Author Topic: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!  (Read 98371 times)

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Offline angryChineseKahanist

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #150 on: July 07, 2010, 01:38:49 PM »


How's the weather where ever you're at?

What are you wearing?
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Offline muman613

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #151 on: July 07, 2010, 02:45:47 PM »


How's the weather where ever you're at?

What are you wearing?


Hey angrychinesekahanist,

The weather here is nice... Here in Silicon Valley it is about 80 degrees and sunny... Not too hot... Im here in the airconditioned office.

What am I wearing? Well, I wear nice navy work pants and a short-sleeve button-down shirt... I also wear an undershirt & tzittzits so it can get hot in here sometimes...


This brings up an interesting Halacha which I learned from an email I received from Torah.org... Let me reproduce it here...



Quote
http://www.torah.org/advanced/weekly-halacha/5770/matos.html?print=1

Question: Is it appropriate to remove one’s tallis katan while playing sports or engaging in strenuous activities that make one hot and sweaty?

Discussion: Some poskim write that it is not appropriate to do so.[1] While it is true that neither Biblical nor Rabbinic law obligates one to wear a tallis katan at all times[2], it has become the accepted custom that every male wears a tallis katan all day long. [3] Rav M. Feinstein rules that since it has become customary to wear a tallis katan all day long, one may no longer deviate from this practice, and one who does so transgresses the dictum of al titosh Toras imecha[4].

      What are the origins of this custom? Why did men choose to be meticulous about donning a tallis katan even when they were not required to do so? The poskim mention two basic reasons: 1) Wearing tzitzis gives us the opportunity to be constantly reminded of our obligations as a Jew, as it is written in Bamidbar (15:39), “That you may see it and remember all the commandments of Hashem and perform them.” [5] 2) The Talmud[6] tells us that wearing a tallis katan serves as protection from “Hashem’s wrath”; when He observes His children performing mitzvos — such as tzitzis — that they are not even obligated to perform, His anger is contained and He views us more favorably. [7]

      It follows, therefore, that no matter the heat or discomfort, one should still be particular not to remove his tallis katan: One constantly needs a reminder of his status as a servant of Hashem, and one should always take advantage of the protection that the tallis katan offers to those who wear it[8].

    There are, however, contemporary poskim who question this ruling. They argue that the mitzvah of tzitzis is only properly fulfilled when one is wearing a garment which benefits him in some way, e.g., it protects or warms him[9]. If, however, the garment does not benefit its wearer in any way, and on the contrary — it makes him uncomfortable or bothers him, then it is possible that the tallis katan no longer falls under the category of a “beged” (a useful garment), and one who wears a useless beged does not fulfill the mitzvah of tzitzis by wearing it[10].



1. Mahri Elgazi, quoted in Tzitz Eliezer 14:49-2; Rav B. Zilber, Yagel Yaakov, pg. 165.
2. The Torah requirement is to place tzitzis on a four-cornered garment when one is wearing such a garment. The Torah, however, does not require that one specifically put on a four-cornered garment so as to be obligated to wear tzitzis; O.C. 24:1.
3. Aruch ha-Shulchan 8:2; Tzitz Eliezer 8:4; Yechaveh Da’as 4:2.
4. Igros Moshe O.C. 4:4; O.C. 5:20-25.
5. O.C. 24:1. See Rambam, Hilchos Tzitzis 3:11.
6. Menachos 41a.
7. See Tosafos, Pesachim 113b, s.v. v’ein, and Gilyon ha-Shas; Rokeiach 331: Kesef Mishneh, Hilchos Tzitzis 3:11.
8. See Halichos Shelomo 1:3, Devar Halachah 25; Tzitz Eliezer 14:49-2.
9. See Koveitz Shiurim, vol. 2, 23:8.
10. Rav Y.S. Elyashiv and Rav C. Kanievsky, quoted in Rivevos Efrayim 7:265 and Yagel Yaakov, pg. 166. See also Ashrei ha-Ish, Tzitzis 2:23, Nezer ha-Chayim, pg. 164, and Doleh U’mashkeh, pg. 27.


And thank you for asking...

I hope that you are doing well this summer and all the blessings of sustenance come your way...

