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Offline muman613

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #125 on: March 17, 2010, 07:46:04 PM »
Muman can you explain these versus:
From TEHILLIM (The Book Of Psalms)

Psalm 2   
8. Ask of me, and I will give thee the Gentiles for thy inheritance, and the utmost parts of the earth for thy possession.

Now by my understanding G-d is giving the Gentiles most of the earth for ther possession.

9. Thou shall rule them with a rod of iron and shalt break them in pieces like a potter's vessel.

I have no idea what this means and hope that you can explain.


This is very interesting...

Obviously there are some translation issues in the translation you give. Chabad has these lines translated as follows:

8. Request of Me, and I will make nations your inheritance, and the ends of the earth your possession.
9. You shall break them with an iron rod; like a potter's vessel you shall shatter them.

I dont think the word Goyim means gentiles in this context. The word Goyim is translated as Nations {which is the correct translation}.

I believe what this Psalm is saying is that if the Jewish people pray earnestly to Hashem that he will hear our prayers and deliver the enemies of the Jewish people, the nations which have risen against it, into our hands.

http://www.chabad.org/library/bible_cdo/aid/16223/showrashi/true

Rashis comments:

Quote
8. Request of Me, and I will make nations your inheritance, and the ends of the earth your possession.         ח.
Request of Me: Pray to Me whenever you come to battle your enemies.
9. You shall break them with an iron rod; like a potter's vessel you shall shatter them."         ט.
You shall break them: Heb. תרעם [like] תרוצצם.         :
with an iron rod: That is the sword.         :
you shall shatter them: Heb. תנפצם, you shall break them, and that is the expression of נפוץ throughout the Scriptures, a potsherd that is bro ken into fine pieces.

I will continue to research this question because there is possibly more to discuss about this.

http://www.sichosinenglish.org/books/bar-mitzvah/02.htm
Quote
A Day To Make A Request
The Talmud[43] relates that King David died on the festival of Shavuos. The books Tvuos Shor and Binyan Ariel state that since "the A-lmighty completes the days of the righteous exactly, from day to day" - for we find that many righteous people died on the very day that they were born - it follows that Shavuos is also the birthday of King David.

On the verse in Tehillim 2:7, "You are My son, I have begotten you this day", the Zohar[44] comments that this is the verse King David composed on the day of his Bar Mitzvah.[45]

In addition to that which at the Bris Milah the Nefesh Elokis entered the body, as the Alter Rebbe states in the beginning of his Shulchan Aruch, that is only the level of nefesh, ruach and neshamah. Thereafter, however, if one's mode of service is correct and as it should be, at the moment of Bar Mitzvah there is also drawn down the level of Atzilus.

This is the reason why Rabbi Shimon made a feast and simchah when Rabbi Elazar his son became Bar Mitzvah, a simchah similar to that of a wedding.

Since, as stated above, Shavuos is King David's birthday, it follows that the Bar Mitzvah of King David was also on Shavuos and the verse, "You are My son etc.," was spoken on Shavuos.

Since King David wrote this verse in Tehillim, a book read by every Jew, each according to his level (and particularly following the directive of my father-in-law the Previous Rebbe that one should recite the Book of Tehillim as it is divided into the days of the month - and this institution is applicable to all - and even those who recite the Tehillim in a different order should also recite them as they are divided monthly - and in fact this mode of reciting Tehillim is becoming more and more widespread), it therefore follows that all the things that King David said in Tehillim for Knesses Yisrael are openly revealed to each Jew according to his level, including this verse and its contents, "You are My son, I have begotten you this day, Only ask it of Me and I will make nations your inheritance, and the ends of the earth your possession."

The sense of the verse is: what we will ask from G-d He will fulfill - each Jew his heart's requests.[46]
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

Offline muman613

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #126 on: March 17, 2010, 07:53:29 PM »
More about Psalm 2 which appears to have been misinterpreted by the Christians:

http://www.oztorah.com/2010/02/david-kimchis-response-to-christianity-in-his-psalm-commentary/


...

The Hebrew text of Psalm 2, with a translation by myself, accompanies this paper. There are many problems in the text, including the relationship of Psalm 2 to Psalm 1, but we will not be examining those matters which do not appear germane to Kimchi’s anti-Christian polemics. We do, however, need to ascertain the context of the psalm.

The overall theme of the psalm is the struggle of a Divinely-appointed king to establish his authority against hostile rulers. The Hebrew calls the king’s opponents goyyim and le’umim, “nations” and “peoples” – led by melachim and roz’nim, “kings” and “princes”. One possibility is that this points to a historical event in which tribes or regimes seek to overthrow an actual king, probably David, at the beginning of his reign (see Psalm 89:21-38; II Sam. 5:17 depicts the Philistines opposing David’s assumption of the throne). Others see it as a prophecy of the problems the future Messiah will have in establishing himself. Both approaches are found in Jewish commentary, though Rashi rejects the messianic theory, saying, “Our rabbis expound it as relating to King Messiah, but according to the plain meaning it is proper to interpret it in connection with David”. Some writers see the psalm as a combination of the historical and the messianic.

