Author Topic: The Divine Code Daily Dose  (Read 42165 times)

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Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #525 on: September 10, 2020, 10:14:07 PM »
Gentiles are permitted to read the 24 books of the Hebrew Bible, even with traditional explanations of the simple meaning (e.g., by Rashi), in order to correctly understand the verses. But it is forbidden for a Gentile to delve into study of the Written Torah (except for verses that discuss the Seven Noahide Commandments) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 75).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #526 on: September 16, 2020, 06:00:44 PM »
Rambam, Laws of the Torah Scroll 10:8: a Gentile may hold a Torah and read from it. It appears that the main traditional Jewish commentators of the Hebrew Bible (e.g., Rashi, Ramban, Sforno) are not included in the prohibition of Gentiles learning Torah in-depth as it is explained in Shulhan Aruh, because there it talks about analyzing the text in-depth by comparing verses and explaining them, to draw out the points of Torah Law that are implied within them. But those commentators (such as Rashi) whose sole purpose is to explain the simple meaning of the text do not derive in-depth conclusions from the verses. If they occasionally cite words of the Sages (such as Midrash) to explain how a verse is to be simply understood, it appears that the Gentile must look at the main point that the commentator is presenting (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 75).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #527 on: September 21, 2020, 02:16:41 AM »
These are Gen. 1:26-30, 2:16-25 (and possibly ch. 3), ch. 4, 6:1-12, 8:15-22, 9:1-7 (Possibly the first two Torah portions, Bereishit and Noah, are permitted for in-depth study, because they relate to humanity in general) (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 75).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #528 on: September 25, 2020, 07:33:46 PM »
It is obvious that it is permissible for a Gentile to recite verses from the Hebrew Bible as prayer, particularly the verses of Psalms. If a question in Torah Law arises for a Gentile and the verdict is not explicit and clearly explained in the permitted sources, he does not have the ability or power to identify the correct ruling. Rather, he must ask a reliable and observant Jewish Torah scholar, for only they have permission to explain the Torah and decide what the correct Torah-law ruling is in any particular situation (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 76).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #529 on: September 27, 2020, 06:57:54 PM »
This is concerning a questionable situation that requires a Torah-law decision, and deciding on an answer is equivalent to delving deeply into the Torah. More so, a Gentile may not be ordained to teach and expound the Torah, because that is solely the spiritual assignment of the Jews - to be deeply involved in Torah, and to delve into it for the purpose of deciding practical rulings on a Torah-law basis. This task is only given to observant Jewish Torah scholars who are trusted in their explanations of Oral Torah (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 76).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #530 on: October 05, 2020, 12:58:02 AM »
However, if a matter is easily understandable from learning about the Noahide Code and the conclusion is obvious, it appears clear that a Gentile is allowed to decide upon it for matters of personal practical observance. But it is essentially difficult to decide an exact conclusion for Torah law in general, and laypersons do not have the objectivity and breadth of Torah knowledge to be certain that they are making the correct ruling (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 76).

Offline Israel Chai

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #531 on: October 09, 2020, 03:01:00 AM »
However, if a matter is easily understandable from learning about the Noahide Code and the conclusion is obvious, it appears clear that a Gentile is allowed to decide upon it for matters of personal practical observance. But it is essentially difficult to decide an exact conclusion for Torah law in general, and laypersons do not have the objectivity and breadth of Torah knowledge to be certain that they are making the correct ruling (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 76).

This is why the second category of people that are overly strict next to "people that like to torture themselves" are "people that are ignorant" in Gemarra, you're afraid of breaking a law in an area you don't understand so you start forbidding everything permitted.
The fear of the L-rd is the beginning of knowledge

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #532 on: October 09, 2020, 03:12:53 AM »
This is why the second category of people that are overly strict next to "people that like to torture themselves" are "people that are ignorant" in Gemarra, you're afraid of breaking a law in an area you don't understand so you start forbidding everything permitted.

Would you agree that writing "G-d" is overly strict? I can provide sources which allow writing God's names in other languages for no reason.

Offline Israel Chai

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #533 on: October 09, 2020, 04:08:16 AM »
Would you agree that writing "G-d" is overly strict? I can provide sources which allow writing God's names in other languages for no reason.

Yes completely. I secretly habor fears that it becomes common knowledge that the word comes from a norse idol, or it might be seen as giving respect to an idol G-d forbid. In the meantime, totally over the top way of showing respect for Hashem however I can, little symbol - but there I think about respect for Hashem's name when I say it. We can be a bit kiddish with some of those things, it's a love thing, you just want to do something for Hashem all the time because you love him even if it isn't anything, and it's not like we're really forbidding or allowing something that is going to make our lives hard.
The fear of the L-rd is the beginning of knowledge

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #534 on: October 10, 2020, 03:34:18 PM »
The "secret" part of Torah that is called Kabbala is governed by the same principles as Talmud, regarding the parts a Gentile may learn.98

98 For parts of Kabbala that do not relate to the Noahide Code, it is delving into Torah for its own sake, since Gentiles cannot learn anything practical from that, so there is no benefit for them. This is the simple meaning of Tractate Hagigah 13a, that Jews may not teach the "secrets" of the Torah to Gentiles, and therefore Gentiles may not learn it by themselves either. Also, one may not learn original Kabbala texts (e.g. Zohar) without a fitting teacher, and therefore automatically it is impossible for Gentiles to learn true Kabbala by themselves. They would need to be taught by Jews, which is forbidden for a Jew to do if it extends to parts unrelated to the Noahide Code (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 76).

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: The Divine Code Daily Dose
« Reply #535 on: October 17, 2020, 06:01:36 AM »
As in Talmud, the parts that relate to the Noahide Code, e.g. knowledge of the greatness of God, His Unity, etc., are permitted, and are recommended. These parts from the Talmud have already been quoted and explained in later works, e.g. in Rambam's Mishneh Torah and in this work. Likewise, these parts from Kabbala are explained in later books. Studying from original sources without guidance is impractical (the Divine Code by Rabbi Moshe Weiner, Ask Noah International, 2018, p 76).