Author Topic: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge  (Read 5539 times)

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #225 on: January 04, 2019, 07:19:31 AM »
One who gives charity to a poor person should not do so unpleasantly or with his face down. Instead, he should give the charity with a pleasant countenance and cheerfulness, yet commiserating with the poor person troubles – as Job said, “Did I not weep for those who face difficult times; did not my soul feel sorrow for the destitute?” (Job 30:25) This is an attribute of God – as it is stated, “So said [God], the High and Exalted One, … ‘I abide in exaltedness and holiness, but I am with the [people who are] despondent and lowly of spirit, to revive the spirit of the lowly and to revive the heart of the despondent.’ “ (Isaiah 57:15) (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 124)

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #226 on: January 05, 2019, 06:09:57 AM »
If one is asked by a poor person for charity and has nothing to give, he should conciliate him with words. One should not scold a poor person or raise one’s voice against him and shout, because his heart is broken and crushed, and therefore God is with him – as it is stated, “a contrite and broken heart, God, You do not disdain.”(Psalms 51:19) (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 124)

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #227 on: January 06, 2019, 05:51:27 AM »
A pious person who gives charity should not seek to be honored for doing so. It is admirable to give charity secretly, so that the poor recipient will not feel shamed. There is no greater giver of charity than God, Who gives existence to the whole world at every moment, and He does so secretly, hiding His Presence from the mortal recipients of His kindness. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 125)

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #228 on: January 07, 2019, 06:48:05 AM »
The highest level of charity occurs when a person supports someone who has fallen into poverty by giving him a present or a loan that he will use to achieve a steady livelihood. Giving money is not even required, if the poor person is given the advice he needs, or a job or a partnership, that will bring him to be self-sufficient. It is a great merit to help others find work that will sustain them comfortably and honorably. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 125)

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #229 on: January 08, 2019, 06:36:38 AM »
Why is this greater than any other form of charity? A poor person who accepts handouts is embarrassed by doing this, but for one who receives help or a loan that allows him to begin an occupation, he has been saved from falling to that level. Instead, he feels honorable and not disgraced, because he will be able to repay the loan, and he will be supporting himself. Therefore, one who gives help in this manner has not only given charity, but also honor as well, and he does kindness by sparing the recipient from embarrassment and degradation. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 125)


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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #230 on: January 09, 2019, 06:50:32 AM »
Also included in doing this level of charity and kindness is one who finds a successful match between a man and a woman to join in marriage, and then helps them to establish their home. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 125)

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #231 on: January 10, 2019, 05:53:28 AM »
Other traits of kindness that God displayed in the Torah are: clothing the naked (for Adam and Hava), visiting the sick (for Abraham), comforting the bereaved (for Isaac), and burying the dead (for Moses). God also demonstrated the kindness of providing for the needs of a new couple ( Adam and Hava) in their marriage. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 125)

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #232 on: January 11, 2019, 06:21:41 AM »
Inviting guests was a main characteristic and method of kindness displayed by Abraham. He would bring in people who were traveling through the desert, and give them sumptuous food and drink (and accommodations if they needed), and he would then escort them on their way. The following episode teaches that hospitality to guests is a greater spiritual accomplishment than receiving God’s Presence: The Torah relates, “And God appeared to him [Abraham] … and he saw; and behold, three men were standing before him … and he ran toward them [to invite them].”(Genesis 18:1-2) Abraham was sitting in communion with God, yet he asked God to wait for him while he ran to invite the “men” (who were angels in disguise) to be his guests.

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #233 on: January 12, 2019, 06:34:30 AM »
One who escorts a guest who is leaving on his way has done a greater deed than one who has invited him in and fed him. The sages said: “one who does not escort a guest on his way is as if he had shed blood.” The cited measure for escorting is at least four cubits (6-8 feet) outside of the home. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 126)

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #234 on: January 14, 2019, 07:10:44 AM »
The culmination of all one’s good traits is expressed in the trait of doing kindness for others, and it is the correct trait that rises above all the others.

It is a pious trait and a wise path for a person to be merciful and pursue righteousness, and not be overbearing, even towards one’s subordinates. One should not pain them or cause them trouble. The early righteous ones would give their servants a portion of every food they would eat, and would feed their animals and servants before they themselves began to eat. This behavior is in accordance with the verse, “Indeed, as the eyes of servants are turned to the hand of their masters, as the eyes of a maidservant to the hand of her mistress, so are our eyes turned to the Lord our God, until He will be gracious to us. Be gracious to us, Lord, be gracious to us ...” (Psalms 123:2-3) (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 126)

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #235 on: January 14, 2019, 07:11:36 AM »
One should not yell or get angry at one’s subordinates, but should rather speak with them gently and listen to their grievances. Job strived to act in this manner – as it says, “If I ever spurned justice for my servants and maid servants when they contended with me; then what could I do when God would rise up [to examine my ways], and when He would make an accounting of me, what could I answer Him? Did not the One Who made me in the womb make him [my servant] too, and did not One form us both in the womb?” (Job 31:13-15) This surely applies to one’s interaction with other people, and it reflects a trait of God that we should emulate – as it says, “The Lord is good to all, and His mercies are over all His works.” (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 126)

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #236 on: January 15, 2019, 08:37:42 AM »
The sages said, “Similar to the measure that one acts, it is measured to him;” i.e., in the same way a person acts in his own wrongdoings, and in the way he acts toward others, God acts correspondingly toward him. This is said regarding a person’s wrong behavior, and it applies even more so to the corrects behavior of a pious and wise person. One who has mercy on others will receive mercy from God; one who forgives and pardons others will also receive God’s forgiveness and pardon; and one who judges others favorably will be judged favorably. This will be granted to him, measure for measure, even if he retains some wrong tendencies. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 128)

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #237 on: January 16, 2019, 05:54:20 AM »
The sages taught, “One is obligated to say a blessing [to God] over bad tidings, just as he says a blessing over good tidings.” For the truth is that whatever God does in the world is good – as it says, “Is it not from the mouth of the Most High that evil and good emanate?” (Lamentations 3:38) This means that God is always in full control and everything is from Him, and no evil happens. Rather, our perception of an event as bad is only based on our shortsightedness and limited understanding. The truth is that what we perceive as a bad event is in essence a kindness from God, and it is such a powerful good that it cannot be openly revealed, for it cannot yet be grasped by the severely limited ability and frame of reference of our human minds. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 130)

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Re: Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge
« Reply #238 on: January 17, 2019, 06:43:44 AM »
The general nature of tests from God can be divided into two categories: a test of attraction to spiritual evil (a temptation to sin), or a test of physical hardship:

1.A test of spiritual evil comes from one’s evil inclination, which endeavors to make a person sin. Included in this category are a person’s challenges from seeing other individuals sinning, or seeing his general society being engaged in forbidden activities. One is drawn to be like them and joined with them by acting in concert with their sinful ways.

Part of this test comes from the questions: “Why are evil people successful? Why does God hide His face from showing truth and justice in the world? Why does He not grant success to righteous people, or punish and hinder the evildoers?”

Another part of this test is that many people endeavor to attain much honor and riches, yet they do not know how to use these things for good and correct purposes; instead, they use them for negative ends. (Seven Gates of Righteous Knowledge by Rabbi Moshe Weiner and Dr. Michael Schulman, Ask Noah International, 2017, p 130)