters wore tefillin. I will see if I can find that article online and link to it in my longer response.

I realize this response may be satisfactory... But I look forward to finding references to this topic...

You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #211 on: July 10, 2011, 03:38:57 PM »
I would also like to add this:

I have nothing against women wanting to read Torah. I believe that they should be able to hold services where only women attend. I think it is good for women to be attracted to Torah and there is nothing impure about that aspect. If they are true to the mitzvot and have what is called Deveykus/Clinging to the Torah then they are meritorious.

But if they want to be able to lead men in davening, or hold Torah reading before men, and if the purpose is to assert 'feminist' beliefs then indeed they are committing a Chillul Hashem/Desecration of Hashems name.

You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #212 on: July 12, 2011, 01:05:38 AM »
Thank you Muman :)

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #213 on: July 12, 2011, 09:08:33 AM »

Looks like all the kippahs on amazon are shipped from israel.
They don't make them here? How about in Brooklyn?
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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #214 on: July 13, 2011, 03:36:55 AM »
Looks like all the kippahs on amazon are shipped from israel.
They don't make them here? How about in Brooklyn?


Yes, you can go to any local Judaica store and buy kippahs, kippahs, and more kippahs... And tzit-tzits, and kittels, and Shabbat candles, and menorahs, and all kinds of good stuff... Havdallah Candles... Kosher Cookbooks... Dreidels...









Although some of the good stuff comes from Israel... It is easier to ship in America though... One time I ordered from Israel and it seemed like someone went through my package in shipping {like a monkey}.

« Last Edit: July 13, 2011, 03:44:06 AM by muman613 »
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #215 on: July 15, 2011, 01:48:24 AM »
Quote
I have read an interesting article concerning the 'myth' that Rashis daughters wore tefillin. I will see if I can find that article online and link to it in my longer response.

I found the article and reposted it in the 'Torah & Jewish Idea' forum...

http://jtf.org/forum/index.php/topic,56291.msg511043.html#msg511043
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #216 on: July 18, 2011, 02:01:54 AM »
Excellent Muman, I read it. Thanks

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #217 on: July 21, 2011, 01:12:38 AM »
I'm being a pest again and asking another question. This time about marijuana and Judaism.

So, drugs are evil yes. Alcohol and tobacco are legal but are harmful drugs. So in the case of marijuana, there are some health benefits claimed such as how it may help shrink cancer cells, treat glaucoma, threat migraines, Alzheimer, Seizures, Multiple Sclerosis and much much more.

People say negative things about it, saying that it causes cancer if you smoke it (even though this is not proven) and that is a gateway drug which I do not buy this at all considering that studies have shown that tobacco and alcohol are better predictors of potential drug use.
Then there is the question about dependency. People may become "dependent" on pot...and yet I see people who stop, take long breaks without any discomfort while people who try to quit smoking go insane trying to get some smoke.

Lastly, 1 out 3 americans have tried pot at some point. Pot is not cocaine or meth or the harmful drugs and more people are seeing this.

So being all this said...what does Judaism say about it. I mean people drink alcohol, become terribly drunk but if someone does pot that's the end of the world or something.  The biggest issue I see with religion is that we should follow the law and pot is illegal (unless you're in the Netherlands or Portugal where it is indeed legal). If a Jew were to go to the Netherlands or Portugal where it is legal and get smoke some pot would this be anti-Torah? Keeping in mind that it would not be against the law and that pot is as harmful as alcohol with is legal.

On a latter not there is also hemp...which the THC is so minimal but the potential of good is huge. Hemp can be used for food, clothing, etc... even for fuel. And yet this is illegal in the US too.  Would growing hemp for industrial reasons be against the Torah?

Thanks

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #218 on: July 21, 2011, 04:06:30 AM »
I'm being a pest again and asking another question. This time about marijuana and Judaism.

So, drugs are evil yes. Alcohol and tobacco are legal but are harmful drugs. So in the case of marijuana, there are some health benefits claimed such as how it may help shrink cancer cells, treat glaucoma, threat migraines, Alzheimer, Seizures, Multiple Sclerosis and much much more.

People say negative things about it, saying that it causes cancer if you smoke it (even though this is not proven) and that is a gateway drug which I do not buy this at all considering that studies have shown that tobacco and alcohol are better predictors of potential drug use.
Then there is the question about dependency. People may become "dependent" on pot...and yet I see people who stop, take long breaks without any discomfort while people who try to quit smoking go insane trying to get some smoke.

