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Offline Irish Zionist

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #100 on: February 07, 2010, 10:53:11 AM »
Carrying: carrying from a private to a public domain and vice versa, or carrying in the public domain

Whats this mean?
The banding together by the nations of the world against Israel is the guarantee that their time of destruction is near and the final redemption of the Jew at hand.
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Offline muman613

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #101 on: February 07, 2010, 11:53:20 AM »
Carrying: carrying from a private to a public domain and vice versa, or carrying in the public domain

Whats this mean?

This is the prohibition of carrying an item from within your home {a private domain} to the outside {a public domain}. This prohibition doesnt allow us to carry any items, including keys, money, wallets, etc. from within our homes to the outside. There is a rabbinic ordinance which involves creating a Erev {A seperation} which is a demarcation in the public area {either a wall, or a string strung thoughout the community} which allows a Jew to carry items.

Here is what Chabads 'Ask Moses' Rabbi says about this topic:

http://www.askmoses.com/en/article/208,2104816/What-s-the-deal-with-carrying-on-Shabbat.html

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What’s the deal with carrying on Shabbat?

One word of introduction before we start: Shabbat is a day of “rest”. Not rest as in “weekly-vacation”; rather, Shabbat is a breather from the mundane things in life - to allow us to focus on our spiritual side. Accordingly, the Torah prohibits those activities that are normally associated with the everyday aspects of our lives.

One of the 39 weekday activities (see What are the 39 Melachot?) that the Torah bans on Shabbat is “carrying” or “transfer of objects.” “Carrying” is achieved by lifting an object from one area and placing it down in another or by throwing or dragging an article from one location to another. If you have something in your pocket, you “lift” it as you begin walking and “place it down” the moment you stand still.

This law hinges on four “domains”.1 Once you understand what each of these is, you should find it relatively easy to determine where, what and how you can carry on Shabbat.

1) Reshut HaYachid a.k.a. Private property

Your home, garden, and even your car (while parked on the street) qualify as a “private domain”. The legal definition of such a property requires that it:

    *  Has a single owner,
    * Occupies a minimum area of 4 sq. Tefachim2 (12.6 sq. in. or 32 sq. cm) AND
    * Is fenced in with a 10 Tefachim (31.5 in. or 80 cm) or higher wall.3 OR
    * Stands on a platform with four sides that are 10 Tefachim high.

On Shabbat you’re allowed to carry whatever you’d like (provided it is not muktzeh [see What is "Muktzeh"?]) - as much as you’d like - in a Reshut Hayachid. For example, you may rearrange all your furniture in your home on Shabbat (though that’s not really in line with true Shabbat spirit).

If you own two adjoining properties, you’re allowed to carry objects from one to the other. On the other hand, if you stay in a hotel (where each guest’s room is their own for the duration of their stay) or an apartment building, you may not carry anything out of your hotel room or apartment.

Tenants or hotel residents can organize an Eruv Chatzerot to allow them to carry in these areas. This procedure comprises taking some food (usually matzah) from each tenant and storing it in a central location. Alternatively, one representative can purchase a box of matzah on behalf of the other tenants. One representative makes the relevant blessing over the Eruv, followed by a declaration that this Eruv permits all tenants to carry throughout the building on Shabbat. (See What is an Eruv?)

2) Reshut HaRabim a.k.a. The Public domain

Times Square or the Autobahn might qualify for this title. To be considered a real public domain, an area must:

    * Have no roof,
    * Not have walls or partitions on three or more sides,
    * If it is in a city, pass right through the whole city,
    * Have a width of at least 16 Amot4 (25.2 ft. or 7.68m)5

Some authorities say that a Reshut HaRabim needs to handle a daily traffic flow of 600,000 people. (That’s because when the Torah introduced the concept of a Reshut HaRabim, it referred to the Jewish camp in the desert .6 The official census of that group equaled 600,000.)

The Torah stipulates that you may not transfer any object from a Reshut HaYachid to a Reshut HaRabim or vice-versa on Shabbat. You are not even allowed to carry an object for more than four Amot (6.3 ft. or 1.92 m) within a Reshut HaRabim on Shabbat.7

3) Carmelit a.k.a. what average people consider public property

From what you’ve read so far, you’re probably wondering why we may not carry our Talit, purse or baby’s bag to Shul on Shabbat. After all, our suburban streets hardly qualify for Reshut HaRabim status, so the Torah would apparently have no problem with our carrying into or through these areas.

Our Sages realized that most people refer to any public property - regardless of traffic volumes or size - as just that: Public property. So, the average person would get confused if they knew that you could carry in some public areas and not in others. People were bound to conclude that they could carry in a Reshut HaRabim, just as they did on their own street.

To avoid this issue, the Sages introduced the Carmelit principle. According to this rule, all public properties assume the same status on Shabbat.

This means that they forbade you to carry anything from your home (or any other Reshut HaYachid) into the street, shopping mall, park, or any other Carmelit. Neither may you transfer an object from a Reshut HaRabim to a Carmelit, or vice-versa. And, just like you’re not allowed to carry something for 4 Amot in a Reshut HaRabim, you may not do so in a Carmelit.

It is important to note that this Rabbinic law has the full force of a Torah law and may not be neglected.

There is one important caveat:

Since the Sages devised this law, they also devised a system to circumvent it. Remember: The Carmelit law was introduced because public areas resemble a classical Reshut HaRabim. So, if you can make the Carmelit area resemble a Reshut HaYachid, nobody will make the mistake of confusing the two - and there would be no problem carrying in the Carmelit.

So, how do you make the public domain look like it’s privately owned?

You make an Eruv.8

You create an eruv by demarcating an area or suburb with symbolic partitions (usually poles with wire strung from the top of the one to the top of the other, to represent doorways. These would typically need to be placed wherever the area has no existing walls). The residents would then leave food at a specified location to render the entire area the common property of the residents.

This way, an entire neighborhood is made to resemble a private home - with a partition all the way around, and a centralized ownership (represented by the common food).

The exact procedure for establishing such an eiruv is highly complex and a competent rabbi needs to oversee the process.

4) Mekom Petur a.k.a. no man’s land

There are certain places that, according to Jewish law do not qualify as a domain per se. Practically, this means that you are allowed to move an object from such a place to a Reshut HaYachid, Carmelit or even a Reshut HaRabim or vice-versa.

A mekom petur would include any place inside a public area that is less than 4 sq. Tefachim and higher than three Tefachim (9.45 in. or 24cm).9

So, let’s say you’re walking home from shul on Shabbat and discover a piece of paper in your pocket. The best way to avoid desecrating Shabbat would be to place it on the nearest street sign or mound of soil (or other mekom petur).

Today, many established Jewish communities have an Eruv in their neighborhoods. This makes life easier for people who live in those communities. If you live in an area with an Eruv, make sure you know the rules of carrying on Shabbat for when you spend Shabbat in a hotel, vacation resort or a community that does not have an Eruv.
And you shall call out and say before the Lord, your God, "An Aramean [sought to] destroy my forefather, and he went down to Egypt and sojourned there with a small number of people, and there, he became a great, mighty, and numerous nation.
Devarim/Ki Tavo 26:5

Offline Irish Zionist

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #102 on: February 07, 2010, 12:20:51 PM »
1) Does every Jewish person in Israel that (follows Torah of course) do Shabbat. Lets say for instance there is a security situation on Shabbat, is it desecrating Gd's name by acting upon that treat.

2) What about Jewish people in Israel monitoring radar on Shabbat?

3) On Shabbat is there no vehicles driving on the roads in Israel and if there is, is it desecrating Gd's name?
The banding together by the nations of the world against Israel is the guarantee that their time of destruction is near and the final redemption of the Jew at hand.
Rabbi Meir Kahane

Offline muman613

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #103 on: February 07, 2010, 01:22:35 PM »
1) Does every Jewish person in Israel that (follows Torah of course) do Shabbat. Lets say for instance there is a security situation on Shabbat, is it desecrating Gd's name by acting upon that treat.

2) What about Jewish people in Israel monitoring radar on Shabbat?

3) On Shabbat is there no vehicles driving on the roads in Israel and if there is, is it desecrating Gd's name?

Very good questions IZ... I think I know where you are going with this...

The answer to your question is this... Shabbat is done by every Jewish person who obeys the Torah. You know that Shabbat merits one of the 10 Commandments... We just read the 10 Commandments in Shul because we read Parashat Yitro which includes the episode at Mount Sinai and the giving of the 10 Commandments.

The Fourth Commandment reads:

"Remember the Sabbath Day, to keep it holy. Six days you shall labor and do all your work; but the seventh day is a Sabbath unto the Lord your G-d. On it you shall not do any manner of work -- you, your son, your daughter, your man-servant, your maid-servant, your cattle, and your stranger that is within your gates. For in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea and all that in them is, and rested on the seventh day; wherefore the Lord blessed the Sabbath Day, and hallowed it."

Now regarding what happens when a 'security situation' occurs it is very simple... The concept known as "Pikui Nefesh" which means "Saving Lives" becomes relevant. This very important principle allows us to violate every single commandment in the Torah as long as it involves saving a Jewish life. The reason for this is the principle "Save a single life, save the world". And we also learn from Torah "Obey my commandments so that you may live" {my translations are loose and may be inaccurate}.

So it would be absolutely OK for some Jews to carry weapons and be prepared for any life threatening situation. It would be OK for some Jews to operate Radar and other high technology weaponry as long as this would result in the saving of Jewish life from a threat.

