Author Topic: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge  (Read 10403 times)

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Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #175 on: November 29, 2018, 05:43:37 AM »
How should one be modest in his speech? One should not shout or shriek like an animal while speaking, nor even raise his voice overly much. Instead, he should speak gently to all people. In addition, he should take care not to stand at a distance when he speaks to someone, lest he appear to be like those who are haughty.

He should greet people before they greet him, so they will be pleased with him. He should judge everyone in a good light and speak favorably of others, never mentioning anything about another person that would cause that person to feel shame. He should follow the directive of the sages to “be of the disciples of Aaron [the High Priest], loving peace and pursuing peace.” He should not distort facts, or exaggerate a situation or minimize it, except in the interests of maintaining peace or sparing someone’s feelings, or the like. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 106)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #176 on: November 30, 2018, 07:05:51 AM »
If he sees that his words will be effective and will be given attention, he should speak; if they will not, he should keep silent. What is implied? He should not try to placate someone who is in the midst of experiencing anger, if it is clear that doing so will cause the person to become even angrier. He should not question someone who is in the midst of making a vow; rather, he should wait until the person’s mind is tranquil and calm. He should not comfort someone whose deceased loved one has not been buried yet, because a mourner is emotionally unsettled until after he has buried his dead. He should not look at a person who is being humiliated, but instead should turn his attention away. The same applies in other similar cases. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 106-107)


Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #177 on: December 01, 2018, 05:10:07 AM »
In all a person’s ways, he should be very modest – as it says, “Walk discreetly before your God.” Even literally, regarding a person’s manner of walking, he should take care to walk with modesty, and not in a way of haughtiness or attracting attention. One should not walk conceitedly with his nose raised up, nor hunched over. Neither should he run in public like a madman. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 106-107)

« Last Edit: December 03, 2018, 05:46:13 AM by Noachide »

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #178 on: December 03, 2018, 05:45:33 AM »
From the way a person comports himself, it can be recognized whether he is wise and thoughtful, or mindless and foolish. Thus, Solomon said in his wisdom: “On the road, too, when the fool walks, his mind is empty and he proclaims to all that he is a fool” - i.e., through the emptiness of his personal actions and mannerisms, he informs everyone that he is a fool. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 107)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #179 on: December 03, 2018, 05:47:10 AM »
Just as a person is influenced by his surroundings, so too, every person has influence on others. It is therefore imperative and an obligation for a person to endeavor to have a good effect on the people around him and his society in general, whenever that is possible. One should respect others and guard their honor, and not be cold or indifferent to them, especially when they are in need of positive influence that he can provide. (The converse of this, claiming to be unqualified or unworthy to help when one is really able to do so, is called “false meekness and humility”). (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 109)


Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #180 on: December 04, 2018, 06:24:21 AM »
It is an obligation for every person not to hate others, and it is surely forbidden to hate without reason (e.g., on account of a person’s race). Even if one sees actual wrong in someone’s actions or beliefs, he should not hate that person, but instead should endeavor to return the person to the path that is correct according to Torah. If one tries and is rebuffed, he should nevertheless not have any personal hatred toward the person whom he could not return to the right path. Although it is required to distance oneself from a sinner, so as not to be attracted to his bad ways, one should not harbor any hatred toward him, because hatred is also an evil trait that comes from the evil inclination; it leads to disputes, fighting, bigotry, and many other bad things. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 109)


Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #181 on: December 05, 2018, 05:46:35 AM »
One is, however, obligated to differentiate between people who sin between themselves and God, and do little or no harm to others, versus extremely evil people who cause harm to society and cannot be corrected through any conventional means, such as bringing them to justice or a justified rebuke from the community and its leaders. Those types of evildoers should be hated by as many people as possible, in order that everyone will learn to stay distant from them and from their evil actions. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 109-110)

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #182 on: December 05, 2018, 02:29:08 PM »
Those types of evildoers should be hated by as many people as possible, in order that everyone will learn to stay distant from them and from their evil actions.

Amen. I am sick and tired of hearing that G-d is love and He does not punish or hate.   