A third possibility is that the psalm reflects an internal Jewish struggle between a righteous king appointed by G-d and a group of nobles whose interests are under threat. Samuel Daiches says that “no foreign nations and no foreign kings are mentioned in it. Psalm 2 is… entirely Jewish, that is, it deals only with the land and the people of the Psalmist” (Studies in the Psalms, 1930, page 38).

In considering the third theory, we need not be too concerned by words like kings and princes, since ancient modes of speech use monarchical terms for people of power and substance, e.g. Kohelet 1:1, where “king in Jerusalem” may be merely a substantial land-owner.

Similarly, goyim in verse 1 need not be “nations” but can be haughty, prominent men (cf. Psalm 7:9-10, though verses 8-9 present a problem in this respect); eretz in verse 2 need not be “the earth” but can denote “the land”, i.e. the land of Israel. The reference to world domination need not be taken literally; Gunkel (Die Psalmen, 1905) says the terminology comes from the king-talk of the ancient empires. Note that many other psalms also echo internal tension between the righteous and their opponents.

Kimchi adopts the historical theory: “Some interpret this psalm of Gog and Magog” (who wage war against the Messiah) “but the better explanation is that David uttered it concerning himself… He composed and recited this psalm at the beginning of his reign, when the nations gathered against him”. Whilst Kimchi admits that the messianic theory has support, the introduction to the book warns against regarding the psalms as prophecies. They manifest the Holy Spirit, but this differs from prophecy. Even if the psalm is messianic, Kimchi indignantly refutes the possibility that it can refer to Jesus.

In handling christological interpretations, his responses appear conventional, but we have the advantage of hindsight after many centuries in which the claims he rejects became the stock-in-trade of the conversionists whose tracts tended to be full of quotations and short on scholarship. The following are the christological issues he deals with in interpreting Psalm 2, followed by a selection of additional topics dealt with in other psalms.

Psalm 2 (translation by Raymond Apple)

1. Why do the powerful rage,
The nobles utter worthless rants?

2. The princes of the land set themselves up,
The rulers conspire together
Against the Lord and His anointed.

3. (Saying,) “Let us snap their cords
And throw off their ropes from upon us!”

4. He who sits in heaven laughs –
The Lord mocks them.

5. Then He rebukes them in His anger,
He frightens them in His wrath:

6. “It is I who established My king
On Zion, My holy mountain!”

7. I relate the decree:
The Lord said to me, “You are My son:
This day I have given birth to you.

8. “Ask it of Me,
And I will make the peoples your inheritance,
The ends of the earth your possession.

9. “You shall break them with a rod of iron,
You shall shatter them like an earthern pot.”

10. Now, O princes, be sensible –
Be chastised, O judges of the land.

11. Serve the Lord with awe,
Rejoice with trembling.

12. Worship (Him) in purity,
Lest He be angry, and you perish in the way
When His anger flares up in a moment -

Happy are they who take refuge in Him!

Christological issues

1. G-d has appointed a king and calls him “My son” (verse 7). Kimchi says no-one can literally be G-d’s son. Metaphorically, whoever serves G-d is His son. Israel are called G-d’s son (Exodus 4:22). Even the stars are called sons of G-d (Job 38:7).

2. The king is begotten of G-d (verse 7). Again this cannot be true literally. G-d is not flesh and blood. “Begotten” is a metaphor and means appointed or anointed.

3. G-d says, “Ask of Me and I will give the nations for your inheritance” (verse 8). If Jesus is G-d, how can he ask anything of G-d? And if G-d gives the son power, does this not reduce the Almighty’s own power?

4. G-d intends the king to have power over the world (verse 8). If it means earthly power it cannot apply to Jesus since he was not a political figure. If it means spiritual power, even centuries after his death not all peoples accept him.

5. Even if nash’ku bar (verse 12) means “kiss the son”, the most it indicates is “pay homage (as a servant kisses his master’s hand) to the chosen one (the king)”. Bar can mean to choose, as in I Samuel 17:8. The usual word for son is ben (as in verse 7). Bar is son in Aramaic but the only Biblical instance is Proverbs 31:2. A better translation is “Pay homage in purity”, since bar is pure or clear in other places in the Psalms (e.g. 24:4, 73:1). In any case the verse tells us to worship G-d, not the son, whoever he may be.