You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

Offline angryChineseKahanist

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #152 on: July 08, 2010, 08:41:03 AM »

Wonderful. Its 103F and humid.
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Offline angryChineseKahanist

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #153 on: July 08, 2010, 08:46:59 AM »

What's the purpose of life?
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Offline ✡ Hindu Zionist ॐ

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #154 on: July 19, 2010, 02:11:48 PM »
didnt knew that u were in silicon valley. There are many indian working there.

and thanks for answering my question. Now i know what dr. dan has in his profile.

my next question, can you tell me something about the applying of ash ritual of red heifer. and Are there any red heifers in israel?

Offline ✡ Hindu Zionist ॐ

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #155 on: July 30, 2010, 12:27:13 AM »
you seem very busy these days muman, but i would like to ask one more question, cud have asked someone else, but your answers are always in detail as you mention many references.

Is there any significance of Asherah or sometimes refered to as Hebrew or Mother Goddess. She is viewed in positive light by Jews?

Offline muman613

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #156 on: July 30, 2010, 01:39:20 AM »
you seem very busy these days muman, but i would like to ask one more question, cud have asked someone else, but your answers are always in detail as you mention many references.

Is there any significance of Asherah or sometimes refered to as Hebrew or Mother Goddess. She is viewed in positive light by Jews?

Hindu Zionist,

I am not exactly sure what you refer to about 'mother goddess' we have no such idea in Judaism.

As far as the Jewish concept of Asherah we are forbidden to plant any tree in the courtyard of the altar for Hashem...

Here is some info:

http://www.vbm-torah.org/Parasha.62/43shoftim.htm
NOTE: Stupid filter changes *p*a*r*s*h*a to *p*a*r*a*s*h*a... I wish they would remove this stupid filter because every time I post a link to this site the filter always mangles the URL...

Quote
The Prohibitions of "Ashera" and "Matzeva"

By Rav Mordechai Sabato

 

You shall not plant for yourself an "ashera," any tree next to the altar of the Lord your G-d that you shall make for yourself.

Nor shall you erect for yourself a "matzeva" (pillar), which the Lord your G-d hates. (Devarim 16:21-22)

In this shiur we shall examine the significance of these two prohibitions and their reason. Let us first clarify the location of these verses in their broader context.

VERSES THAT SEEM OUT OF PLACE

Parashat Shoftim opens with a command to appoint judges and court officers; this topic is covered in chapter 16, verses 18-20. The subject of law and judges is discussed again in chapter 17, verses 8-13. In the first section the Torah commands that judges be appointed "in all of your gates." The second section emphasizes the role of the kohanim and the judge who are to be found "in the place that G-d will choose" as a court that rules in matters of doubt that arise "in your gates." Hence the Torah prescribes a legal system that consists of two circles. The outer circle involves the establishment of courts in "all of your gates," while the inner circle describes a court that is located in the "place that G-d will choose" (i.e. the Temple), which serves as the final arbiter in all matters of doubt arising in the courts that are "in your gates." It is this court that Chazal refer to by the name "Beit Din ha-Gadol" – the High Court.

Between these two sections, which are strongly related to one another, we find a few verses whose connection with the subject of law is unclear. These verses may be divided into three sections:

16:21-22 – the prohibitions of ashera and matzeva;

17:1 – prohibition of sacrificing a blemished animal;

17:2-7 – what is to be done with an idolater.

The location of these verses, right between two sections dealing with law and judges, requires explanation.

Moreover, these sections would seem to fit better into other locations altogether in Sefer Devarim.

a) The section on the idolater would seem better suited to chapter 13 (after verse 1), which deals with the punishments of those who instigate idolatry and a city that is wholly involved in idolatry.

b) The prohibitions of ashera and matzeva are also well suited to the concluding verses of chapter 12 and the opening of chapter 13, where the Torah forbids us to learn ways of Divine service from the other nations. For example, the Torah mentions one of their practices, child sacrifice - a form of worship that the Torah defines as something "abominable to G-d, that He hates." This expression, "that He hates," appears again in the prohibitions of the ashera and matzeva (it appears nowhere else in the Torah), and obviously the connection is that here too we are forbidden to serve G-d in the wrong way.

c) Chapter 17, verse 1 also mentions a form of service that is unacceptable: the sacrifice of a blemished animal, which is also defined as "an abomination to G-d."