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #183 on: December 06, 2018, 03:31:36 AM »
Amen. I am sick and tired of hearing that G-d is love and He does not punish or hate.   
Yes, we can sometimes feel His wrath. It is wrong to teach otherwise. I yearn for times when all people will know G-d and feel only His love.

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #184 on: December 06, 2018, 05:29:52 AM »
When one person wrongs another, the latter should not remain silent. Rather, he should bring it to the attention of the offender and ask him: “Why did you do this to me? Why did you wrong me regarding that matter?” If, afterwards, the person who was at fault asks to be forgiven, he should be forgiven. A person should not harbor ill will and not forgive, as is implied by the verse, “And Abraham prayed to God...”(Genesis 20:17) (to heal Abimelech who had unwittingly wronged him). (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 110)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #185 on: December 07, 2018, 06:37:04 AM »
As explained in The Divine Code, it is an obligation to rebuke a person for sinning in matters that are forbidden by the Noahide Code, if that could convince him to stop. This follows from the Noahide commandment for Gentiles to establish a just and correct society. Whoever has the opportunity to successfully rebuke a sinner but refrains from doing so, is considered responsible for a sin which he could have prevented, if he would have given the rebuke. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 110)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #186 on: December 08, 2018, 06:36:06 AM »
Therefore, it is righteous behavior for a person who sees that his fellow has sinned, or is following an improper path, to attempt to correct his behavior and to inform him that he is causing himself a loss by his bad deeds – as it is stated: “You shall surely admonish your fellow ...”(Leviticus 19:17) This applies whether the sinner is of the same, greater, or lesser stature than the person who gives rebuke. However, one is only obligated to admonish a person with whom he is acquainted. If the wrongdoer is a stranger who will hate him for giving the admonishment, and who may take revenge on him, then one need not admonish this person unless it will surely be accepted. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 110)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #187 on: December 09, 2018, 06:25:54 AM »
A person who rebukes a colleague – whether because of a wrong committed against him, or against another person, or because of a matter between his colleague and God – should rebuke him privately. He should speak to him patiently and gently, informing him that he is only making these statements for his colleague’s own welfare, to help him merit the life of the World to Come. If he accepts the rebuke, it is good; if not, he should rebuke him a second and third time. Indeed, one is obligated to rebuke a colleague who does wrong until the latter strikes him and tells him, “I will not listen,” or a similar statement that implies that he will no longer tolerate being rebuked. When one sees that the sinner is not accepting the rebuke at all, there is no obligation to continue or try harder. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 110-111)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #188 on: December 10, 2018, 05:33:28 AM »
A person who admonishes a colleague should not speak to him harshly until he becomes embarrassed, as the above-cited verse states (in full), “You shall surely admonish your fellow, and [do] not bear a sin because of him;” i.e., do not admonish him in a way that will embarrass him, for you will bear a sin if you cause him that embarrassment. This applies in private, and how much more so is it forbidden to embarrass him in public. By causing embarrassment, not only is one not having any positive effect on the sinner, but it is instead causing the person to sin even more, since he will not accept the rebuke due to the embarrassment he received, and it also causes more conflict. Thus the verse also implies that the one who embarrasses will bear the responsibility for the additional sins that he causes. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 111)

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #189 on: December 11, 2018, 12:33:56 AM »
This applies in private, and how much more so is it forbidden to embarrass him in public.

Unless the one rebuking is a true scholar of human nature, who understands that in this particular situation, it is the correct way to influence him to be better, since each situation and person is different.

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #190 on: December 11, 2018, 04:22:55 AM »
Unless the one rebuking is a true scholar of human nature, who understands that in this particular situation, it is the correct way to influence him to be better, since each situation and person is different.
I would really love to have such a person in my city. But sadly there are no Torah scholars in the place I live. As for rebuking in front of the whole class I think that rabbis rarely use this. Most of them know how sensitive person could be.