...
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

Offline muman613

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #127 on: March 17, 2010, 08:13:23 PM »
Also there appears to be confusion in this Psalm where Christian translations include this line

12. Arm yourselves with purity lest He become angry and you perish in the way, for in a moment His wrath will be kindled; the praises of all who take refuge in Him.

The mistranslation is "Kiss the son"...


http://www.messiahtruth.com/psal2.html
Quote


The verse Psalms 2:12 is a significant item in the portfolio of Christian apologists and missionaries.  The rendition of the Hebrew phrase  (nashqu var), which means do homage in purity, as Kiss the Son by Christian translators is designed to line up this psalm by King David with Christian theology and messianic paradigm.

The analysis presented in this essay will demonstrate how this so-called "proof text" has been fashioned with a manipulation of Hebrew text from the Hebrew Bible that aims to "retrofit" Christianity into it.  When the Psalm is read in the Hebrew text, or in an accurate translation thereof, the true and entirely different perspective unfolds.

Excepting two revisions from the Hebrew, one obvious and the other subtle, the two translations are reasonably consistent.  The obvious revision occurs at Psalms 2:12, where the two translations disagree on the opening phrase, and where the Christian rendition imputes a heavy dose of Christology into the context of King David's words.  The subtle change is at Psalms 2:7, where the KJV translators have replaced the term "son" with "Son", an action that enhances the Christological appeal of this psalm ("Son" is also used as part of the revision in Psalms 2:12).  In addition, tenses of some verbs were changed, but these do not have a serious impact the context. 
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

Offline YimachShemotoIslam

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #128 on: March 19, 2010, 07:04:22 AM »
Dear Muman, have you ever eaten hummus or falafel?

Dan - Stay calm and be brave in order to judge correctly and make the right decision

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #129 on: March 19, 2010, 03:20:53 PM »
Dear Muman, have you ever eaten hummus or falafel?



Thats a question?

Of course I have... Everyone I know tries to get me to eat their hummus... I am not the biggest hummus fan but I have it on occasion. I also have had Falafel on occasion also. I do not have these foods regularly though.

I suspect it may be because I am Ahskenazic in heritage and these foods are more Sephardic {I think}... I am more inclined to eat Gefilte Fish and Cholent...

You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #130 on: March 21, 2010, 09:41:28 AM »
Dear Muman, can you explain to me exactly what a dhimmi is?

Dan - Stay calm and be brave in order to judge correctly and make the right decision

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #131 on: March 21, 2010, 12:29:38 PM »
Dear Muman, can you explain to me exactly what a dhimmi is?



Well, YemachShemo, Dhimmi is the arabic word which describes a legal class for non-believers in the cult of Islam. Both Jews and Christians were allowed to live, as second class citizens albeit, instead of being killed for not converting. As a second class citizen the dhimmi had to wear distinctive clothing or else be beaten or killed. The dhimmi has no legal rights against a muslim and must always give deference to a muslim over a co-religionist. Dhmmitude is an evil system which is inherently unfair to the dhimmi. Dhimmis have slightly better treatment than animals.

Here is a review of a book on the Dhimmi:



http://www.jewishmag.com/57mag/dhimmi/dhimmi.htm

Dhimmi
Reviewed by Aviv Goldstein

The Dhimmi is the Arabic term that refers to its non-Islamic embracing population that has the ignominious dishonor of living in Islamic conquered lands. In a similar manner to the Jewish reference to a non-Jew as being a goy, so too the term dhimmi refers to non-Muslims. However unlike the Jewish term, goy, and much more important, the dhimmi is a distinctly subjugated second class non-citizen almost slave who is subjected to dictatorial deprivation of any legal and human rights since he is a non-Muslim permanent resident in a Muslim state.

Dhimmi is also the name of a book written by Bat Ye'or, a pseudonym, of a woman who grew up in Egypt as a British citizen and observed first hand the Islamic treatment of non-Muslims. Based on serious research, Dhimmi was first published in French in 1971, translated into English in 1985, later into Hebrew and Russian, Dhimmi is a must reading for anyone seriously desiring an understanding of Middle-East politics and the rationale of the Arab mentality.

The first part of the book describes the state of affairs of the dhimmi, the basis and development for dhimmitude in Islam, and the relationship of the jihad, the war to conquer territory for Islam to the status of dhimmi.

Throughout earliest Islamic history, the conquered peoples by advancing Muslim armies were given the choice of either converting, being killed, or living as a conquered people, a dhimmi. These subjugated people were suspended in time and space, for dhimmitude meant being barely tolerated in your dispossessed land.

