Author Topic: The Divine Code Daily Dose  (Read 42226 times)

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Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #475 on: March 11, 2020, 10:53:19 AM »
It appears that if a person errs in judging his known action as permissible, he is only liable for the transgression if he should have learned that it was forbidden, as when his whole community knows the Noahide Commandments. But in a community that does not know some of these commandments at all, and it is not possible for a resident to learn them, he is not liable for them (but he also cannot be pious) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 66).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #476 on: March 17, 2020, 03:06:09 AM »
Rather, a Gentile should first be taught and warned about the Noahide Code, and only afterwards is he responsible for his actions, in regard to the prohibitions against serving idols, forbidden relations and eating meat that was severed from a living animal. However, for the main prohibitions against murder and stealing, and for the commandment to establish courts of justice, which are all logically binding, there is no exemption for not knowing they are forbidden (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 66).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #477 on: March 21, 2020, 10:10:45 PM »
An example of a type of murder that might not be known as such is euthanasia, which logically could be viewed as a kindness if the person's physical suffering is ended. The rule here would be that in a community where the concepts of the Noahide Commandments are not known, one would be liable to death for an act of homicide, but not for euthanasia (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 66).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #478 on: March 30, 2020, 09:36:31 AM »
It also appears that there is no "erring" in regard to blasphemy. Once one knows that there is a G-d, and he knows His Name, it is logically clear that it is forbidden to curse G-d. (But if one does not know about G-d at all, or does not understand what he is saying - in Hebrew or other languages - his curse is not regarded as blasphemy) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 66).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #479 on: March 31, 2020, 10:35:22 AM »
A Gentile who is forced to transgress one of the Seven Noahide Commandments is exempt from liability to physical or spiritual punishment for committing the transgression. Even if one is being forced to serve idols, he is permitted to do so, and he is not obligated to give up his life to avoid this. This applies to the other Noahide commandments as well,79 except for the prohibition against murder, for which a Gentile must submit even to being killed in order to avoid being forced to commit the transgression. (Regarding one who is being forced to injure another or to commit rape, see Part V, topic 2:5).

79 Rambam, Laws of Kings 10:2 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 66-67).


Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #480 on: April 01, 2020, 12:16:10 PM »
Just as it is permitted to transgress (other than committing murder, injury or rape) if coercers force one to do so on pain of death, so it is permitted to heal a person even if it involves a capital transgression, if it is a matter of life and death. A person is not obligated to give up his life in order not to transgress the commandments, other than for the exceptions cited above. (E.g., it is permitted to heal a person by feeding him meat that was severed from a living animal, if the person will die if he does not eat it and no other option is available. Neither the healer nor the patient is liable for this.) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 67).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #481 on: April 02, 2020, 11:38:04 AM »
If a Gentile is being forced to commit any act that is a capital sin within the Noahide Code, the question of whether or not he is permitted to give up his life in order to avoid the transgression is explained in Part V, Chapter 2 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 67).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #482 on: April 03, 2020, 10:41:44 AM »
A Gentile is not obligated in precepts of the Noahide Code or their liability until he is knowledgeable and responsible for his actions. This age is 13 full years for a male, and 12 full years for a female (provided that they have produced two pubic hairs). Some opinions say that even a minor who is knowledgeable prior to this age is responsible (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 67).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #483 on: April 05, 2020, 12:58:18 PM »
There is a debate between the later Rabbinic authorities regarding a set age for legal majority of Gentiles, or if there is no set age and it depends on the individual's mental maturity. From Rashi on Tractate Nazir 29b, the age of majority is a natural phenomena and not a decree of Torah Law, so there should be no difference between the age of majority for Jews and Gentiles.

S'dei Hemed (Pe'at Hasade Ma'arehet Gimmel) says that the simple interpretation of Rambam is a fixed, same age of majority for Jews and Gentiles (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 67).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #484 on: April 07, 2020, 06:26:11 AM »
One who is not knowledgeable, such as a deaf-mute, one who is mentally incompetent, or a minor, is exempt from any liability.79

79 Rambam, Laws of Kings 10:2 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 67).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #485 on: April 08, 2020, 07:55:56 PM »
One who is intoxicated is considered to be competent for all matters, and if he violates any of the Seven Noahide Commandments he is liable for punishment. However, if he reaches the intoxication of Lot (Genesis 19:33-35), at which point he is not cognizant of his actions, he is exempt from punishment.82