Online Hrvatski Noahid

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #191 on: December 11, 2018, 05:12:35 AM »
I would really love to have such a person in my city. But sadly there are no Torah scholars in the place I live. As for rebuking in front of the whole class I think that rabbis rarely use this. Most of them know how sensitive person could be.

There is a Chabad Rabbi in my city. I met him. 

Again, it depends on the situation and the person. You don't use the same language with good men and Jew-hating scum. 

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #192 on: December 11, 2018, 05:56:27 AM »
There is a Chabad Rabbi in my city. I met him. 

Again, it depends on the situation and the person. You don't use the same language with good men and Jew-hating scum.
It is true, you cannot use the same the language with everyone.

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #193 on: December 11, 2018, 06:11:09 AM »
However, in the event that one is wronged by someone who is very boorish or mentally disturbed, it is pious behavior not to admonish the offender or mention the matter at all, and it is better to forgive him totally without bearing any ill feelings. The main concern is that such people will not take correction, and are instead likely to maintain feelings of hate for those who rebuke them. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 111)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #194 on: December 12, 2018, 06:48:39 AM »
From the outset, a person’s wrongdoings should not be publicized. The prohibition of evil gossip and talebearing applies when it is the intention of the gossiper to harm another person’s body or possessions, or to embarrass him with his words, or even when he simply wants to publicize a matter and has pleasure from doing this to denigrate the person whom it is about. It is, however, permissible to relate a prohibited or negative action committed by a person, privately to someone whom it is proper to tell, who will then be able to influence the wayward person to act in a proper way. This sharing of information is only permitted on the condition that it is done in a way which shows that the intention for doing so is only for the good of the wrongdoer. Nevertheless, when an evil person is a danger to others, it is permissible to publicize his evil character and his evil deeds, if the intention is so that other people will be warned about him and will take care not be harmed by him. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 111-112)


Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #195 on: December 13, 2018, 06:35:51 AM »
What was Aaron’s method of pursuing peace? When he saw two people arguing, he would approach each one without the other’s knowledge, and would tell him, “See how your colleague is remorseful and feels bad for sinning against you? He asked me to approach you to ask you to forgive him.” Through Aaron’s method, both colleagues would approach and embrace each other. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 114-115)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #196 on: December 14, 2018, 05:07:17 AM »
How did he love the creatures and draw them close to Torah? When he knew of a person who committed a sin, he would approach him with a pleasant demeanor, greet him and get friendly with him. The sinner would become embarrassed and think to himself, “If this righteous person would know my sinful actions, he would surely distance himself from me, and wouldn’t even look at me or speak to me. But since he must be thinking that I’m an honorable person, I will change my ways in order to be fitting to truly grow close to this righteous person.” In this manner, the sinner would repent and change his ways for the good. Regarding this practice, God says, “In peace and uprightness he [Aaron] went with Me, and he brought back many away from iniquity. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 115)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #197 on: December 15, 2018, 05:45:06 AM »
The gossiper is not the only one who sins when he spreads his words. The one who listens to the gossip commits a greater sin, since he enables and encourages the gossip to be said to him. Therefore it is forbidden to listen to the gossip, unless he perceives that it is crucial to take heed of the information being relayed, and that is why he listens. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 116)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #198 on: December 17, 2018, 06:44:32 AM »
There is a much more serious sin than simple gossip, and that is lashon horah (in Hebrew, translated literally as “evil speech”), i.e., relating negative things about another person. This applies even if the things said about the other person are true, and whether or not the person who is being spoken about is present at the time. If saying something about a person would bring any kind of harm to him or his property, or even if it would only embarrass, annoy, or frighten him if he knew it was said, it is considered to be lashon horah. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 117)

Offline Noachide

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #199 on: December 17, 2018, 06:45:03 AM »
It is forbidden to sit among a gathering of people who regularly relate lashon horah and gossip. If one has the misfortune to be found amongst such a gathering and cannot leave (or cannot be successful in protesting to them to stop the sin they are committing), one should at least not be involved in their talk at all, and not show any approval or satisfaction with this talk, and be steadfast in not accepting that there is truth to any of the gossip being related about other people. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 117)