Both Jews and Christians alike suffered the ignominious life of having their fate decided upon the whim of despotic rulers. Although a legal definition of the dhimmi exists, that they must pay various taxes and tolls, that they must live a second class life and give deference to their Muslim neighbors, much of their tragic existence depended on the whims of despotic rulers and frenzied Arab mobs who denied them even the little that was given to them through Islamic law.

In 622 CE when Muhammad began his systematic conquering of pagan Arab populations and territories in the Arab desserts and peninsulas, he set up a precedent of conversion, death or servitude. Mixing war and religion, he utilized and abrogated relationships with non-Muslims to gain political and eventual territorial gains. A shrewd politician, Muhammad took advantage of non-belligerency pacts to attack and subjugate populations. In 628, after a long siege of Khaybar, lasting a month and a half, the inhabitants surrendered under terms of a treaty known as the dhimma. According to this agreement Muhammad allowed the Jews living there to continue to cultivate the land on the condition that they cede to him half of their produce, but he reserved the right to cancel the agreement and expel them whenever he desired. This became the prototype of all future subjugations. Hence making agreements and then breaking them to gain political gains became a hallmark of Muslim armies.

As the Muslims grew more powerful, their holy wars spread out beyond Arabia. The jihad became a war of conquest subject to a code which was the elimination of infidels. Truces were allowed, but never a lasting peace.

The jihad became a concept that divided the world into two separate groups. One was the dar al harab, the territory of war, and the other was the dar al Islam, the territory of Islam, which was the Muslim land where Islamic law reigns. Jihad is a normal state of being in the dar al harab which will only end with the conversion of the entire world to Islam.

The concept of jihad was simple - conquering the world for the true religion, Islam, translated into forced conversions, killings, taking slaves, seizing properties. This method enriched the perpetrators of the jihad, paid for their armies and brought wealth to the Arab nations. Participation in jihad was obligatory, either by participation or by aiding in one of many manners.

The manner in which the rules of dhimmitude were applied varied according to the political circumstances and the disposition of the ruler. There were periods of tolerance which gave a small degree of security to the dhimmis. However the fanaticism which could be riled up by the clergy could change the situation in small time. If the local Muslim population became intolerant or jealous of the successes of the dhimmi, then a pogrom would ensue. Communities could find themselves evicted, women raped, exorbitant ransoms placed on them, children abducted and forced to convert, and in other cases mass murders of the dhimmi population was condoned.

Rules would be formulated to deny the dhimmi due process of the law. Discriminatory and restrictive dress and behavior codes would be enacted and severely enforced to reduce the dhimmi into a state of despair and poverty. Dehumanization of the dhimmi was not uncommon, and generally the rule. Various forms of physical abuse were common.

Many times distinctive dress was specified to identify a dhimmi that he would be unable to either mix with a Muslim or even walk in a Muslim area of a city. Other rules specified such demeaning dress codes as not wearing shoes or sandals, not using certain colors, wearing stars on their clothing. Dhimmis were often prohibited from working in many occupations. Even rules were made as to how a dhimmi could ride a mule to distinguish him from a Muslim.

The non-observance of these rules would entail a severe beating. Often passing a Muslim on the wrong side would begin a beating that could leave a dhimmi mortally wounded. Since the dhimmis were denied the ability to testify against a Muslim, there was absolutely no recourse

---------------------

The book is rich in sources both from Islam, from the communities subjected to dhimmitude, and from third party observations of the predicament that the restricted communities were subjected to. The author spent much time on research and documentation to produce a substantial look at the true face of Islam through the centuries in their relationship to other peoples living among them. The message is clear that Islam is not a tolerant religion; it fosters and condones belligerent and aggressive actions towards those people who choose not to embrace Islam.

This book is backed with much documentation of various dhimmi communities from all areas of Muslim rule. Included in the book are speeches of various influential Arabs, texts from various middle-age sources and reports taken from British consuls through out centuries from archives testifying to the conditions of the dhimmi communities.

Included in the book are rare pictures and photographs depicting the dhimmi and his community.

Dhimmi is easy reading and perhaps the most needed reading for the serious student of Middle Eastern politics in our time. The Dhimmi is published by Associated University Presses, 440 Forsgate Drive, Cranbury, New Jersey 08512. It can be ordered via the net, local bookstores, and should be in your local public library.
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

Offline Irish Zionist

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #132 on: March 21, 2010, 03:32:57 PM »
Muman I still do not understand what it means? Is their anywhere specific because it's very confusing.
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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #133 on: March 23, 2010, 12:54:24 PM »


What is Muman and how does it relate to 613?

And what are you wearing?
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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #134 on: March 23, 2010, 05:29:32 PM »


What is Muman and how does it relate to 613?

And what are you wearing?


I think your questions are getting funny...

MUMAN is a concatenation of my first initial and my last name... 613 is the # of commandments a Jew is supposed to observe in the Torah...