82 Rambam, Laws of Marriage, 4:18; Shulhan Aruh Hoshen Mishpat 235:22 (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 67-68).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #486 on: April 11, 2020, 12:13:03 AM »
It is forbidden for a Gentile to mislead or convince another to sin. Therefore, it is forbidden to teach others to serve idols, or to seduce a man or woman to commit adultery, or to convince another person to murder or steal. Any action that necessarily causes or helps another person to violate one of the Noahide commandments is forbidden (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 68).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #487 on: April 12, 2020, 10:02:07 PM »
It appears that this comes from the command to establish laws and courts, as Gentiles are commanded to influence others to keep the Noahide Commandments and not transgress them (e.g., by establishing a system of justice, with courts and police officers). A Gentile is permitted to do an act that causes but does not force someone to do wrong. It is forbidden for a Gentile to intentionally influence a person to violate a Noahide commandment, but it is not a capital sin. (One who hired an assassin is not liable for capital punishment by a Noahide court, but he is liable for punishment by G-d) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 68).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #488 on: April 15, 2020, 02:27:28 AM »
Even if the one misled is unaware that he will be performing a prohibited action, it is still forbidden to cause him to violate the prohibition.84

84 The Noahide Commandments not only prohibit a person from doing certain actions, but they also establish what deeds are undesirable and what situations G-d does not want to occur (see Likkutei Sihot vol. 5, p. 159-160). The author holds that one who transgresses this by causing another to transgress is violating the commandment to establish laws (dinim) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 68).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #489 on: April 22, 2020, 10:12:57 AM »
The Divine commandments have two dimensions: (a) their influence on the person who accepts the "yoke of the Kingship of Heaven," which fixes and corrects his character and thoughts, etc., and (b) their correction of the world, so that the world will become more correct, just and refined, according to G-d's will. The second dimension considers the negative influence on both the person and the world when a wrong is done, even unknowingly. Based on this principle, Or HaHayim on Gen. 20:6 explains the rebuke that G-d gave to Abimeleh in his dream, while he was being miraculously prevented from unknowingly committing adultery with Abraham's wife, Sarah: "I have saved you from sinning to Me" - i.e., "Even though you, Abimeleh, claimed to Me your innocence in this matter, since you did not know that Sarah was married, you should know that I saved you from doing the sinful act even unintentionally, because it would still be a sin against Me" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 68).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #490 on: April 26, 2020, 04:10:59 PM »
For example, if one had a piece of meat that was forbidden to be eaten because it was severed from a living animal (eiver min ha'hai), and he handed it to another person who thought he was receiving ordinary permitted meat to eat, this is prohibited. It is likewise forbidden to cause any other situation that resembles this (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 68-69).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #491 on: April 29, 2020, 04:41:14 AM »
Nevertheless, if one misleads another to transgress a commandment, the misleader is not liable for punishment by a Noahide court, unless the court sees a special need to enforce the commandment of dinim for the purpose of correcting the society. But he will be punished by G-d for misleading others and causing them to sin (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 69).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #492 on: May 01, 2020, 05:31:32 PM »
However, if one performs an action that may possibly cause or help another person to transgress, but he does not intend for this to happen (but instead his intention is for other reasons), there is no specific prohibition that prevents one from taking such actions. An example would be one who sells substances that idol-worshipers are known to use for their idolatrous rituals, but he does not know whether a particular customer has this intention in mind. The vendor may sell the substances to any customers, since his intention is for the sale, and he does not care what the customer might do with the product. But if it is known that a particular customer is buying this thing for the sake of idol worship, it is prohibited for the seller to assist him (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 69).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #493 on: May 06, 2020, 12:03:32 AM »
This only applies, however, when he is the only one providing the possibility for the other person to sin. But if this opportunity can be found without his assistance (e.g., if the product is legal and readily available in other stores as well), then even if he definitely knows that the intention of the customer is to commit idol worship with this product, then there is no prohibition against the sale. Still, it is pious to avoid doing things that could mislead another person to perform a prohibited act (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 69).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #494 on: May 10, 2020, 08:35:07 PM »
Just as a Gentile may not mislead another to sin, likewise if one sees someone violating one of the Seven Noahide Commandments or performing a related action which is forbidden by the Noahide Code, he is obligated to prevent the transgressor from continuing in the sin (if it is in his power to exert this influence without putting himself into danger, or even without considerable inconvenience). This is included in the commandment of dinim (establishing a judicial system) that is incumbent for Gentiles (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 69).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #495 on: May 18, 2020, 10:31:03 AM »
Note that topic 3:1 speaks about the obligation of authorities to uphold the Noahide commandments, by correcting and influencing the citizens in their observance, and by enforcing the laws. But obviously that is only if the society as a whole is capable of accepting the commandment of dinim, and if the courts will judge correctly. Here, instead, we explain the role of the individual, and if there is no such court, there is definitely no major responsibility on an individual to stop another person from continuing to sin (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 69-70).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #496 on: May 26, 2020, 12:34:49 AM »
There are opinions that a Gentile may not be punished for not fulfilling a positive aspect of his commandments (e.g. dinim). But it is clear that one is obligated to separate another from committing a sin, if he can do so without being at risk, and he is not permitted to turn away and say that it is not his concern, as Rambam writes in Laws of Kings 9:14: "To judge... and warn the people." This is not specifically a warning for Gentiles not to transgress, but rather to teach them the details of the Noahide Code (see Lehem Mishneh). It appears that it is also a logically clear obligation on all leaders of a society to teach the people the laws of the land, and surely the Divine precepts which they are commanded in - namely the Noahide Commandments. Therefore, it is logical that just as there is an obligation for the judges to enforce the laws and warn people about them, the same applies for all those who have the opportunity to prevent another from transgressing, and this is also included in the general precept "to compel all the nations of the world to accept the Seven Noahide Commandments" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 70).