Thus we find that all the verses dividing the two sections in our parasha pertaining to the legal system could be interposed between 13:1 and 13:2. The first two sections (16:21–17:1) would relate to the previous subject, forbidden forms of Divine service, while the third section (17:2-7) would begin the next section – idolatry.

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE PROHIBITIONS OF ASHERA AND MATZEVA

Let us leave aside for the moment the question of the location of these verses, and turn our attention to the significance of the prohibitions of ashera and matzeva.

The stylistic similarity between the wording of the two prohibitions would appear to point to a thematic similarity between them as well. I would like to propose an explanation of these two prohibitions that takes this similarity into account.

"You shall not plant for yourself an ashera, any tree next to the altar of the Lord your G-d that you shall make for yourself." What exactly is this ashera, and what is a person's intention in planting it next to the altar of G-d?

Let us first clarify the meanings of the word ashera in the Tanakh. This word is mentioned in two different contexts: in most instances it refers to a tree, as we understand from our verse. But in Melakhim I 18:19, we find the expression "prophets of the Ashera," parallel to the expression "prophets of the Ba'al," and hence we conclude that Ashera is the name of a goddess, just as Ba'al is the name of a G-d. Elsewhere (Melakhim II 23:4) we find, "And the king commanded Chilkiyahu the Kohen Gadol, and the secondary kohanim, and the gatekeepers, to remove from G-d's Temple all the vessels made for Ba'al and for Ashera and for all the host of the heavens, and he burned them outside Jerusalem…" From here, too, we learn that Ashera was the name of a goddess.

This explanation fits in with what we glean from ancient Near Eastern literature: Ashera is the name of a well-known goddess in the Canaanite pantheon, whose status in some respect is parallel to that of Ba'al.

What is the relationship between the two contexts of this name in Tanakh - the name of a Canaanite goddess, and a tree that serves as a religious object, and is planted next to the altar?

Perhaps we should adopt the view that this tree represented in Canaanite culture the presence of this goddess. Its placement next to the altar signified the goddess to whom the sacrifices were offered.

We may assume that the function of the matzeva, a pillar or monument, in Canaanite worship should be explained in a similar manner. In two places we find the expression "matzeva of the Ba'al" (Melakhim II 3:2, and 10:27). It seems, therefore, that just as the tree called ashera expressed, in idolatrous worship, the presence of the goddess Ashera, so the matzeva of the Ba'al expressed the presence of the G-d Ba'al. Both were located next to the altar to symbolize the gods to whom the sacrifices were offered.

According to the literal reading, the prohibitions of ashera and matzeva are not prohibitions of idolatry itself, but rather of imitating the ways of the nations in our service of G-d. Likewise, the wording of the verse, "that He hates," implies that there is something intrinsically wrong with these forms of worship, just as there is a moral flaw in child sacrifice, concerning which we are similarly commanded, "that He hates."

Let us now combine these observations to propose a broader interpretation of the text. The Torah addresses the Jew who wishes to worship G-d and believes that he would do well to convert the practices of the nations into a form of Divine worship, as it is written, "How do these nations serve their gods? Let me do the same." This person believes that in order to emphasize and publicize the fact that he is sacrificing to G-d, he should ensure that he has something like an ashera and a matzeva – but in a sense that is appropriate for Divine service. Thus the ashera and matzeva, which in Canaanite worship symbolized the Canaanite gods, would now symbolize the presence of G-d.

This is precisely the direction of thought that the Torah wishes to negate. These objects and this view are what are described in the Torah as what "G-d hates."

The intrinsic defect in this way of thinking lies in the effort to attach an image to G-d, even if only through imitation. The root of this prohibition is to be found in the following verse:

You shall guard your souls carefully, for you did not see any image on the day that the Lord your G-d spoke to you at Chorev from amidst the fire; lest you become corrupt and make for yourselves a sculpture, an image of any symbol. (Devarim 4:16)

Thus, we are forbidden to erect objects even if they are meant to represent only the presence of G-d, as it were, and not G-d Himself, and even if this action is meant to indicate to Whom we are offering our sacrifices. The importance of the abstract conception of G-d does not allow for any compromise in this matter.