Concerning driving.... In current day Israel I believe that some Jews, obviously those who are not Torah Observant Jews, who drive on Shabbat. There is a great outcry by some Haredi Jews because somewhere there is a parking lot which offers free parking on Shabbat. Because of this it encourages Jews to violate Shabbat by driving. Of course I stand against driving in Israel on Shabbat by Jews, and especially driving in Jerusalem on Shabbat.

http://www.yutorah.org/_shiurim/Pikuach%20Nefesh%20Part%20I.html
http://www.yutorah.org/_shiurim/Pikuach%20Nefesh%20Part%20II.html

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Pikuach Nefesh: Saving a Life on Shabbat

Part I

The value of human life is so dear that the Torah mandates violation of Torah law in order to save a life (pikuach nefesh).  Although there are three exceptions to this principle (murder, idolatry and incest), violation of Shabbat is not an exception to the rule.  Therefore, if a life threatening situation arises on Shabbat, one is required to do whatever is necessary to save the life of the individual, even if it means performing a melacha that would otherwise be prohibited on Shabbat.  In fact, the Beraita (cited by the Gemara, Yoma 84b) states that one who is expeditious in saving a life on Shabbat (in a situation that involves performing a melacha) is considered praiseworthy (harei zeh meshubach).  This article will explore the source for performing melacha in a life threatening situation as well as the nature of the mandate to perform melacha.

The Source That Pikuach Nefesh Overrides Shabbat

The Gemara, ibid, quotes numerous opinions as to the source that one violates Shabbat (or other transgressions) in order to save a life.  Two sources emerge as the source that pikuach nefesh overrides Shabbat.  The first is "v'shamru b'nei yisrael et haShabbat" (Shemot 31:16) from which the Gemara derives that one should violate one Shabbat in order that someone else should be able to observe many Shabbatot.  The second source is vachai bahem (Vayikra 18:5), from which the Gemara derives that mitzvot are meant to be a source of life and not the cause of someone's death.  The Gemara then states that the second source is more encompassing than the first source.  The first source may only apply in a situation where a life will definitely be saved through the violation of Shabbat.  The second source applies even in a situation where it is questionable whether a life will be saved.  Tosafot, Yoma 85a, s.v. U'Lifake'ach, note that the second verse serves as the source for the opinion of Shmuel (Gemara, ibid) that lo halchu b’pikuach nefesh achar harov, when it comes to life and death matters statistical data is ignored.  If there is remote possibility of saving someone’s life, all means are employed to do so, even if this entails violation of a Torah prohibition.  Tosafot explain that the verse vachai bahem teaches that a mitzvah can never be a possible factor in the death of an individual.

The Differences Between the Two Sources

R. Naftali Z.Y. Berlin, Ha'Amek She'elah 1:8, and 167:17, introduces a novel difference between the two sources presented above.  As mentioned previously, the source of v'shamru b'nei yisrael et haShabbat only applies to a case where a life will definitely be saved.  R. Berlin proposes that the second source of vachai bahem is limited to a person who is considered a "live" individual.  Thus, the second source does not serve as a source to permit violating Shabbat to save an endangered fetus.  One can only violate Shabbat to save a fetus based on the first source.  However, since the first source only applies to a situation where a life will definitely be saved, R. Berlin suggests that one cannot violate Shabbat to save the life of a fetus in a situation where the life saving mission will have questionable success.

Approximately fifty years prior to the publication of R. Berlin's Ha'Amek She'elah,  Shulchan Aruch HaRav, Kuntrus Acharon 306:1, anticipated the possibility that one can argue that one may not violate Shabbat to save a fetus if the mission has questionable success (a position later to be adopted by R. Berlin).  Shulchan Aruch HaRav rejects this possibility by claiming that the verse vachai bahem encompasses all life threatening situations including the saving of a fetus.  R. Shlomo Zalman Auerbach (cited in Nishmat Avraham Vol. IV, pg 50) rules that R. Berlin's opinion is only accepted in a situation where it is known that the fetus will not survive and Shabbat is violated in order to delay the death of the fetus.  However, if there is any possibility that the fetus will survive, it is treated as a regular case of pikuach nefesh and Shabbat is violated to save the fetus.

The Gemara, Yoma 85a, states that one may even violate Shabbat in a situation where it is known that the life saving mission will only extend the individual's life for a few hours.  Me'iri, ad loc., s.v. HaMishna HaChamishit, explains that the reason why this is permitted is because in those few hours the patient has the opportunity to repent for his sins.  Mishna Berurah, Biur Halacha 329:4 s.v. Ela, notes that Me'iri is operating within the first source for saving a life on Shabbat.  According to the first source – based on the principle that one should violate one Shabbat in order that the patient may observe many more Shabbatot- the life saving mission does not necessarily have to produce the possibility that the patient will be able to observe other Shabbatot.  It is sufficient if he is able to perform other mitzvot.  Me'iri's opinion is that since one can perform the mitzvah of Teshuva in mere seconds, it is worthwhile to violate Shabbat to temporarily extend the life of the patient.  It is implicit from Me'iri's comments that if the patient's state of consciousness does not allow him to perform any mitzvah, one may not violate Shabbat to extend his life. Mishna Berurah posits that most Rishonim accept vachai bahem as the source that one violates Shabbat to save a life.  Accordingly, one would violate Shabbat to extend the life of an individual even in a situation where he will only live temporarily and his state of consciousness does not allow him to perform any mitzvah whatsoever.

Hutrah or Dechuyah

The Gemara, Yoma 83a, quotes a Beraita that if one is in a life threatening situation and his condition requires him to eat one of two types of non-kosher food, he should choose to eat the food item whose violation is less stringent.  [This principle is known as hakal hakal techilah (the lesser one comes first).] For example, if he must choose between neveilah (meat that was not slaughtered properly) and tevel (fruits that were not yet tithed), he should choose the tevel.  This is because one who wantonly eats neveilah is punished through lashes and one who eats tevel is not.

Rabbeinu Asher, Yoma 8:4, discusses a case of someone in a life threatening situation whose condition requires him to eat meat on Shabbat.  The question arises: is it preferable for him to eat neveilah meat, or is it preferable to slaughter an animal on Shabbat so that he may eat a kosher meat?  At first glance, the principle of hakal hakal techilah should dictate that the violation of neveilah, which is only punishable by lashes, should be preferable to the violation of Shabbat whose transgression is punishable by death.  Nevertheless, Rabbeinu Asher presents a few reasons why one should slaughter the animal and forgo the neveilah.  One of those reasons (Rabbeinu Asher attributes this reasoning to Maharam MiRutenberg) is because pikuach nefesh on Shabbat is hutrah (permitted).  This means that Shabbat is suspended in the face of a life threatening situation.  However, the prohibition of eating neveilah is dechuyah (pushed aside) for pikuach nefesh.  This means that the prohibition of eating neveilah remains and the life threatening situation overrides the prohibition.  Since Shabbat is suspended in the face of pikuach nefesh and neveilah is not (but is overridden), it is preferable to slaughter the animal on Shabbat.  [Rabbeinu Asher notes that this is only applicable if there will be no delay in preparing the kosher meat.]

Rashba, Teshuvot HaRashba 1:689, agrees that the question of whether to give the patient neveilah or whether to slaughter the animal on Shabbat is contingent on whether pikuach nefesh on Shabbat is hutrah or dechuyah.  However, Rashba contends that pikuach nefesh on Shabbat is dechuyah and therefore advocates feeding neveilah to the patient.

Some Poskim see the question of whether pikuach nefesh on Shabbat is hutrah or dechuyah as central to many discussions regarding pikuach nefesh on Shabbat (see for example R. Ovadia Yosef, Yechaveh Da'at 4:30).  However, R. Moshe Feinstein, Igrot Moshe, Choshen Mishpat 2:79, claims that the only practical application of the question of hutrah or dechuyah is the case of whether the patient should eat the neveilah or whether it is better to slaughter an animal on Shabbat.  Other issues that may relate to this question will be discussed in the next issue.

http://www.askmoses.com/en/article/192,2230417/From-where-does-the-saying-Save-a-life-save-a-whole-world-originate.html
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Question:

Where does the saying, "save a life, save a whole world" come from? I'm not even sure it's Jewish. Thanks, Milty N.

Answer:

The Talmud asks why the human race was created as a single human being, as opposed to creating many people at once (like the animals which were created en masse1 )?

This teaches us that just as Adam was created in the beginning, and he was the entire human population of the world, likewise we need to look at each individual as if he/she were the entire population of the world. Therefore, when you save one life it is as if you saved the entire world.

Talmud, Sanhedrin 37a states:

"FOR THIS REASON WAS MAN CREATED ALONE, TO TEACH THEE THAT WHOSOEVER DESTROYS A SINGLE SOUL... SCRIPTURE IMPUTES [GUILT] TO HIM AS THOUGH HE HAD DESTROYED A COMPLETE WORLD; AND WHOSOEVER PRESERVES A SINGLE SOUL..., SCRIPTURE ASCRIBES [MERIT] TO HIM AS THOUGH HE HAD PRESERVED A COMPLETE WORLD."

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Devarim
4:1 - So now, Yisra'el, give heed (Yisra'el Sh'ma) to the statutes and ordinances that I am teaching you to observe, so that you may live to enter and occupy the land that Hashem, the G-d of your ancestors, is giving you.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2010, 01:47:54 PM by muman613 »
And you shall call out and say before the Lord, your God, "An Aramean [sought to] destroy my forefather, and he went down to Egypt and sojourned there with a small number of people, and there, he became a great, mighty, and numerous nation.
Devarim/Ki Tavo 26:5

Offline Irish Zionist

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #104 on: February 07, 2010, 02:02:59 PM »
and your stranger that is within your gates.
Stranger as in Jewish or non Jewish?
Forgive my total ignorance but I assumed that all Jewish People are Brothers and Sisters and that they are not strangers.
If I'm correct then are "The Strangers" Gentiles?
And if so, I thought only The Jewish People are allowed to live in Israel.