There is a connection between my name and the 613... The nicname muman613 is the connection of my internet identity and the commandments which I cherish.

What am I wearing? Well nothing out of the ordinary. I work in a high-technology office in Silicon Valley and I dress professionally... But I am distinguished in my environment... I proudly wear a Baseball cap which covers my kippah and often I wear my tzit-tzits {fringes} dangling out of my pants {sometimes I tuck them in when going to the lunchroom}.


Tzit-Tzits

PS: IZ I have not forgotten your question. I have not had time to do more research into that question. I hopefully, bizras Hashem, will address that question next week {after the 1st two days of the Holiday}.
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #135 on: March 23, 2010, 09:34:12 PM »
Shalom Muman!

How do Jews observe tithing today?  What does Talmud say about tithing?  In the Tanach it seems there are 3 different types of tithing.

1. The tithing that should go to the Levites, 2. The Levites giving 10% of a 10% to the Priests and 3.  Deuteronomy 14:23 - festival tithe.  Am I correct?

Also it is my understanding that tithes were only food, agricultural products and cattle.  Ancient Jews never tithed money (carpenters, teachers, plumbers, soldiers etc. did not tithe).

Can you please explain?

Thanks!

CZ
Isaiah 62:1 -  For Zion's sake I am not silent, And for Jerusalem's sake I do not rest, Till her righteousness go out as brightness, And her salvation, as a torch that burns.

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #136 on: March 24, 2010, 08:00:20 AM »

what are ths 613 commandments and how do you memorise them?


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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #137 on: March 24, 2010, 08:06:23 AM »
Which tech firm do you work for? Google? Microsoft?
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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #138 on: March 24, 2010, 10:21:51 AM »
Which tech firm do you work for? Google? Microsoft?


I will not answer this fully because JTF has enemies and people may try to look for me if I give too much information...

I work about four blocks from Ciscos main campus in Silicon Valley... Google is not very far away either {I think within 5 miles}. My companies office is located amongst many well-known firms including Creative Labs, LSI, and others...

Also about 12 years ago I had an interview at Microsoft in Seattle and came very close to working for them... Those who know me know I am not a big fan of MS Windows {Ive been using Linux exclusively for almost 10 years now}.

You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #139 on: March 24, 2010, 10:39:24 AM »
What is worse Tom and Jerry and Courage the cowardly dog?

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #140 on: March 24, 2010, 03:32:31 PM »
Which tech firm do you work for? Google? Microsoft?


I will not answer this fully because JTF has enemies and people may try to look for me if I give too much information...

I work about four blocks from Ciscos main campus in Silicon Valley... Google is not very far away either {I think within 5 miles}. My companies office is located amongst many well-known firms including Creative Labs, LSI, and others...

Also about 12 years ago I had an interview at Microsoft in Seattle and came very close to working for them... Those who know me know I am not a big fan of MS Windows {Ive been using Linux exclusively for almost 10 years now}.




You don't have any enemies. You don't fight with anyone.

What do you do at your job?

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Offline YimachShemotoIslam

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #141 on: March 26, 2010, 04:46:43 PM »
Dear Muman, can you explain why so many blacks want to name themselves after Arabic names I.E. Jamal, Kareem, Ali. etc?

Dan - Stay calm and be brave in order to judge correctly and make the right decision

Offline Sveta

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #142 on: April 13, 2010, 01:23:44 AM »
Hmm linux is like the dark side to me. Plus I'm into pc gaming so I need to be hooked on Windows.
Well I have a question...what do you think about Thanksgiving for Jews?
I don't celebrate it personally but I have family and friends who do. I am never rude about them celebrating it, other than me saying how I don't understand that "holiday" or why they would want to. Honestly, I don't get it. I don't celebrate it personally because I see it as a gentile made day and to me every day is a day of thanksgiving to HaShem. Then it seems like some secular commercial day, and I don't get the appeal of sitting around a turkey and pie once a year to be thankful IF people really are thankful anyways. I have some friends who celebrate it (ok more like family) and when they do all they do is sit down and eat, not ever a word of "thanks". To me this is an awful day. All I do is just like xmas I go online, go out walking. I understand that American culture is attached to these "holidays" but to me they are not MY holidays! My holidays are Purim, Chanukah, Yom Kippur etc..

Then when people see that I don't care about things like thanksgiving (or the 4th of July etc) they act offended but ESPECIALLY for refusing to care about Thanksgiving. Everyone makes such a big deal out of it! They even act angered saying who am I to tell them if they are allowed to celebrate it. Well GO celebrate it all you want, I don't believe in it! (Ok I'm ranting now!)

