Author Topic: The Divine Code Daily Dose  (Read 2578 times)

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Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #125 on: September 12, 2018, 04:35:56 PM »
If one built a house, or married a woman, or had a child, and then had success three times afterwards, he is permitted to consider this as a sign of his success, and it is permitted for him to set this as a good sign for the future to depend upon; i.e., that if he builds another house, or marries another woman (in a place and time that it is permitted to have more than one wife), or has another child, he will then have success, because this is not soothsaying; rather, the person sees it as an assurance of Divine assistance (a mazal).   

As it is correctly understood in classical Hebrew, a mazal is not a superstition, but a natural destiny which G-d has provided. Since this is a phenomena within the natural creation, there is a logical basis for allowing oneself to rely upon it, in the manner described (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 245).   

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #126 on: September 13, 2018, 08:49:00 AM »
Likewise, if one tests a medicinal charm three times and has success each time (such as through an amulet worn by a sick person), even though he doesn't know how it might work, but only that it is a repeatable good charm, it is permitted to use it based on this (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 245). 

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #127 on: September 14, 2018, 02:49:06 PM »
Gentiles are not liable to capital punishment by a court for compelling a forced sale (although theft in general is a capital sin for Gentiles). The reason for this (as explained in footnote 1) is that even though the owner has distress over the incident, he accepts the sale and he does not lose any net monetary value (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 654). 

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #128 on: September 15, 2018, 12:20:29 PM »
Although the courts do not give capital punishment for forcing a sale, the forcer will nevertheless be punished harshly by G-d for this sin. Furthermore, if the courts do not establish laws and punishments that will deter this, people will be less stringent in general, and they will think that if they also commit extortion or rob a small amount, they will avoid the authority of the court. This tendency to leniency obviously applies to robbing something that is less than a perutah in value. It also applies to stealing small amounts of money that people will normally not take the trouble to claim in court, and for which they will not normally call on law enforcement to report the robbery (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 654-655). 

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #129 on: September 16, 2018, 05:01:50 PM »
The structure of the Hebrew words used by Abraham to name G-d is significant. He proclaimed to the world that G-d's name is "E-l olom," in which the word "E-l" (G-d) is attached directly to the word "olom" (universe), with no letters intervening. If Abraham had used the phrase "E-l ha'olom" (explicity stressing "G-d of the universe"), it would have left the impression that the universe is a separate entity from G-d Himself. Abraham's declaration of "E-l olom" stresses that there is in fact no true separation between G-d and the universe. Rather, the universe is nothing more than an emanation of G-d's power, which is united with G-d Himself in total unity. Therefore, when we bless G-d that He is "King of the universe," we are praising His rulership over the physical realm, while bearing in mind the lesson from Abraham that intrinsically, the universe and all its inhabitants are no more than an expression of G-d's creative power and His inner will. With this realization, a faithful person will naturally be motivated from love and awe of the immanently present Essence of G-d to dedicate his entire life to his direct source in Godliness, by serving Him and fulfilling His will (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 143).   

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #130 on: September 18, 2018, 01:42:40 PM »
One who hits a pregnant woman and kills her embryo,31 or a doctor who performs an abortion - by which process the embryo cannot possibly live,32 or a doctor who gives the mother medicine for the purpose of aborting the embryo or killing it in place, or a pregnant woman who took this action herself,33 are all liable to be punished for murder in a court of law.

31 Rashi on Tractate Sanhedrin 57b.

32 Although it may be possible to place the aborted embryo in an incubator and it would survive, if the doctor does not intend to do so and the baby is not put in an incubator, this is considered murder.

33 Since the abortion-inducing medicine will surely take effect in her body, it is tantamount to the case where one pushes a victim into a pit where he will surely die from hunger or lack of air, and as explained in topic 2 above, this is considered direct murder for a Gentile.

Although Rambam, Laws of Murderers ch. 6, differentiates between a murder caused directly from one's own power or that comes as a result of one's actions, this difference applies only for inadvertent killing and for a Jew, as opposed to an intentional murder caused by a Gentile, who is liable for indirect murder (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2011, p 384).

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #131 on: September 20, 2018, 04:13:28 AM »
This Third Edition of The Divine Code contains eight main Parts. Each Part contains numbered chapters, and each chapter contains numbered "topics." Thus, Part I, topic 6:2, refers to topic 2 of Chapter 6 within Part I. In this edition, we have placed the Editor's notes as added footnotes marked by an asterisk (*); these include commentary or additional information. Also, several errors that were found in the recent Limited Edition, in the cross-referencing of the renumbered footnotes, have been corrected (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 21).   

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #132 on: September 21, 2018, 12:17:22 AM »
To make the footnoted citations of Rabbinic sources more meaningful, a bibliography for the book has been provided on our Web site, with short historical information on the source texts and their authors.7 The sources are generally cited using our transliterations of their Hebrew titles. The exceptions are the citations of section titles in Rambam's Mishneh Torah, which are translated into English for the benefit of those who wish to look up the citations in a translation of Mishneh Torah. For this purpose, these translated titles match, or nearly match, the titles as they appear in the Mishneh Torah volumes that have been published in English by Moznaim (Brooklyn, New York; translated by Rabbi Eliyahu Touger). This series has been a valuable asset for our translation of the topics in Sheva Mitzvot HaShem, many of which follow the wording of Mishneh Torah.

7 https://asknoah.org/wp-content/uploads/the-divine-code-bibliography.pdf (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 21-22).

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #133 on: September 22, 2018, 01:03:42 AM »
In Part I, Chapters 1-4 present basic principles of Torah-based faith in the One G-d, acceptance of the truth of the Torah, acknowledgment that Divine rewards accrue from observance of G-d's will, and that the opposite (G-d forbid) accrues from deliberate, or sometimes careless, transgressions of His will. In Chapters 5-6 and 8-9, we present a practical and reliable guide to subjects that are of prime importance in daily life: Torah Study, Prayer, Moral Conduct, and Repentance. A few topics may seem outdated (e.g., Chapter 7 in Part I, and Chapter 4 in Part II, which have been significantly shortened; and Chapter 4, after topic 1, in Part V). However, this provides more material from Torah sources for Gentiles to study, and by learning how the general rules applied in those cases, one can see how to apply those rules in a situation that might be encountered today. In this new edition, a few editing updates have been made for additional clarity (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 22).