The banding together by the nations of the world against Israel is the guarantee that their time of destruction is near and the final redemption of the Jew at hand.
Rabbi Meir Kahane

Offline muman613

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #105 on: February 07, 2010, 02:17:00 PM »
and your stranger that is within your gates.
Stranger as in Jewish or non Jewish?
Forgive my total ignorance but I assumed that all Jewish People are Brothers and Sisters and that they are not strangers.
If I'm correct then are "The Strangers" Gentiles?
And if so, I thought only The Jewish People are allowed to live in Israel.

There is the concept of the 'Ger' or the stranger, often referred to as the Proselyte. Generally these 'Strangers' or 'Proselytes' are people who live amongst the Jews but accept the Jewish ways, who are considering conversion.

These might be gentile friends who come to visit or people who are living in the land of Israel who are doing business there.

These strangers in our land should also observe Shabbat. But we cannot force conversion on them. I have lived with non-Jews and I don't insist that they observe Shabbat. I believe that when it speaks of our slaves, or our servants also observing Shabbat I think it is referring to non-Jewish slaves.

http://www.torah.org/learning/livinglaw/5768/vaera.html

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Strangers in our Midst?

The Mitzvah:

There is a commandment "You shall love the proselyte, for you [ Israel] were yourselves strangers in the land of Egypt" (Devarim 10:19 ).

The Jewish community has a Torah obligation to extend the warmest hand to someone who has converted to Judaism.

In addition to the general commandment – itself a primarily axiom of the Torah – to love one's Jewish neighbor (Vayikra 19:18), there is another precept to go the "extra mile" and to shower love upon the ger, proselyte.

He or she is, in effect, the strangers among the midst of the Jewish nation.

The Torah frames this obligation with the potent reminder that the Jewish people were themselves strangers in Egypt. In the exile, they were viciously persecuted by their host country perniciously plotting their downfall. Such intolerance of strangers or aliens, the Jewish people are reminded, did not go unchecked. G-d struck the Egyptians with the Ten Plagues before their Exodus. Similarly, the Children of Israel must be sensitive to their treatment of strangers that are either trying to adjust in a foreign climate and especially for the convert to Judaism.

The proselyte is to be unreservedly admired and respected.

He is, after all, someone who has courageously abandoned his non-Jewish background and upbringing. In the unrelenting quest for truth, with great determination, deep commitment, self-sacrifice and sincerity, the ger has made the leap to enter into the congregation of G-d.

This person is a hero and an inspiration to all his brethren. His story is of a spiritual journey, an odyssey of discovery not that dissimilar to the national experience in the Exodus.

The Jewish nation was entrapped in a web of spiritual contamination. Enslaved in an environment of godlessness, Egypt was a country whose reliance on the Nile rather than on rainfall led the pharaoh to deify himself and brazenly question: "Who is G-d that I should heed His voice?" Thus, the function of the Plagues was for Pharaoh and the Egyptian people to gradually concede the existence of G-d and His Omnipotence.

Once again your question is timely because as I said above, we just read the Portion of Yitro who is held up as the prime Torah example of a righteous gentile who wants to convert to Judaism.

http://www.shemayisrael.co.il/parsha/rosenzweig/archives/yisro63.htm
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PARSHAT YITRO
Shemot (Exodus) 18:1-20:23
Haftorah - Isaiah 6:1-7:6, 9:5-6

A RIGHTEOUS GENTILE

It goes without saying that the main subject of this week's Parsha, Yitro, Moshe's father-in-law, was an unusual man. His words of encouragement and timely advice to Moshe at the outset of the journey of the Jewish people through the wilderness set him apart as the only gentile friend of Israel after the experience of the Exodus. And according to one school of rabbinic thought, Yitro became a convert to Judaism and thus serves as the prototype of the Ger Tzedek, the righteous proselyte. Yitro's name thus becomes synonymous with conversion to Judaism, and he becomes a paradigm figure for those who throughout history have come under the wings of G-d's dominion.

And there is some discussion concerning the meaning of Yitro's name. Our Chazal explain Yitro's name as follows: "At first he was called Yeter, but when he accomplished good deeds, the letter "Vav" (O) was added to his name, and he was called Yitro" (Rashi to Exodus 18:1). Thus Yitro joins Avraham whose name was changed from Avram, and Sarah whose name was changed from Sarai. And in keeping with the biblical tradition of changing an individual's name after the performance of meritorious deeds or the experience of some apocryphal, unusual event.

The question, of course, is asked as to why the letter "Vav" was added to Yitro's name. On the most obvious level, it can be suggested that the letter "Vav" is associated with G-d's name. But it also might be stated the function of the letter "Vav" in Hebrew grammar serves to shed light on the very nature of Yitro's good deeds and his special character.

The first function of the "Vav" in Hebrew grammar, as Rashi notes in his commentary to Exodus 21:1, is to add to the past. Yitro not only provided a refuge for Moshe when he fled from Pharaoh, but he took him into his home and made Moshe his son-in-law. Now Yitro was adding to his original hospitality and warmth by coming to encourage Moshe and the Israelites at this transitional period and time in their history and nascent development.

Secondly, the "Vav" is also called the "conversive Vav," because it changes and transforms the tenses in Hebrew grammar. Yitro suggested to Moshe a far reaching change which transformed the government of the Israelite tribes. A product of the autocratic Egyptian court, Moshe had little confidence in the self-governing capacity of the former Hebrew slaves. And in a benevolent way, he modeled his government after that of Pharaoh, exercising all authority and assuming all responsibility. But Yitro pointed out to his son-in-law that one person, no matter how gifted, could not possibly shoulder the responsibility of governing so many people, and survive. He therefore suggested that Moshe delegate authority to appointed chiefs, to deputies, who must be able men, reverent, truthful and just.

The smaller matters of dispute, those issues needing clarification and resolution, the Torah tells us were judged by these chiefs or deputies. And the more complicated and more important disputes were brought to Moshe for his consideration and judgment. Thus, Yitro presented Moshe with a blueprint for a primitive democracy, for a system of delegated authority and responsibility, an ideal which penetrated the Jewish consciousness in its succeeding generations.

And finally, the "Vav" in Hebrew grammar is also a conjunctive "Vav," which unites and holds together the parts of a sentence. So that in bringing Moshe's wife and children to him at the very outset of Israel's journey through the wilderness, before the Sinaitic Revelation, Yitro was teaching his son-in-law a fundamental truth about Jewish life and leadership. Before Moshe could effectively govern the Israelites, before he could receive the Torah and impart it and teach it to the Jewish people, he had to have within his own life a modicum of family unity and harmony. Moshe had to achieve for himself a level of personal peace and tranquility. Through his action, Yitro was saying to Moshe that the family is, in fact, the undisputed fundamental unit of the Jewish people, around which so much of Jewish life is centered. If it is united, peaceful and harmonious, the unity will radiate throughout the ranks of Israel. And only as a united people Israel could face the awesome dangers of the wilderness and the great challenge and responsibility of becoming a "Kingdom of Priests and a Holy Nation."

The secret of living a long, happy and creative life lies in the realization that underneath life's diversity there is a basic unity - a oneness - in which the spiritual and the material are intertwined. The secret of Jewish survival is to identify with the one G-d, His Torah and His people. And this is what our Talmud meant when they said: "Whoever extends the word 'Echad- One,' in the recitation of the Shema (Hear Oh Israel, Hashem is our G-d, Hashem is One), his days and his years are extended" (Tractate Berachot 13b).

Shabbat Shalom,
Rabbi Yosil Rosenzweig
And you shall call out and say before the Lord, your God, "An Aramean [sought to] destroy my forefather, and he went down to Egypt and sojourned there with a small number of people, and there, he became a great, mighty, and numerous nation.
Devarim/Ki Tavo 26:5

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #106 on: February 08, 2010, 03:51:28 PM »
Shalom Muman, very interesting reading but still trying to understand.

1) What's the difference between Sages, Priest's & Rabbis?
2) Is there any other holy men names I missed and can you explain the difference?
3) When King David ruled The Land of Israel (correct me if I'm wrong) was he the supreme ruler and was Israel a Kingdom or a Holy Nation or both?
4) Did The Jewish People ever have A Holy One to rule over all of Israel like (bad example The Catholic Pope) and if so what was he referred to?
5) Did Judas Judas Maccabeus ever become King of Israel? If not, why and what was he referred to?
6) Was The Land Gd gave to The Israelites Judah, Samaria and Israel all three separate regions, who united them as one and how was this done?
The banding together by the nations of the world against Israel is the guarantee that their time of destruction is near and the final redemption of the Jew at hand.
Rabbi Meir Kahane

Offline muman613

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #107 on: February 08, 2010, 07:12:54 PM »
Shalom Muman, very interesting reading but still trying to understand.

1) What's the difference between Sages, Priest's & Rabbis?
2) Is there any other holy men names I missed and can you explain the difference?
3) When King David ruled The Land of Israel (correct me if I'm wrong) was he the supreme ruler and was Israel a Kingdom or a Holy Nation or both?
4) Did The Jewish People ever have A Holy One to rule over all of Israel like (bad example The Catholic Pope) and if so what was he referred to?
5) Did Judas Judas Maccabeus ever become King of Israel? If not, why and what was he referred to?
6) Was The Land Gd gave to The Israelites Judah, Samaria and Israel all three separate regions, who united them as one and how was this done?

Ok...

Im gonna split this one into two parts... I will try to answer 1-3 then tonight or tomorrow morning I will answer 4-6....