My question...am I doing something wrong? When I see people celebrating it, I don't become arrogant or mean or bully them about it, I leave them alone. If they ask me I'll say that I don't agree with it. If they ask me to join I'm be polite but say I personally don't do it. Also do YOU celebrate thanksgiving yourself?
I honestly can never see myself celebrating this day, it's like a total farce to me.

Offline muman613

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #143 on: April 13, 2010, 02:10:34 AM »
Hmm linux is like the dark side to me. Plus I'm into pc gaming so I need to be hooked on Windows.
Well I have a question...what do you think about Thanksgiving for Jews?
I don't celebrate it personally but I have family and friends who do. I am never rude about them celebrating it, other than me saying how I don't understand that "holiday" or why they would want to. Honestly, I don't get it. I don't celebrate it personally because I see it as a gentile made day and to me every day is a day of thanksgiving to HaShem. Then it seems like some secular commercial day, and I don't get the appeal of sitting around a turkey and pie once a year to be thankful IF people really are thankful anyways. I have some friends who celebrate it (ok more like family) and when they do all they do is sit down and eat, not ever a word of "thanks". To me this is an awful day. All I do is just like xmas I go online, go out walking. I understand that American culture is attached to these "holidays" but to me they are not MY holidays! My holidays are Purim, Chanukah, Yom Kippur etc..

Then when people see that I don't care about things like thanksgiving (or the 4th of July etc) they act offended but ESPECIALLY for refusing to care about Thanksgiving. Everyone makes such a big deal out of it! They even act angered saying who am I to tell them if they are allowed to celebrate it. Well GO celebrate it all you want, I don't believe in it! (Ok I'm ranting now!)

My question...am I doing something wrong? When I see people celebrating it, I don't become arrogant or mean or bully them about it, I leave them alone. If they ask me I'll say that I don't agree with it. If they ask me to join I'm be polite but say I personally don't do it. Also do YOU celebrate thanksgiving yourself?
I honestly can never see myself celebrating this day, it's like a total farce to me.

Shalom Zionist YY,

It sounds like you have the same issue which happened last Valentines day when my mother asked me if I did anything special for Valentines day. I told her that I did not celebrate secular {and especially days which have other religious connotations} holidays.

I will have a Turkey on Thanksgiving but without the entire Thanksgiving ritual. I have posted in some thread last year about the Jewish outlook on these holidays and whether there is a prohibition from taking part in celebrations which have religious connotations for other religions. Torah is clear that a Jew should not engage in the ways of the nations.

My mother sometimes takes it like I am trying to say that those who do so are doing something wrong. I do feel that a Jew should not become too involved in the rituals of the exile since we will become trapped by some of these customs. I have heard that some familys have problems for years because they will actually miss the Christmas season {although some scoundrels I have heard are trying to bring American Christmas to Israel}.

I will not long for any secular holidays once Moshiach comes... I only observe the Jewish yom tovim.

PS: A Jew should make every day Thanksgiving. When we say the blessings over the Bread before the meal, the blessings on the hand washing, and the blessings after the meal we make every day a day of giving thanks to Hashem...


See this article for an indepth discussion of "Is Thanksgiving Kosher?" @ http://www.tfdixie.com/special/thanksg.htm

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A Halachic Analysis of Thanksgiving

Having reviewed the history of Thanksgiving, it is now necessary to turn to the question of halachic issues involved in its "celebration". The first, and most significant issue, is whether it is permissible to eat a Thanksgiving meal, with the classical foods that American tradition indicates one should eat at this meal: turkey (15) and cranberry sauce. Among the authorities of the previous generation, three different positions have been taken on this topic, and these three positions have each been accepted by various halachic authorities of the current generation.

However, before these three positions can be understood, a certain background into the nature of the prohibition to imitate Gentile customs must be understood. (16) Tosafot understands that two distinctly different types of customs are forbidden by the prohibition of imitating Gentile customs found in Leviticus 18:3. The first is idolatrous customs and the second is foolish customs found in the Gentile community, even if their origins are not idolatrous. (17) Rabbenu Nissim and Maharik disagree and rule that only customs that have a basis in idolatrous practices are prohibited. Apparently foolish -- but secular -- customs are permissible so long as they have a reasonable explanation (and are not immodest). (18) Normative halacha follows the ruling of the Ran and Maharik. As noted by Rama:

    * Those practices done as a [Gentile] custom or law with no reason one suspects that it in an idolatrous practice or that there is a taint of idolatrous origins; however, those customs which are practiced for a reason, such as the physician who wears a special garment to identify him as a doctor, can be done; the same is true for any custom done out of honor or any other reason is permissible. (19)

As will be seen later, there are authorities who favor being strict for the opinion of the Gra, who rules that the only time "secular" customs are permissible is when they have a Jewish origin. (20) According to this approach, secular customs created by Gentiles are prohibited even when their origins are not religious.