Lastly, 1 out 3 americans have tried pot at some point. Pot is not cocaine or meth or the harmful drugs and more people are seeing this.

So being all this said...what does Judaism say about it. I mean people drink alcohol, become terribly drunk but if someone does pot that's the end of the world or something.  The biggest issue I see with religion is that we should follow the law and pot is illegal (unless you're in the Netherlands or Portugal where it is indeed legal). If a Jew were to go to the Netherlands or Portugal where it is legal and get smoke some pot would this be anti-Torah? Keeping in mind that it would not be against the law and that pot is as harmful as alcohol with is legal.

On a latter not there is also hemp...which the THC is so minimal but the potential of good is huge. Hemp can be used for food, clothing, etc... even for fuel. And yet this is illegal in the US too.  Would growing hemp for industrial reasons be against the Torah?

Thanks

I have stated my opinion on this topic many times. There was an interesting discussion with a Christian who asked such a question.

The short answer is that Judaism doesn't see anything as completely good or completely bad. Now don't misunderstand what I am saying because there are things which are obviously good and obviously bad. But the point is that in everything that Hashem created there is potential for both good and bad.

I was explaining this to a friend the other day. That virtually everything in the world is a 'double-edged sword' in that it can be used for good, or conversely it can be used for evil. As such I don't believe that Marijuana is evil nor is it completely good.

I have said that there are positive things it can do medically and I hope that we can discover some of the secrets of THC. It is not a secret that I was a 'Hippie' and a 'Deadhead' about 15 years ago and I certainly have experience with the herb.

The Torah relates the story of Noach, who got drunk after the flood receded. For this episode his entire story is stained with a bad ending. What is the lesson? That drinking should not be the first priority. Our first priority should be learning about Hashem and performing the commandments. It is for these things that our father Abraham was meritorious in Hashems eyes.

There is the story of Nadav and Avihu, the sons of Aaron who performed the incense service while intoxicated {according to many commentators and sages}. From this we learn that we should not daven to Hashem while intoxicated. It is also clearly written that a Kohen cannot perform the service in the Holy of Holies while intoxicated.

But one the other hand wine is a big part of many Jewish rituals. And it is a mitzvah to drink on occasion, most notably on Purim and on Pesach. Again, it is my opinion, that the lesson is that we should do things in moderation and not over-indulge in even the acceptable things.

On the topic of Marijuana I have expressed my desire to keep it 'Medical Marijuana' which can be gotten with a competent doctors prescription here in California. I am against general 'legalization' so that it can be sold in liquor stores because I believe then it will fall into the hands of too many young kids who may be distracted from their studies. I did not start to smoke pot till I was 20 years old. Many kids today start much younger...

See this thread for the discussion I referred to at the beginning:

http://jtf.org/forum/index.php/topic,53169.0.html
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #219 on: July 21, 2011, 04:19:14 AM »
Great I am reading through the thread right now.

I've always felt conflicted. Convincing myself it's not bad, then not good etc..etc.. I will read more of the thread. Thanks.


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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #220 on: December 26, 2011, 06:24:46 PM »
I can smell it...

You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #221 on: April 15, 2012, 03:10:16 PM »
Muman...is it better to not say a prayer rather than to do so without kavanah? I mean if you're just not "feeling it".

« Last Edit: April 15, 2012, 03:23:25 PM by IsraeliHeart »

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #222 on: April 17, 2012, 02:29:57 AM »
Muman...is it better to not say a prayer rather than to do so without kavanah? I mean if you're just not "feeling it".

Shalom IsraelHeart,

I appreciate your question and I hope I can answer it in a good way.

Regarding Kevanah/Intention... It is very important to have the correct Kevanah during prayer. Jewish prayer can become repetitive because we read the same prayers, day after day, with minor modifications and insertions into the Siddur/{Order of prayers}.

We are instructed that prayer should feel like a face to face meeting with a good friend, our Father and our King {Avinu Malkanu}. With this intention we should attempt to speak the prayer softly, moving our mouths, loud enough to hear ourselves but not too loud so that it interferes with others prayers.

Sometimes when my mind wanders I begin to lose concentration. There are times when a thought will enter your mind while davening and it will eventually become a distraction. This is one reason we try to avoid davening near windows with views which may distract us from our prayers.