1) What's the difference between Sages, Priest's & Rabbis?

The Torah established for the Jewish people two special tribes dedicated to the spiritual growth of the Jewish people. These two tribes are known as the Kohanim and the Levi'im. The Kohanim are the 'priests' and they perform the daily service in the Holy Temple. The Levi'im are the ones who carry the holy vessels of the Temple and perform the cleaning and maintenance on the Temple. After the temple was destroyed in 70 C.E. the service {Avodah} in the temple ceased. As a result the need for the Kohanim and Levi'im was reduced yet to this day the Jewish people still keep track of who is a Levite and who is a Kohain. When the Third Temple is rebuilt and the service in the temple is resumed the traditional Jewish tribes will resume their service.

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"Kohen" (alt. "Cohen") - (pl. "Kohanim" or "Cohanim") - Priest; Judaism is not a classless society; rather, there are three "classes" within the structure of Jewish society: Kohen, Levi and Yisrael. The Kohen is a descendant of Aharon, the High Priest, the brother of Moshe. His task is to work in the Temple, be involved with the offering of sacrifices, and with Blessing the Congregation of Israel. The Priest holds the highest status in the People of Israel, thus he is called up to the Torah first, and has first rights in leading the "Zimun" before the Birchat HaMazon. Since he did not participate in the "Goral," or Lottery, which divided the Land of Israel, he is the recipient of certain parts of some of the sacrifices, and of various "Matnot Kehunah," "Obligatory Presents to the Priests,' such as Terumah. The Kohanim are a subset of the Tribe of Levi. Thus, every Kohen is a Levi, but not every Levi is a Kohen.

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"Levi" - (pl. Leviim) - Levites; descendants of Levi, the son of Yaakov. Their task is to assist the Kohanim in matters relating to the Temple. Back in the desert, when the Jewish People carried the Mishkan from place to place, it was the task of the Leviim to carry the various components of the Mishkan, from the boards to the holy vessels from one destination to another. It is also the task of the Leviim to be the choir in the Temple; thus, for example, they would sing the "Psalm (Song of Praise) of the Day" and play the various instruments in the Temple. They were also the gatekeepers of the Temple. Since, like the Kohanim they are not given land in Israel, they are the recipients of "Maaser," one tenth the produce, or income, of each of the other tribes.

After the destruction of the Temple the Jews were sent into exile. The teachers of Torah are called Rabbis {Teachers} and during the 1st Century the Sages {Chazal} in an attempt to prevent Judaism from becoming extinct wrote down the Oral law in the form of the Talmud.

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"CHAZAL"  - an acronym, using "CH," "Z," and "L," where "CH" stands for "Chachameinu," Our Sages, and the "Z" and "L" correspond to the expression "Zichronam Livrocho," "of blessed memory;" this means basically the authoritative opinion of the Talmud.

When we refer to Sages we are referring to Chazal. But there are sages throughout the generations. We have specific names for Rabbis of various generations. The first generation of Sages we call 'Rishon':

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"Rishon"  - (m., pl. "Rishonim"); the "first" or an "early one." In Torah scholarship, the term has taken on the specific meaning of Torah scholars who lived from approximately the eleventh though the fifteenth-sixteenth centuries, who passed along the Talmudic Tradition their earliest members received from the "Geonim" to later generations, and added their own insights to the Talmudic analysis. Some of the great "Rishonim" were RASHI, Rabbi Shlomo Yitzchaki, of France, his grand-children and great grandchildren, the "Baalei Tosafot," the RAMBAM, Rabbi Moshe ben Maimon of twelfth century Spain and later, Egypt, and the RAMBAN, Rabbi Moshe ben Nachman, of thirteenth century Spain and later, Eretz Yisrael, to name but a few.

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"Acharon"  - (m., pl. "Acharonim"); the "last" or a "later one." In Torah scholarship, the term has taken on the specific meaning of a Torah scholar who lived from approximately the sixteenth-seventeenth centuries through the nineteenth century. Some examples are Rabbi Akiva Eiger, the "Chatam Sofer" and the "Chofetz Chayim."

2) Is there any other holy men names I missed and can you explain the difference?

Well in the Chassidic circles we consider our Holy men to be Tzadiks, or righteous people...

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"Tzaddik"  - (pl. "Tzadikkim"); a righteous man (for the female equivalent, see "Tzidkanit") - based on the Hebrew word "Tzedek," or Justice. The Jewish hero is not the swashbuckling warrior, but rather the "Tzaddik," the "mighty warrior" who conquers his "evil inclinations," towards pride, power and oppression, and practices righteousness and humility, and who is, like G-d, always on "the side of the oppressed." ("Kohelet," or Ecclesiastes 3:15) Examples were the three "Avot," the forefathers of the Jewish People, Avraham, Yitzchak and Yaakov, who exemplified what a person can be.

People often compare the Tzadik to the Christian Saint though it is not a position which one is elected to... A person can only be a Tzadik through their actions, and usually if they consider themselves a Tzadik they usually are not such a righteous person.

Chassidus is a 'sect' of Judaism which was started about 300 years ago in the Ukraine. I consider myself a Breslov Chassid :

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"Chassidut" - Movement within Judaism founded by the "Baal Shem Tov" in 1736.  It emphasized prayer, joy and "kabbalah," Jewish Mysticism.   After the debacle of Shabtai Tzvi, the false Messiah who converted to Islam, the Jewish community needed a boost in spirit.  This was provided by Chassidut.  The movement was vigorously opposed by the "Mitnagdim," the Opponents (of Chassidut),  under the leadership of the Vilna Gaon.

3) When King David ruled The Land of Israel (correct me if I'm wrong) was he the supreme ruler and was Israel a Kingdom or a Holy Nation or both?

This is a very complex story. I still have not learned everything about King Davids life. What I do know is that King David lived a very difficult life. His ups and downs in life gave him a perspective which we read whenever we read the Psalms of David.

The story which I have been interested in concerning David is the story about his son Absalom. Absalom was a wicked son who attempted to overthrow his fathers thrown. Despite the fact that his son stabbed him in the back he still mourned when Absalom was killed. It is easy to understand why David could author such intense writings as the Psalms because he knew that Hashem was with him in distress.

http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/463978/jewish/Absaloms-Revolt.htm
http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/463979/jewish/Davids-Humility.htm

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Murder among Brothers

David had a number of sons, of whom four, Amnon, Absalom, Adoniah, and Solomon became conspicuous in the history of Israel.

Amnon, the son of Ahinoam of Jezreel, was David's first-born. His brother Absalom, the son of David's other wife, was famous for his splendid appearance. His long and luxuriant hair was his peculiar pride. Absalom had a sister named Tamar, who was very fair. Once Amnon deeply offended her, which exceedingly enraged Absalom. Between Absalom and his half-brother Amnon there was now kindled a terrible feud which could only be quenched in the life-blood of the offender.

Absalom had large flocks of sheep grazing in Baal-Hazor, near the frontier of Ephraim: at the time of the sheep-shearing, he invited all his brothers to the rural feast, and Amnon went among the rest. When Amnon's heart was merry with wine, the servants of Absalom slew him on a predetermined sign from their master. A general panic seized the guests. No one thought of retaliation for the bloody deed of Absalom. All sprang upon their mules and fled. Absalom, meanwhile, had fled to his mother's family in Geshur, where he dwelt for three years.

At last Absalom was, by Joab's intercession, permitted to return to Jerusalem, but for two years he was not permitted to see his father. David could not forgive him for his cruel deed of fratricide.

Absalom now hated his father and designed schemes for dethroning him and wresting the kingdom from him. The false and faithless son began, ostensibly, to seek his father's forgiveness, as otherwise he could not hope to succeed in his plans. After repeated intercession by Joab, David finally permitted his son to appear before him.

Absalom's Revolt Succeeds

Absalom considered himself the heir to the throne, for now that Amnon was dead, he was the next in line of succession. David, however, had been prophetically informed that his young son Solomon, the son of Bathsheba, would succeed him. Absalom must have suspected this from his father's attitude, and he secretly prepared a revolt. When his plans had matured, he induced the king to allow him to go to Hebron for the fulfillment of a vow which he professed to have made while living in Geshur. He went southward with two hundred unsuspecting followers. In Hebron he sounded the trumpet-call. Alas! the ungrateful people readily forgot the great king who had been anointed at that very place, and who had gloriously reigned over them for 37 years, and they came flocking to the standard of Absalom. Even Ahitophel the Gilonite, David's wise counsellor, declared for his son and gave to the rebellion the weight of his name and experience.

...

Insult to Injury

The king passed on and arrived at Bahurim, on the borders of the land of Benjamin. As the procession wound along the hill side, with the deep valley between them and the opposite hill, there came forth from his house Shimei of the family of Saul. The ravine separated him from the king, He gave vent to his burning hatred of the unhappy monarch; in his rage he cast stones at him and at his followers, heaping curse upon curse. The anger of Abishai, David's loyal general, was aroused, and he begged David's permission to go over and kill Shimei. But David would not permit him or anyone else to take up his cause saying, "Behold, my son seeks my life; how much more now may this Benjaminite do it? Let him alone and let him curse, for G-d has bidden him. It may be that G-d will look upon my afflictions and will requite me good for his cursing this day." So they passed onward on their side of the hill, while on the other side walked Shimei, throwing stones as before and casting dust and uttering loud imprecations. Sad and tired, the king and his followers rested at last after their weary and mournful day.