Additionally -- and independent of the halachic obligation to avoid Gentile religious customs -- Jewish law forbids a Jew from actually celebrating idolatrous religious events himself. Thus, a Jew may not attend an idolatrous "Indian" (21) office party or directly facilitate its observance. (22) So too, a Jew may not attend a birthday party for an idol worshipper if the birthday party includes worship of idols. (23)
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

Offline Sveta

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #144 on: April 26, 2010, 10:41:43 PM »
Thank you so much for your help Muman!

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #145 on: June 25, 2010, 01:13:39 PM »
can you pls tell me what is this?


Offline muman613

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #146 on: June 25, 2010, 01:42:30 PM »
can you pls tell me what is this?



Shalom HZ,

You have posted a picture of a Jew donning Tefillin. Tefillin is one of the commandments of the Torah which an observant Jew is to obey.

The commandment of Tefillin comes from the verse "And you shall bind them as a sign on your arm, and they shall be as frontlets on your head between your eyes" (Deuteronomy 6:8).

Tefillin are ritual objects which consist of two black leather boxes with leather straps which a Jew will bind to his head and his arm during the process of praying. The Oral law has many halachos concerning the making of the leather boxes.

Each box also contains a parchment which contains the sections of the Torah which describe this mitzvah. This scroll contains portions of the Shema which outline the mitzvahs of Tefillin, Tzit-Tzits, and Mezuzah...

Here is some more information:

http://www.beingjewish.com/mitzvos/tefillin.html

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The Torah tells us "And you shall bind them as a sign on your arm, and they shall be as frontlets on your head between your eyes" (Deuteronomy 6:8). This is the Mitzvah of Tefillin, though of course the details are much more complex than that.

The Torah tells us in four places that we should put on tefillin. (The four places are: Deut.6:4-9; Deut. 11:13-21; Exodus 13:1-10; and Exodus 13:11-16.) Each of these places is a separate chapter in the Torah (according to the original chapter and paragraph system, not according to the more popular one now in use, which was created by Christians and bears no relation or similarity to the original system).

Therefore, each of these chapters are written on small pieces of parchment and placed into leather housings, which a man places on the arm and the head, along with special leather straps.

The Rabbis say many great things about the Mitzvah of Tefillin. The Sefer Hachinuch (Book of Jewish Education) says that it is one of the Mitzvos that helps protects us against sin.

...

We put tefillin on once a day, usually for the morning prayers.

We may not wear tefillin at night.

The Laws of creating tefillin are very complex. It is impossible for a layperson to make them. They must be written with Halachically acceptable ink, on Halachically acceptable parchment. Each letter must be formed according to specific and exacting details. If only one point on one letter is slightly rounded off when it should be pointed, the entire pair of tefillin is invalid. The housings must be perfectly square when viewed from the top. Even the stitches that keep the housing closed must be square when viewed from above, and may be done only with Halachically acceptable kosher animal sinews.

The letters must all be written in order. If a letter has been written incorrectly, it cannot be fixed out of sequence. Sometimes one bad letter can invalidate an entire pair of tefillin.

Since there are so many Laws about tefillin, one should buy them only from an honest Jew who knows the Laws, and can be trusted to make them correctly. A dishonest man might find a problem, and fix it incorrectly, just to save money. Therefore we must be very careful from whom we buy our tefillin.

When you go to buy tefillin, be aware that there are various levels of quality in tefillin. This is not a scam. The more expensive ones are actually better, and they will also last longer. They are also more preferred, the Talmud says, because they are created with a greater adherence to various spiritual concepts. But you should get what you are ready, willing and able to buy.

Get your tefillin checked periodically -- at least once every four years, preferably once a year if possible. Any other time, if you see something wrong, such as the housings bending slightly, or paint chipping or cracking, get your tefillinchecked immediately.

Here are some of the Laws you should know about wearing tefillin.

If for some reason you have only one half of the set, whether it be only the one for the head, or only the one for the arm, put that one on and recite only the blessing for that one.

When putting on tefillin it is very important to have a clean body. In addition to general cleanliness, one must be especially careful to be clean after going to the bathroom.

Someone who has no control over what comes out of his body is forbidden to wear tefillin. Anyone in that situation should discuss it with his Rabbi to find out when and how he may wear tefillin.

One should go to the bathroom before putting on tefillin, or at least be absolutely sure he will not have to go while wearing the tefillin. If while wearing tefillin you feel the need to go to the bathroom, you must immediately remove the tefillin and go.

If you feel the need to pass gas while wearing tefillin, you must first remove your tefillin.

Never take tefillin or any holy item into a bathroom.