Sometimes the people in my minyan start davening faster than I can read and understand. Often I find myself a page or two behind others and then I have to either catch up, or skip some of the prayers, or I do as some do and read the beginning of the paragraph, and the end of the paragraph, so that I can respond to important parts of the davening such as Kedusha, Shemone Esre, Shema, Shira HaYam, or Kaddish. But I always attempt to contemplate the words {which I read in hebrew but comprehend in english}. Names of Hashem such as the tettragramaton , elokim, chesed, rachaman, gevurah, gadol, teferret, kadosh, Shalom, shakai, etc. I comprehend these names... I also often scan the english translation before I read the hebrew and this way I know basically what I am saying, and after doing so for many years I recognize the prayers in hebrew now.

It is said that we should comprehend the words in our more familiar language first so that we know what we are saying. But it is good to learn the hebrew and use the Holy Tongue when we daven.

These are my personal recommendations, and the way that I have been davening for ten years now. I have become more proficient at davening by doing so every day, and it becomes a part of you, and it strengthens you.



http://www.torah.org/advanced/weekly-halacha/5761/behar.html

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WHAT CAN ONE DO IF HIS KAVANAH IS BEING DISTURBED?

Proper kavanah is the most important ingredient of davening. Consequently, it sometimes overrides other halachos. Therefore: If a sefer falls to the floor and that interferes with one's kavanah, he may pick it up after finishing the blessing that he is presently reciting(14). This may be done even if he needs to take a few steps in order to pick up the sefer(15). If, however, the fallen sefer does not disturb his kavanah, then he may not pick up the sefer during Shemoneh Esrei(16). Each individual needs to judge for himself if it is better for him to daven with a siddur or not, since some people concentrate better if they daven from a text, while others have better kavanah davening with their eyes closed(17). If one begins davening without a siddur and suddenly requires one in order to continue davening properly, he may go and get one if he knows its exact location. He many not, however, start searching around for a siddur(18).

If one is davening and is in doubt of a halachah concerning the Shemoneh Esrei, he may go and look up the halachah in a sefer. If he has no other choice, he may even ask another person what the halachah is(19). This should be relied upon only when not resolving his question might invalidate the Shemoneh Esrei(20).

A child [or an adult(21)] who is disturbing the davening may be signaled to with hand motions. If that does not work, one may walk away from the disruptive child [or walk over to the child to quiet him down(22)], but he may not talk to him in order to quiet him down(23). It is proper for a father to show his child where and what to daven before Shemoneh Esrei begins. Even if this will cause the father to start his Shemoneh Esrei later than the tzibur, he should still do so(24). If someone is knocking on the door or ringing the bell, or if the telephone rings during Shemoneh Esrei and it is interfering with his concentration, one may walk to the door and open it, or walk to the phone and lift the receiver off the hook. He may not speak, however(25).
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

Offline muman613

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #223 on: April 17, 2012, 02:33:53 AM »
Here is another good article excerpt which discusses the importance of kavanah during prayer...


http://www.shemayisrael.com/parsha/chrysler/archives/shoftim64.htm

One should Daven in a fixed place in Shul, as this adds dignity to one's Tefilah, and lends it a touch of importance. One should try to Daven facing a wall, so as not to be distracted by people passing by, or by anything else that might interfere with one's concentration. And by the same token, one should either look in a Sidur or close one's eyes during Davening, as this too, makes it more difficult to be distracted, and augments one's concentration.

One should go to Shul primarily in order to Daven, not to meet with friends, read notices or involve oneself in whatever activities are going on there. If any of these are truly necessary, then they should be performed before Davening or afterwards, but certainly not during Davening, nor is it a Mitzvah to make a mental note of every fellow Jew who enters the precincts of the Shul or who leaves it.

One should enunciate every word slowly, since every word is part of Tefilah, which is called 'Avodah', and it is not respectful to rush through an Avodah. Besides, Davening word for word is a sign of love, which explains Chazal's analogy comparing Tefilah to someone counting his money.

One should take great care to answer every 'Amen' carefully, slowly and with Kavanah, and how much more so 'Borchu' 'Kadish', 'Kedushah' and 'Yehei Sh'mei Rabo'.

One should dress respectfully, which includes wearing a jacket and socks, and it goes without saying that one's body and one's clothes should be clean. Indeed, one would be expected to appear before the King of Kings and to behave in His presence with as much respect as one would before a king of flesh and blood.

Just as one Davens with sincerity, as we already explained (like a poor man standing at the door), so too, should one bow down (four times in the course of the Amidah) with sincerity, like one would bow before a king - in total subjugation. One should familiarize oneself with the various sections of Davening (in Shachris, i.e. Birchas ha'Shachar, Pesukei de'Zimrah, Birchas Sh'ma, Sh'ma and the Amidah), and their progressive levels of Kedushah. Besides adding meaning to one's Tefilah, changing gear from one level of Tefilah to another makes one's Tefilah that much more exciting, and makes it that much easier to Daven with more Kavanah throughout.