Offline Israel Chai

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #497 on: May 26, 2020, 01:39:58 PM »
There are opinions that a Gentile may not be punished for not fulfilling a positive aspect of his commandments (e.g. dinim). But it is clear that one is obligated to separate another from committing a sin, if he can do so without being at risk, and he is not permitted to turn away and say that it is not his concern, as Rambam writes in Laws of Kings 9:14: "To judge... and warn the people." This is not specifically a warning for Gentiles not to transgress, but rather to teach them the details of the Noahide Code (see Lehem Mishneh). It appears that it is also a logically clear obligation on all leaders of a society to teach the people the laws of the land, and surely the Divine precepts which they are commanded in - namely the Noahide Commandments. Therefore, it is logical that just as there is an obligation for the judges to enforce the laws and warn people about them, the same applies for all those who have the opportunity to prevent another from transgressing, and this is also included in the general precept "to compel all the nations of the world to accept the Seven Noahide Commandments" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 70).

There is also an opinion that the many righteous Jews died in Poland because they didn't do enough to admonish their neighbors to keep the law. This can also include doing it wrong. If you scream at someone, "hell, you're going!", you haven't convinced him to be righteous, and now he says religious are screaming crazies and I am opposed. There are dozens of three hour long lectures I've watched on the correct way to talk to people and to admonish them, and it is an extremely delicate matter. Rambam says you are required to give anyone three compliments before one criticism or they won't listen. Thousands of more one liners I could put, but the point of all of them is you really have to stop and care for the person as a human being and let him know you're trying to do good for him and not condemn him.

This is an issue that arises with newcomers to Judaism and the Noachide laws. You found the source of truth, congratulations. Now you want to go scream at everyone that they're dumb and evil, but if the person who helped you return to Hashem had spoken in that way, you'd have left him hanging. Such criticism is mostly about the newcomers confirming to themselves that there's something different about them now.

The other side of the coin is saying you can't judge anyone and everything everyone does you accept. This also makes chilul Hashem because the people say they don't take their religion seriously and therefore it doesn't matter, and if very righteous people start down that path they put a kosher stamp on their evil.

It's a tall order, can't do nothing, can't go to the other side, can't do the right thing in the wrong way. But if you work on your pride to the point you can love a complete wicked person, hate what he does, and help him leave his evil, your communication skills across the board with drastically improve.
The fear of the L-rd is the beginning of knowledge

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #498 on: May 31, 2020, 01:40:04 AM »
Parents are obligated to provide education to their children, and specifically in the fulfillment of the Noahide Code. This education for the children is an obligation within the commandment of dinim, to strengthen the observance of the Noahide precepts in the world (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 70).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #499 on: June 07, 2020, 05:10:32 AM »
To the extent that his intellect can grasp, every child should be educated about the foundations of the Noahide faith, and about the infinite greatness of the King of kings, the Holy One, blessed be He, Who is the Source of life for every being. This education and training of the child, before he matures, will serve as a foundation of his service to God for his entire life, as it says (Proverbs 22:6): "Educate the child according to his way; even when he will be old he will not depart from it" (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 70).