While wearing tefillin, one should think no thoughts at all except thoughts of Hashem, Torah or prayer. All the more so should he be careful about what he says out loud.

We may wear tefillin only during the day.

We do not put on tefillin on Shabbos.

Tefillin should be put on your weaker hand. If you are right-handed, use your right hand to put your tefillin on your left hand. If you are left-handed, use your left hand to put tefillin on your right hand. If you are ambidextrous, you must ask your Rabbi, because each case is different. If you are unable to contact a Rabbi for some reason, assume in the interim that the hand with which you write is your stronger hand (for this purpose, at least).

Always treat your tefillin with the greatest of respect and reverence. Do not remove them from the bag by shaking them out of the bag, for example. Always take them out carefully, and put them back carefully.

To show our love for the Mitzvah, we use our stronger hand to put the tefillin onto our weaker hand. We also use our stronger hand to put the tefillin on our head. When taking off the tefillin, we use our weaker hand, to show our reluctance to take off the Mitzvah.

Tefillin are made of leather. That means that you must keep them safe from things that hurt leather, like moisture and extreme temperatures.

Chabad has an excellent site for Jews to learn about Tefillin...

http://www.chabad.org/generic_cdo/aid/102436/jewish/Tefillin.htm
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

Offline Rubystars

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #147 on: June 27, 2010, 12:59:50 AM »
Do you think other sects of Judaism in the far past also used tefillin, or was it only the modern sect? For example did the Saducees use it? Did King David use it?

Offline muman613

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #148 on: June 27, 2010, 10:27:51 AM »
Do you think other sects of Judaism in the far past also used tefillin, or was it only the modern sect? For example did the Saducees use it? Did King David use it?

It is clear that every Jew from Sinai used Tefillin. It is believed that Hashem himself 'wears' tefillin {Of course we are talking metaphorically because everyone knows that Hashem has no corporeality}... I take this from the Rashi, who takes it from the Talmud:

http://www.torah.org/learning/Parasha-insights/5761/kisisa.html

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The Talmud [Brachos 7A] explains that Moshe wanted to understand why some of the righteous prosper while others suffer and why some of the wicked prosper while others suffer. Moshe wanted to fathom the seeming injustices in the world as we perceive it.

"And He (Hashem) said: You are not able to see my face, for no man can see my face and (continue to) live... and you will see the back of me. [33:20,23]"

That explains it! No more problems in understanding the world’s seeming injustices!

And just in case that doesn't do a thorough enough job of leaving us in the dark, Rashi quotes the Talmud [Brachos 7A] that teaches that Hashem showed Moshe the knot of His tefillin {phylacteries}.

Now it's perfectly clear! You see it wasn't actually Hashem’s back but rather it was the knot of His tefillin! Thanks!

The Talmud [Brachos 6A] shows the source from which we derive that Hashem wears tefillin and reveals that His parchments contain the verse: "Who is like your people, Israel, a unique nation on the earth. [Divrei Hayamim I 17]"

Since the commandment of donning tefillin is one of the 613 mitzvot from the Torah it is clear that it came straight from Sinai and Jews have been wearing them from the beginning of Jewish history...

http://www.shemayisrael.com/Parasha/kahn/archives/lech68.htm

NOTE: The stupid forum filter changes p*a*r*s*h*a to P*a*r*a*s*h*a which I think is dumb... It messes up every link to this site...

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Abraham's descendants' reward

This concept is mentioned in the Midrash Tanchuma. The Midrash says: "G'd said I will bring about a war between the kings of the world in order that Abraham eventually will come and receive all the spoils." However, Abraham, in his great modesty, refused to keep what was rightfully his and returned the spoils of war to its original owners. The Talmud (Sotah 17a) explains that in this merit Abraham and his descendants were rewarded with two special mitzvot (commandments): the mitzvah of tzitzis and the mitzvah of tefillin.


http://israel613.com/books/IMPORTANCE_OF_MITZVAH_OF_TEFILLIN-E.pdf

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19) Every single Jew is surrounded by seven Mitzvot. He has Tefillin on his arm and head, a Mezuzah on his door, and four Tzitzit on his garment. Thus, King David said (Psalm 119:164), "I will praise You each day with seven." Tosefta, Berachos 6:31

Obviously those 'sects' which disregard the Oral tradition will have no Tefillin because the laws of Tefillin are only in the Oral Law. The mention of them in Chumash is only that we should 'bind these words as frontlets before our eyes'... Of course I don't know for sure but this is what I believe.

http://www.messiahtruth.com/orallaw.html
« Last Edit: June 27, 2010, 10:35:07 AM by muman613 »
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

Offline Rubystars

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #149 on: June 28, 2010, 08:52:27 AM »
Very interesting Muman.