Chazal have already pinpointed landmarks in Davening, sections in the Tefilah that require more Kavanah (such as the first Pasuk of the Sh'ma, the first B'rachah of the Amidah, the B'rachah of 'ho'Keil ha'Kodosh' and 'Modim' to mention just some of them). But it is a good idea to add landmarks of one's own, parts of the Tefilah from which one draws personal inspiration for whatever reason. Reaching that point in the Tefilah will then serve as an incentive to increase one's Kavanah.

Many of the hints that we have mentioned (such as running to Shul, Davening verbally and closing one's eyes during Davening) may well be the result of Kavanah; but they also lead to it. As the commentaries explain, a person's external actions have a profound affect on one's internal self.

Finally, it is a good idea to actually look in a Sidur whilst Davening. The G'ro already points out that doing so helps to dispel evil thoughts. In addition however, there is much to be said in using as many senses as possible in the course of our Davening. Besides the sense of smell, we even employ our sense of touch during Tefilah, as now and again, we touch our Tefilin, and when we kiss our Tzitzis. And we certainly make use of our sense of speech and of hearing as we alternate between Davening ourselves and hearing the recital of the Chazan. So why not go one step further and use our sight too, in the service of Hashem, by looking inside a Sidur?
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #224 on: April 17, 2012, 02:45:30 AM »
If you are interested in the source of the idea of 'moving your lips' in prayer, here is an article from Chabad:



http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/3241/jewish/What-is-Prayer.htm
What is Prayer?
By Y. Hechel Greenberg

If we are to fully appreciate what prayer means to a Jew, we should first of all get our terms straight.

The common term used for prayer for those with a Yiddish background is to daven (pronounced daa-ven) and there are various theories where the word "daven" came from. Some say that "daven" comes from the Hebrew word dovaiv, which means "to move the lips." Davening is when Jews move their lips. We don't pray silently; we pray verbally, vocalizing our prayers.

I once heard a theory from an old man in Seattle, Washington, that daven is an Aramaic word; it comes from the word d'avuhon, which means, "from our fathers." According to the Talmud, it was our forefathers, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, who first instituted prayer: Abraham was the first to pray the morning prayer, Isaac, the afternoon prayer, and Jacob, the evening prayer. So since prayers originate with our fathers, d'avuhon, it's called "davening".

In Hebrew, the word for prayer is tefilah. What does the word tefilah mean? There are two translations that are literal and accurate. The word tefilah comes from the word pellel which means "to judge." Tefilah is a time of self-evaluation, self-judgment, introspection, when a person takes the time to focus on himself and goes within himself to see what it is that he needs, what it is that he is all about, what are his faults, what are his qualities, what is it that he needs from G-d, and why should G-d give it to him. This self-assessment process happens through tefilah.

On another level, in another translation, tefilah means "attachment." When we daven, we create a bond between ourselves and our Creator. Prayer is a process of putting things together. When we daven there are only two things in the universe, G-d and ourselves. The problem is that there are two entities when they should be united as one. Tefilah remedies the problem and turns them into one. So tefilah is the process by which we begin looking at ourselves, focusing on ourselves, and proceed to focus on G-d and bring ourselves close to Him, raising ourselves above the whole succession of life that prevails during the rest of the day.

There is a very famous explanation from the Torah about tefilah. It deals with the incident (Genesis 28:12) when Jacob falls asleep and has a dream in which he sees a ladder standing on the ground and reaching into the heavens. Angels are going up and down the ladder. What is the allegory of the ladder? The Zohar, the primary work of Kabbalah, explains that this ladder joining heaven and earth symbolizes prayer. By means of the ladder of prayer we are capable of alighting, rising and elevating ourselves to the highest level.

Our sages tell us that Jacob's ladder had four rungs. Chassidic teaching identifies four stages in prayer, corresponding to the four parts of the morning Shacharit prayer:
1) P'sukei D'zimra ("Verses of Praise");
2) the blessings that precede the Shema;
3) the Shema;
4) the Amidah -- the "standing" prayer, also known as Shemonah Esrei ("eighteen") because of its original eighteen blessings.

These four stages form a gradual process which allows us to reach the top of the ladder. You can't get to the top in one jump; you have to take it step-by-step. The first step praising G-d.

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http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/3241/jewish/What-is-Prayer.htm
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14