Absalom in Jerusalem

Meanwhile Absalom and his followers, among them his counselor Ahitophel, entered Jerusalem. Hushai was conspicuous among the men who welcomed Absalom into the city. Professing the deepest devotion to Absalom, Hushai gained his full confidence. A council of war was held, and Ahitophel proposed that an army of twelve thousand men should instantly be sent, under his leadership, in pursuit of David. Hushai heard with dismay this advice, which might have proved fatal to his royal master. Pretending to have nothing but Absalom's safety at heart, Hushai persuaded him to bide his time until his aging father would resign himself to his fate and abdicate in favor of his son. Pointing out the uncertainty of an open clash with David's men, Hushai bade Absalom remember that King David was still a powerful man, that his heart was as the heart of a lion, that he was surrounded by valiant followers, and that to attack him might mean the destruction of Absalom's army. If Absalom was determined to fight it out with his father, then he should at least recruit a huge army in order to be certain of victory. This counsel was approved of by Absalom, in preference to that of Ahitophel.

Without losing any time, Hushai at once sent two secret messengers to King David, advising him to continue his journey without delay. As the first rays of the morning sun lighted up the banks of the Jordan, the king and his sorrowing followers passed safely over the river and traveled on to Mahanaim.

News of David's escape reached Ahitophel. He realized that Divine Providence was now favoring David and that his restoration to the throne could not be long delayed. Rather than face a victorious David again, Ahitophel hastily returned home and put his house in order, then he hanged himself.

-- TO BE CONTINUED --
« Last Edit: February 08, 2010, 11:54:33 PM by muman613 »
And you shall call out and say before the Lord, your God, "An Aramean [sought to] destroy my forefather, and he went down to Egypt and sojourned there with a small number of people, and there, he became a great, mighty, and numerous nation.
Devarim/Ki Tavo 26:5

Offline YimachShemotoIslam

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #108 on: February 08, 2010, 08:14:58 PM »
Muman, I have a couple questions for you. Do you consider the Druze, Muslim or not? And how many of them support Israel?


« Last Edit: February 08, 2010, 08:22:18 PM by YimachShemotoIslam »
Dan - Stay calm and be brave in order to judge correctly and make the right decision

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #109 on: February 08, 2010, 11:30:56 PM »
Muman, I have a couple questions for you. Do you consider the Druze, Muslim or not? And how many of them support Israel?


YimachShemotoIslam, I have no idea in this world what Druze are. Baruch Hashem that I dont know. From what I remember the Druze are considered a Christian Arab people. I do work with an Egyptian Christian at work and he is a good man. As for their support for Israel I am not sure... I live in California and only hear about Druze from IsraelNationalNews...

This is some bad information :

http://www.ou.org/torah/tt/5768/vayishlach68/specialfeatures.htm

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The Pogrom of Peki'in

The Druze community of Israel consists of 120,000 members and resides mainly in the Carmel, Galilee and Golan Heights. Since 1957 the Druze have been drafted to the IDF. Until today over 300 have been killed in active duty. It is therefore no wonder that PM Ehud Olmert announced that the recent events in the village of Peki'in were none other than crime related and not of national magnitude. No police officer or government official wants to think that the Druze-Israeli relations are dwindling.

In fact if one's knowledge of the recent events of Peki'in is based solely on Police and media reports, then he has a very faded and naive version of the situation.

What are Jews doing in a Druze village you ask?

Until these recent events, Ancient Peki'in was home to seven Jewish families who arrived in recent years in support of Margalit Zinaty, the last living member of the Zinaty family which has resided in Peki'in for the last 2000 years. Let it be understood that the village of Peki'in is not just a case of Jewish people trying to settle in an Arab village, but a right to a claim of 2000 years of Jewish settlement and rich history tracing back to the Second Beit Hamikdash. One of the most prominent places visited by tourists to Peki'in is the ancient Jewish synagogue, under the responsibility of Miss Zinaty herself. Peki'in's greatest claim to fame however is the Cave of Rabbi Shimon Bar Yochai, located mere footsteps away from the edge of the village.

Less than five years ago, the Zigelman family moved to Peki'in, and soon to follow were the other six families. Although the Jewish-Druze relationship in Peki'in was fairly calm and decent, the Jews of Peki'in were not surprised by the recent events that unfolded. The tranquil Jewish-Druze relationship has in the last two years become passe amongst the Druze youth of the village. Just one month ago in Peki'in, a Druze teenager deliberately drove his ATV buggy at high speeds towards a group of Jewish teenagers in attempt to run them over. This is only one example of the many recent Jewish-Druze teenage confrontations.

On Motzei Shabbat, October 13, '07, the night of Id-El-Fitar, symbolizing the end of the Islamic Ramadan, a car belonging to the Zigelman family was set ablaze. Although a report was filed with the police, the media spoke not a word of the incident. The following Sunday, October 21st, a hand grenade was thrown into a Jewish home. Baruch Hashem no one was injured. The atmosphere in Peki'in became tense. Rumors of incitement against the Jews of the village began to stir. Three days later, Wednesday October 24th, the Druze youth of Peki'in raided New Peki'in, a close-by Jewish settlement, in attempt to vandalize and remove a Jewish owned cellular antenna. They returned to Old Peki'in in an uproar of howls and chants, in announcement of their success and victory.

The Jews of Peki'in instantly new that they were the next targets. They were right. Around midnight, another hand grenade was thrown into the home of the Zalicha family. Yinon, the father of the Zalicha household reports that the grenade exploded on the roof collapsing part of the ceiling just inches from where he was standing. Even this still did not interest the media.

The following Motzei Shabbat, Oct. 27th, a group of Druze teenagers returned to the home of the owner of the cellular antenna, under repair from their previous riots, killed all his chickens and torched his chicken coop. They then continued on to torch a security vehicle, vandalize several Police vehicles, and steal their valuable communication equipment.

At 2:00am yet another grenade was thrown at neighbors of the Zalicha family, exploding their household propane tanks. Miraculously no one was hurt. Nearing the break of dawn, after several policemen were injured, the Druze head of the City Counsel announced over the village speaker system, "Kol Hakavod! You are our pride!"

The next Monday, October 29th, a Police car patrolling the area was stoned. The Police began to organize themselves for entry into Peki'in. Upon realization that the Druze planned to ambush them upon entry, the Police told the Jewish families that they could not respond to their calls for help.

At 2:30am, later that same night, another hand grenade was thrown into the Zigelman house- hold. Yet again, miraculously no one was injured.

In response to the continued Druze rioting and extreme violence, smashing windows of Jewish cars and homes, the Police finally decided to enter the village. In the intense shootout between the Police and the Druze, a female Police officer was taken hostage. The Druze freed her only in exchange for their arrested accomplices.

After the Police left the village at 6:15am, the Druze stormed Jewish cars yet again. The Zigelman family managed to escape in a friend's car that they had coincidently borrowed that day. Less than fifteen minutes later, the Druze ransacked their home and set it ablaze, torching all that the Zigelman's possessed.

As you can see, the reality of the frightening events that unfolded in Peki'in on the dates of October 13th through the 29th, and the reports and claims of the Police Department and Government are two very different things.

The unfortunate Jewish families of Peki'in are in a desperate situation. They currently cannot return to their homes, or what's left of them, for that matter. Most have lost valuable possessions and in the case of the Zigelmans, all their possessions.

For more information and/or for donation details to help ease the pain of the families of Peki'in, please call Merav at 052-810-9176 or email [email protected]
And you shall call out and say before the Lord, your God, "An Aramean [sought to] destroy my forefather, and he went down to Egypt and sojourned there with a small number of people, and there, he became a great, mighty, and numerous nation.
Devarim/Ki Tavo 26:5

Offline muman613

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #110 on: February 09, 2010, 04:13:02 AM »
Shalom Muman, very interesting reading but still trying to understand.

1) What's the difference between Sages, Priest's & Rabbis?
2) Is there any other holy men names I missed and can you explain the difference?
3) When King David ruled The Land of Israel (correct me if I'm wrong) was he the supreme ruler and was Israel a Kingdom or a Holy Nation or both?
4) Did The Jewish People ever have A Holy One to rule over all of Israel like (bad example The Catholic Pope) and if so what was he referred to?
5) Did Judas Judas Maccabeus ever become King of Israel? If not, why and what was he referred to?
6) Was The Land Gd gave to The Israelites Judah, Samaria and Israel all three separate regions, who united them as one and how was this done?

It is early in the morning here and Im still up... Thought I might as well answer #4 while I am up...

4) Did The Jewish People ever have A Holy One to rule over all of Israel like (bad example The Catholic Pope) and if so what was he referred to?

Well, the closest thing I can think of would be what we call the Kohain Gadol or the High Priest {Large/Great Priest}. This 'Big Kahuna' was responsible for the most sacred of rituals in the Torah. There is only one person who can enter the Holy of Holies in the Holy Temple, the place where the Aaron HaKodesh {The Holy Ark of the Covenant}. On Yom Kippur this ritual would occur where the priest would go in and if he was not pure or had impure thoughts, this priest can die on the spot.

The Kohain Gadol must be totally devoid of any defects, meaning that their skin, their hair, their eyes, their mouths, everything must be perfectly formed. A Kohain who has a Mumm is not permitted to perform the service.

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Leviticus Chapter 21

17. Speak to Aaron, saying: Any man among your offspring throughout their generations who has a defect, shall not come near to offer up his G-d's food.
18. For any man who has a defect should not approach: A blind man or a lame one, or one with a sunken nose or with mismatching limbs;
19. or a man who has a broken leg or a broken arm;
20. or one with long eyebrows, or a cataract, or a commingling in his eye; dry lesions or weeping sores, or one with crushed testicles
21. Any man among Aaron the kohen's offspring who has a defect shall not draw near to offer up the Lord's fire offerings. There is a defect in him; he shall not draw near to offer up his G-d's food.
22. His G-d's food from the most holy and from the holy ones, he may eat.

As you can see any Kohen who has a defect is forbidden to make offerings to Hashem.

Lets see what AskMoses says that the Kohen Gadols job was:

http://www.askmoses.com/en/article/591,41053/What-were-the-duties-of-the-Kohen-Gadol.html

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What were the duties of the Kohen Gadol?

The Kohen Gadol was required to bring a special bread sacrifice every day, and only the Kohen Gadol was allowed to perform the sacred Yom Kippur service. Additionally, the Kohen Gadol had first rights to the daily lighting of the menorah, and the daily burning of the incense; if he wished to do these services, or any other service, his wish was respected.

He would wear four “royal” garments in addition to the standard four which were worn by all Kohanim. The Kohen Gadol would also hand a Torah scroll to the king to read at the octennial rally known as Hakhel (pronounced HAK-hel).

The Kohen Gadol was also commanded to wed a virgin, unlike his priestly brothers who are allowed to marry widows.

Because of his heightened status, the Kohen Gadol dedicated his life to the service of G-d. He was to spend his days on the Temple grounds, where he was provided with private chambers, serving as a living symbol of total dedication to the most spiritual things in life. He lived in Jerusalem and would go home every night.


Due to the special holiness which the Kohanim possess, they are forbidden from coming in contact with a corpse or grave. One who comes in contact with a corpse or grave contracts a spiritual impurity which lasts for at least seven days, and can only be removed through the ashes of the Red Heifer. The exception to this rule is if a member of the Kohen's immediate family passes away. In this case, out of respect for the family-member, the Kohen is obligated to attend the funeral and pay his final respects - despite the impurity which this entails.

The Kohen Gadol, who is even holier than the average Kohen, can't attend a funeral, even if it is his own next of kin.

The only time a Kohen Gadol may be involved with a corpse, is if he encounters a Mes Mitzvah (a corpse that is strewn on the road, and no one else is in the vicinity to give it a proper burial). This is because the dignity of the Jewish body supercedes all other considerations.

http://www.ou.org/chagim/yomkippur/ykavodah.htm

Here it discusses the Yom Kippur avodah...

http://www.chabad.org/parshah/article_cdo/aid/3101/jewish/Yom-Kippur-Torah-Readings.htm

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Yom Kippur Torah Readings
Leviticus 16:1-34; 18:1-30

The Torah reading for Yom Kippur morning describes the service performed on this day by the Kohen Gadol (high priest) in the Holy Temple in Jerusalem.

A special feature of the Yom Kippur service was the casting of lots over two he-goats -- equal in age, size and appearance -- to determine which shall be offered to G-d in the Holy Temple, and which shall be dispatched to carry off the sins of Israel to the wilderness.

The climax of the service was when the Kohen Gadol entered the innermost chamber in the Temple, the "Holy of Holies." Wearing special garments of pure white linen, the Kohen Gadol would enter the sacred place with a pan of burning coals in his right hand, and a ladle containing an exact handful of ketoret in his left. Inside the Holy of Holies, he would place the ketoret over the coals, wait for the room to fill with its aromatic smoke, and hastily retreat from the holy place.

"This shall be an everlasting statute for you," the Torah reading concludes. "...For on this day He will forgive you, to purify you, that you be cleansed from all your sins before G-d... once a year."


During the afternoon Minchah service, we read chapter 18 of Leviticus, which details the prohibitions against incest and other deviant sexual behaviors. The Torah reading is followed by a haftorah (reading from the Prophets) which tells the story of Jonah -- the prophet who was sent to prophesy the destruction of the sinful city of Ninveh, ran away from G-d, was swallowed by a fish, and learned the power of prayer and repentance to evoke G-d's mercy and annul the harshest decrees.
« Last Edit: February 09, 2010, 04:21:05 AM by muman613 »
And you shall call out and say before the Lord, your God, "An Aramean [sought to] destroy my forefather, and he went down to Egypt and sojourned there with a small number of people, and there, he became a great, mighty, and numerous nation.
Devarim/Ki Tavo 26:5

Offline Spectator

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #111 on: February 09, 2010, 04:22:44 AM »
From what I remember the Druze are considered a Christian Arab people.

Muman, the Druze are indeed Arabs but they are not Christian. They follow some offshoot of Islam. I guess they are considered heretics by "conventional" Muslims.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Druze

Both Druzes and Arab Christians live in upper Galilee and sometimes there are conflicts between them.
Do not put your trust in princes, nor in a son of man, in whom there is no help (Psalms 146:3)

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #112 on: February 10, 2010, 07:48:09 AM »
Do you know who is Avigdor Liberman? And if you do, please tell me what you think of him.

Thanks in advance.
Eddie

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #113 on: February 10, 2010, 03:16:21 PM »
Dear Muman, why do Arab Christians call God Allah?

Dan - Stay calm and be brave in order to judge correctly and make the right decision

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #114 on: February 23, 2010, 10:55:20 AM »
Dear Muman, why do Arab Christians call G-d Allah?



Shalom YimachShemotoIslam,

Well this is an interesting question. I just learned the answer a couple of weeks ago here at JTF. I did not accept the answer initially because for the longest time I could not understand what they meant, and my rage at Islam will never cease. I have always believed that Allah was not a name of Hashem because it seems so clear that Islam is a perverted religion and so many ideas they have stand against what Torah teaches. But after I have thought about it in light of how languages developed in the middle east over the centuries it seems that Allah may actually be an arabicized {sp?} version of one of the Hebrew names of G-d.

In Hebrew our name for G-d, the eternal judge and master of nature, is Elokim. This name is often just shortened to El and it is used in the names of Angels, such as Micha-el, Gabri-el, and Raphi-el, and the word Elokim is used for Judges and leaders.

http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/638043/jewish/Why-is-Gd-Called-Elokim.htm

I was told that Allah is an arabized version of El {as in Ehl-Ah}.

I do not know if this is the truth but according to my recent investigation this may be the case.

Quote
Question

I understand that the Tetragrammaton is the G‑d's true name. So why is G‑d also referred to in the Torah as "Elokim"? Isn't one name enough?

Response

When Abraham started off, people understood that there is one original G‑d who is the essence of being. This is what we refer to with the four-letter name, the Tetragrammaton, whose code name in Kabbalah is "Havaya." That name can only be written in singular form. In fact, it is basically a conjugation of the verb "to be."

They knew of this concept of Havaya, but they considered it far too lofty an idea, seemingly inaccessible and irrelevant to their lives. Instead, they connected to the many forces of nature. They called these "Elokim"—meaning, "mighty forces."

Abraham came along and said, "You guys got it all wrong. Havaya is Elokim! It's all one! He is the essence of being and He is all the forces of nature in one big package!"

That's why, as the Biblical commentator Baal HaTurim points out, the Hebrew letters in the name Elokim have the same gematria (numerical value) as "haTeva"—which means the natural order.

For more on the relation of these two names of G‑d, see Shaar HaYichud V'ha-Emunah by Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi. You can find that here.
« Last Edit: February 23, 2010, 11:05:13 AM by muman613 »
And you shall call out and say before the Lord, your God, "An Aramean [sought to] destroy my forefather, and he went down to Egypt and sojourned there with a small number of people, and there, he became a great, mighty, and numerous nation.
Devarim/Ki Tavo 26:5

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #115 on: February 23, 2010, 01:21:29 PM »
can you explain me what is Tzelem Elokim and the concept of I am that I Am?

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #116 on: February 24, 2010, 12:44:27 AM »
can you explain me what is Tzelem Elokim and the concept of I am that I Am?

Shalom HZ,

You ask some very 'deep' questions of me.  Both of those questions do not have an easy answer.

I also cannot fully explain to you the deeper aspects of those questions because, as I think you are aware, we are not supposed to teach non-Jews the Torah. But I will attempt to give an adequate answer to these very challenging questions.

The definition of the Hebrew words 'Tzelem Elokim' means 'The image of G-d'. Now I realize those words may be confusing because one of the basic tenets of Judaism is the fact that Hashem has no image, no body, nor any corporal existence. If Hashem has no body nor any way of representation in the physical world then what is meant by the image of G-d?

There are two aspects to understand when contemplating this. First is the belief that Hashem breathed life into Adam, the first human being, and as a result man has the spirit of Hashem within him. A man is composed of two, often conflicting, traits. We call these the 'Animal Soul' and the 'Spiritual Soul'. We are a composite of these two elements and thusly we represent Hashems 'image' in the physical world {Olam Hazeh}. Our animal souls are responsible for our baser desires such as eating, having pleasure, breathing and bodily functions, lusts and cravings. All animal life, we believe, contains this animal soul. The animal soul also is the origin of emotions such as anger and hatred, fear and enjoyment, happiness and sadness.

Another interesting aspect is the idea that all of mankind is made in Hashems image, and we are commanded not to destroy Hashems name, one of the main reasons we do not write his proper names on the internet {in case someone should print a copy and destroy or erase the name}. The name 'Elokim' as I stated above is the name of Hashem which represents Nature and Judgment.

This excerpt from the site http://www.neveh.org/ciner/parsha58/yisro.html explains this idea in essence:

Quote
The first five commandments apply to the relationship between man and G-d and the second five commandments apply to the relationship between man and man. The Kli Yakar explains that these groups align with one another. The first commandment aligns with the sixth, the second with the seventh, and so on. The first commandment, "Anochi Hashem Elokecha (20:2)" - I am Hashem your G-d - aligns with "lo sirtzoch" - thou shalt not murder.

"If one spills a person's blood, then his blood must be spilt because in the 'tzelem Elokim' - in the form of Elokim - man was made (Breishis 9:6)." The Mishna in Avos (3:14) teaches that Hashem showed us a special love by informing us that we were created in this 'tzelem Elokim'. When did this occur? When the heavens resonated with the words "Lo sirtzoch!" The value of a human being! A walking 'embodiment' of the Creator Himself! Anochi Hashem! Lo sirtzoch!

This, Rav Sher writes, must guide us in our dealings with ourselves, with others and with Hashem. Hillel took leave from his students explaining that he had to go perform a mitzvah. Their curiosity aroused, they followed him and watched him enter a bath house. Upon leaving the bath house he explained this mitzvah to his students. A statue of the king is constantly cleaned and shined. By doing so they honor their king. We who were created in the 'tzelem Elokim' have an even greater obligation to clean and shine this form. To keep and present ourselves properly. Lo sirtzoch! Don't sell yourself short! Recognize who you are.

When we deal with others we must be cognizant of who we are dealing with. The Talmud (Sanhedrin 58B) states that if one slaps the face of a Yisroel it's like slapping the face of the Shechinah (Divine Presence). The medrash warns us against rationalizing that if you're in an embarrassing situation you can bring others down with you. Know who you are humiliating! In the 'tzelem Elokim' man was made! Lo sirtzoch! Don't step on other's toes! Recognize the value of others.

If we were formed in the 'tzelem Elokim' then we must realize our capacity to be like Him. As He is compassionate, so too we must be compassionate. Our very selves and our actions must reflect this capacity. Lo sirtzoch! Don't murder that essential part of you! Recognize what you can become.

It applies to every moment of our days, to every facet of our lives... lo sirtzoch.

Now the other name which you ask me about is known as the unpronounced name. As it is written in the Torah we do not pronounce it, but use another name which represents Hashems Lordship. You suggest one of the translations which most read as "I am what I am" but I have learned that this translation is imprecise. The Rabbis teach that translation from Hebrew to english is often difficult because Hebrew words have more 'connotation' and 'deeper meanings' than the words mean in English {and they also convey meaning through gematria/numeric representation}. The truer translation is "I am what I will be" which conveys Hashems infinite and eternal nature. Hashem doesn't change with time, he existed before time, he exists always, and he will exist after time ceases to exist.

I will provide a link which explains this as best we can here: http://vbm-torah.org/archive/13/02middot.htm

Quote
The Thirteen Divine Attributes of Mercy
By Rav Ezra Bick
Shiur #2: “Hashem, Hashem”


            In our introductory shiur, we established that underlying the recitation of the thirteen middot rachamim is the concept that the Shekhina’s presence in the world depends upon human recognition of its presence.  Hence, the presence of the Shekhina’s attribute of mercy depends upon the reading of the divine Names of mercy by the servants of G-d.  Chazal have transmitted to us a tradition that there are thirteen attributes of mercy, and that we should read all thirteen and thereby bring about their manifestation in the world.  It thus behooves us to begin trying to understand the precise meaning of each of these attributes.

            The first attribute – or the first divine Name – is that of Havaya (Y-H-V-H), which is known as the Shem Ha-meforash.  The verse that lists the thirteen attributes begins “Hashem, Hashem,” and the Rishonim debate the question of whether we count these two words as two attributes, a single attribute[1], or no attributes.[2]  Our discussion here will follow the position taken by Rabbenu Tam, which is the most commonly accepted view, on the basis of the Gemara’s comment in Masekhet Rosh Ha-shana (17b).  Tosefot present Rabbenu Tam’s view as follows:

Rabbenu Tam says that the first two Names are two attributes, as stated here [in the Gemara], “I am HaShem before one sins, having compassion on him, and I have compassion after one sins if he repents.”  “Hashem” as an attribute of mercy differs from Elokim, which refers to the attribute of justice.

            The Talmudic passage which Rabbenu Tam cites is the direct continuation of Rabbi Yochanan’s comment which we discussed in our previous installment:

This teaches that the Almighty wrapped Himself as a sheli’ach tzibur [leader of the public prayer service] and showed Moshe the prayer service.  He said to him, “Any time Israel sins, they shall perform this service before Me and I shall forgive them.  Hashem, Hashem – I am He before a person sins, and I am He after a person sins and repents.

Tosefot add a brief explanation of the Gemara’s comment, clarifying that the actual name of Havaya signifies the attribute of mercy, as opposed to Elokim, which refers to the attribute of strict justice.

            Clearly, one could have explained the Gemara’s comment to mean that G-d promises to continue showing compassion even after the sin, just as He treats one compassionately before he sins.  “I am G-d – I have not changed.”  Rabbenu Tam, however, understood that the Gemara speaks here of two separate attributes, a reading that leaves us with two questions.  How does the divine Name of Havaya express an ”attribute of mercy,” and, secondly, why does the continued presence of this Name despite a person’s sin constitute a separate attribute, something different from its manifestation prior to sin?  If the persistence of this attribute after sin constitutes an independent attribute, then we should seemingly add a second attribute to all the other middot, as well; thus, for example, G-d is rachum, “compassionate,” before sin and after sin, and so on.  Apparently, the fact that only the attribute of Havaya is repeated led Rabbenu Tam to conclude that specifically with regard to this attribute, its restoration through the performance of teshuva reflects a new, independent attribute, even if it is expressed with the same term.  One Name – but two attributes.  This is true only with regard to the Name of Havaya, and thus our understanding of the difference between the two attributes depends upon how we understand the meaning of the attribute represented by this divine Name.

            The explanation I would like to present here is based upon an article by Rav Yitzchak Hutner zt”l in Pachad Yitzchak (Rosh Ha-shana).

            The simple meaning of the divine Name of Havaya (literally, existence) relates to the notion that G-d gives existence to the entire universe; all of existence comes from Him.  This is true not only in the sense of a historical creation, but also in the sense presented by the Rambam in the beginning of Hilkhot Yesodei Ha-Torah, namely, that the very concept of existence is possible only on the basis of the will and power of G-d.  There is nothing besides Him; there is nothing whose existence is possible without the will of G-d.

            “Olam chesed yibaneh” (“The world is built through kindness” – Tehillim 89:3).  The world’s creation was an act of pure kindness.  What does this mean?  Once the world came into existence, G-d relates to it either with compassion or with judgment.  Once the world exists, once actions were performed and certain situations arose, there is the possibility of judgment in response to that which occurred in the world.  “Judgment” means that which a person deserves – reward or punishment.  G-d acts in response to a situation, and a system of justice dictates that response.  G-d repays each person in accordance with his conduct; a wicked man is repaid with evil.  But before the world’s creation, before any situation arose, there could be no such thing as a justified response, for there was not as yet any situation that could justify anything.  The state of absolute non-existence does not warrant or justify any response.  Hence, the world’s creation cannot be a reward or response that the world deserved due to its prior state, because it had no prior state.

Hashem asked the Jewish people, in last weeks Torah reading, to build a sanctuary and he will dwell amongst us. The Rabbis teach us that the sanctuary he will dwell in is within us, if we make a place for him. May we merit to see Moshiach come and the rebuilding of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem.

Amen
« Last Edit: February 24, 2010, 01:20:39 AM by muman613 »
And you shall call out and say before the Lord, your God, "An Aramean [sought to] destroy my forefather, and he went down to Egypt and sojourned there with a small number of people, and there, he became a great, mighty, and numerous nation.
Devarim/Ki Tavo 26:5

Offline muman613

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #117 on: February 24, 2010, 01:28:53 AM »
This is very interesting stuff about when Hashem told the name to Moses:

http://www.askmoses.com/en/article/419,2107704/Free-to-Be-What-I-Will-Be.html#articlepage
Quote
It is in this sense that Moses' statement - "They will say to me, 'What is His name?'" -should be understood.

However, even if we take this verse literally, and assume that Israel will ask for the name of G-d, not the meaning of the name, this question can still be answered. We can assume that Moses anticipated that Israel will ask the "Exodus name of G-d". Moses anticipated as follows: Israel will say to me, "Aha, so you claim to be the Savior of Israel, who has come to redeem us. If you want us to believe you, first tell us the name of G-d by which He will bring about the Exodus. Surely, if you are the true Savior, you must know this name."

By "name of G-d" Israel meant the "essential order of Exodus". There is a name of G-d related to the order of all G-d's actions, including the order of Exodus. It would surely be appropriate for Moses to know this name of Exodus, if he is the true Savior of Israel.

This interpretation is borne out by the answer that G-d gave to Moses, as it is explained in the first chapter of Tractate Berachot.5 "Eh-yeh Asher Eh-yeh ", [which literally means "I will be what I will be" and is often translated "What will be, will be"]. The Holy One said to Moses, "Say to Israel, I will be with you [to redeem you] in this subjugation (corresponding to the first), and I will be with you in the subjugation of the future (corresponding to the name 'Asher Eh-yeh').

Said Moses: "Master of the world, it is enough to mention one trouble at a time. Said the Holy One: "You are right. Say to Israel, 'Eh-yeh has sent me to you'."

We thus see that we are not here concerned with finding out the regular name of G-d - everybody knew that name. Rather we are concerned with the special name of Exodus - which he used to redeem Israel out of their subjugation. This special name was not known to them.

Eh-yeh is the name of Exodus for the following reason: Eh-yeh means ultimate and total existence. Any existent being can say with certainty "I am", and "I was". However, except for G-d, no existent being can say with certainty, "I will be".

"Eh-yeh", meaning "I will be", thus means total existence, which transcends the partial existence of all other beings. Furthermore, since the name Eh-yeh is in the first person ("I will be" rather than "He will be") it means "I will be known to you as the One who exists totally, for I will convey existence to you also." Hence, the name Eh-yeh contains the order of Exodus, that is, "removing you from a nonexistent state, and granting you true and independent existence."

However, in addition to the name Eh-yeh, the name Havayah is also a name of Exodus, as the verse states: "I will be [in Hebrew, "Eh-yeh") what I will be (Asher Eheyeh), so say to the children of Israel, Eh-yeh has sent me to you."

G-d said further to Moses, So say to the children of Israel, Havayah the G-d of your fathers, the G-d of Abraham, the G-d of Isaac and the G-d of Jacob, has sent me to you, this is My name forever, and this is My memorial from generation to generation.6
And you shall call out and say before the Lord, your God, "An Aramean [sought to] destroy my forefather, and he went down to Egypt and sojourned there with a small number of people, and there, he became a great, mighty, and numerous nation.
Devarim/Ki Tavo 26:5

Offline YimachShemotoIslam

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #118 on: February 24, 2010, 03:25:14 PM »
This is very interesting stuff about when Hashem told the name to Moses:

http://www.askmoses.com/en/article/419,2107704/Free-to-Be-What-I-Will-Be.html#articlepage
Quote
It is in this sense that Moses' statement - "They will say to me, 'What is His name?'" -should be understood.

However, even if we take this verse literally, and assume that Israel will ask for the name of G-d, not the meaning of the name, this question can still be answered. We can assume that Moses anticipated that Israel will ask the "Exodus name of G-d". Moses anticipated as follows: Israel will say to me, "Aha, so you claim to be the Savior of Israel, who has come to redeem us. If you want us to believe you, first tell us the name of G-d by which He will bring about the Exodus. Surely, if you are the true Savior, you must know this name."

By "name of G-d" Israel meant the "essential order of Exodus". There is a name of G-d related to the order of all G-d's actions, including the order of Exodus. It would surely be appropriate for Moses to know this name of Exodus, if he is the true Savior of Israel.

This interpretation is borne out by the answer that G-d gave to Moses, as it is explained in the first chapter of Tractate Berachot.5 "Eh-yeh Asher Eh-yeh ", [which literally means "I will be what I will be" and is often translated "What will be, will be"]. The Holy One said to Moses, "Say to Israel, I will be with you [to redeem you] in this subjugation (corresponding to the first), and I will be with you in the subjugation of the future (corresponding to the name 'Asher Eh-yeh').

Said Moses: "Master of the world, it is enough to mention one trouble at a time. Said the Holy One: "You are right. Say to Israel, 'Eh-yeh has sent me to you'."

We thus see that we are not here concerned with finding out the regular name of G-d - everybody knew that name. Rather we are concerned with the special name of Exodus - which he used to redeem Israel out of their subjugation. This special name was not known to them.

Eh-yeh is the name of Exodus for the following reason: Eh-yeh means ultimate and total existence. Any existent being can say with certainty "I am", and "I was". However, except for G-d, no existent being can say with certainty, "I will be".

"Eh-yeh", meaning "I will be", thus means total existence, which transcends the partial existence of all other beings. Furthermore, since the name Eh-yeh is in the first person ("I will be" rather than "He will be") it means "I will be known to you as the One who exists totally, for I will convey existence to you also." Hence, the name Eh-yeh contains the order of Exodus, that is, "removing you from a nonexistent state, and granting you true and independent existence."

However, in addition to the name Eh-yeh, the name Havayah is also a name of Exodus, as the verse states: "I will be [in Hebrew, "Eh-yeh") what I will be (Asher Eheyeh), so say to the children of Israel, Eh-yeh has sent me to you."

G-d said further to Moses, So say to the children of Israel, Havayah the G-d of your fathers, the G-d of Abraham, the G-d of Isaac and the G-d of Jacob, has sent me to you, this is My name forever, and this is My memorial from generation to generation.6

Dear Muman, if you wanted to live in Israel, where would you live?

Dan - Stay calm and be brave in order to judge correctly and make the right decision

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #119 on: February 24, 2010, 03:56:52 PM »
<snip>

Dear Muman, if you wanted to live in Israel, where would you live?


Shalom YemachShemotoIslam,

I have my heart set on settling in Tzfat one of these days. It is a north Israel city which has a lot of history with the Chassidic and Kabbalistic Jews. It also has a vibrant artist and musician scene and I hear that it is very nice there...

http://ilovetorah.com/safed.htm
http://ilovetorah.com/tzaddikim.htm
http://ilovetorah.com/views.htm
http://ilovetorah.com/breslov/tsfat/
http://www.nachalnovea.com/KiryatBreslev/Shul/shul.htm
« Last Edit: February 24, 2010, 04:03:11 PM by muman613 »
And you shall call out and say before the Lord, your God, "An Aramean [sought to] destroy my forefather, and he went down to Egypt and sojourned there with a small number of people, and there, he became a great, mighty, and numerous nation.
Devarim/Ki Tavo 26:5

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #120 on: February 24, 2010, 07:12:59 PM »
Dear Muman, will there be a third war in Lebanon?

Dan - Stay calm and be brave in order to judge correctly and make the right decision

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #121 on: February 24, 2010, 07:24:03 PM »
Dear Muman, will there be a third war in Lebanon?


I am not a prophet and I cannot foretell the future... But if I were a betting man I would think that the odds are pretty good that there will be another conflict with Lebanon.

Apparently my favorite city, Tzfat, was the target of 1000s of missiles from Lebanon... Read this story from Aish.com: http://www.aish.com/jw/id/48924907.html

Quote
What kind of damage would you expect from 3,870 missiles?
Excerpted from "The Miracles of the Lebanon War" by Miyanei Hayeshua.

Attack on Tzfat

The first burst of missiles on Tzfat fell in the commercial center of the city, hitting the Tzalil Center which has many stories and offices. It was 2:40 in the afternoon, an hour when the city is teeming with people.

Although other towns along the border had been previously shot at, Tzfat residents didn't believe missiles could reach them. Tzfat had been outside of range for many years. Then, without any prior warning, missiles fell in the heart of the commercial center.

Missiles usually blow up when they hit something hard. Their immense speed results in the explosion and momentum forcing the missile's propelling charge into a hole created by the explosion. For instance, when it hits a house, the missile's entire destructive charge penetrates the house and explodes into thousands of pieces.

In the first attack on Tzfat, the first missile fell on the roof of a shopping mall, making a direct hit on the large air conditioning unit positioned there. It was a relatively new building and the air conditioner set up on the roof was a huge device made of metal and tin. It was hard enough to cause the missile to explode. It shattered the air conditioner with ear-piercing noise. But not one person was injured.

A Tzfat resident relates: "We knew that a war was going on and we knew that terrorists had shot missiles on the army base in Meron the night before. Despite this, we didn't believe that missiles could fall on Tzfat. Even when we heard the first missile falling, it still didn't register. Add to this the fact that during the first time it fell, you are standing helplessly. You can't stop the missiles, you don't know what to do, where to flee, which place is protected and what else! Can a missile pulverize an entire building? Perhaps you should flee the building? Maybe you should hide inside it instead? Maybe you should go down to the shelter? Where is it? Does this building even have a shelter? These were the questions that reeled through the minds of each one of us. We understood only too soon that the next missiles might wound us, only that this realization couldn't keep up with the speed of the missiles that fell one after the other, hitting Tzfat 's commercial center time and again."

Seconds later the second missile made another direct hit on the roof of a building filled with visitors... but didn't penetrate.

I met Yaakov Shitreet, the engineer who had built the shopping mall, a few days later. I praised him for the roof he had cast for the building which was strong enough to withstand the powerful concussion of the missile.

He stared at me, laughed, and said I was making a serious mistake. This roof was made of plain blocks and bricks, but it had one strong beam in it. Because it had to support the entire ceiling, the beam was made particularly durable with reinforced cement and iron reinforcements.

The missile had hit the beam and couldn't penetrate. Its fragments scattered all around and shattered the windows of the building, but didn't cause any loss in life.
And you shall call out and say before the Lord, your God, "An Aramean [sought to] destroy my forefather, and he went down to Egypt and sojourned there with a small number of people, and there, he became a great, mighty, and numerous nation.
Devarim/Ki Tavo 26:5

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #122 on: February 25, 2010, 06:56:20 AM »
Dear Muman, who do some people compare blacks to apes?

Dan - Stay calm and be brave in order to judge correctly and make the right decision

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #123 on: February 26, 2010, 06:45:37 AM »
can you explain me what is Tzelem Elokim and the concept of I am that I Am?

Shalom HZ,

You ask some very 'deep' questions of me.  Both of those questions do not have an easy answer.

Hashem asked the Jewish people, in last weeks Torah reading, to build a sanctuary and he will dwell amongst us. The Rabbis teach us that the sanctuary he will dwell in is within us, if we make a place for him. May we merit to see Moshiach come and the rebuilding of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem.

Amen
thanks for the insightful information. It took me couple of days to understand the concept. The vasteness of the sea of knowledge will take time to understand for us mortals living in eastern world  :)

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #124 on: March 17, 2010, 06:29:13 AM »
Muman can you explain these versus:
From TEHILLIM (The Book Of Psalms)

Psalm 2   
8. Ask of me, and I will give thee the Gentiles for thy inheritance, and the utmost parts of the earth for thy possession.

Now by my understanding G-d is giving the Gentiles most of the earth for ther possession.

9. Thou shall rule them with a rod of iron and shalt break them in pieces like a potter's vessel.

I have no idea what this means and hope that you can explain.
The banding together by the nations of the world against Israel is the guarantee that their time of destruction is near and the final redemption of the Jew at hand.
Rabbi Meir Kahane