Hence we may even propose an explafor the fact that during the period of the patriarchs Avraham, Yitzchak and Yaakov, a matzeva was beloved to G-d (as evidenced by Yaakov's erection of a matzeva at Beit El), while later on it became something hateful. In explaining this, we shall adopt a principle laid down by Rav S.R. Hirsch (Bereishit 28:18) and Rav A.Y. Kook (Iggerot 3:10, #746), namely, that there is a difference between worship of G-d during the period of the Patriarchs and His worship by their descendants. The role of the Patriarchs was to publicize the Name of G-d in the world, and to emphasize His presence. At this stage, the need of the hour was specifically to emphasize G-d's presence in the world, even utilizing objects that represented His presence symbolically. At a later stage, after the Name of G-d became known in the world, it became important that specifically the abstract dimension of the G-d of Israel be emphasized, and therefore ashera and matzeva were prohibited.

In contrast to the matzeva, we find no evidence that the Patriarchs planted an ashera. Indeed, Chazal (Sifrei, Devarim 146) mention only the matzeva that was first beloved, while the ashera was hateful even during the period of the Patriarchs. But since the Torah juxtaposes these two phenomena, it is appropriate that we clarify whether some positive phenomenon involving the ashera is not also to be found among the Patriarchs.

In this context we must consider what we are told of Avraham: "And he planted a tree ('eshel') in Be'er Sheva, and he called there in the Name of the Lord, the eternal G-d" (Bereishit 21:33). The literal meaning of the text seems to indicate a connection between the tree and the calling in G-d's Name. It is therefore likely that the planting of the tree was meant to indicate the sanctity of the place, as an expression of G-d's presence.

We may now give new significance to Rashi's comment (following the example of Chazal) that "although [the matzeva] had been beloved to Him during the time of the Patriarchs, He now hated it – because it had become a standard for idolatrous worship." During the time of the Patriarchs, the matzeva (and perhaps even also the parallel to the ashera – i.e., the "eshel") had been a beloved symbol, since its function was only to symbolize the presence of G-d in the world, and to publicize His Name. It had not been meant in any sense as an embodiment of G-d. But after the nations made it a standard for idolatrous practices – i.e., after they regarded it as an embodiment of divinity – then it became hateful to G-d.

THE LOCATION OF THE PROHIBITIONS

Let us now return to our original question. Why does the Torah locate the verses dealing with the ashera, matzeva and the blemished animal – as well as the law pertaining to the individual idolater – in between the two sections dealing with law and legal courts?

Concerning the idolater, the answer appears simple: the Torah wishes to illustrate the role of the judge in the most important task of all – obliteration of idolatry, and to emphasize the way he is to convict: "The person shall die at the word of two witnesses or three witnesses; he shall not die at the word of a single witness." Support for this view may be found in the fact that no similar verse is to be found in the three other sections in chapter 13 that deal with the laws of instigators and followers in the paths of idolatry.


What of the three prohibitions that seem out of place? What is common to the ashera, matzeva and the blemished animal is the altar. An ashera cannot be planted, nor a matzeva erected, next to the altar, and a blemished animal is not to be offered upon it. The Torah juxtaposes the laws of the court to the laws of the altar, thereby indicating that both have a single source. The G-d before Whom you stand, in approaching the altar, is the same G-d before Whom the judges and the litigants stand: "And the two people who have an argument shall both stand before G-d and before the kohanim and the judges that shall be in those days" (Devarim 19:17). A hint to this may be found in the fact that the High Court is located in the Temple complex, as well as in the fact that the Torah takes pains to note that in addition to the judge, one is also obliged to listen to "the kohen who stands to serve the Lord your G-d there." Since judgment belongs to G-d, His word may be heard via the kohen who stands serving G-d at that place. (Rav D.Z. Hoffmann also notes that in Shemot 20:24ff there appear laws related to the altar, followed by Parashat Mishpatim, relating to civil law to be applied by judges.)

This explanation may also clarify the juxtaposition of the laws of the perversion of justice with the laws of the perversion of the altar. Just as we are to maintain the purity of the altar, not involving it in elements aimed at embodying G-d and corrupting our faith, so we are to take care to maintain the purity of law, not to pervert it and turn it into injustice. The purity of law and the purity of the altar are both nourished from the same source. "Zion shall be redeemed in justice" (Yeshayahu 1:27).


Obviously the Torah abhors Idol worship and 'Ashera' is a form of idol worship...

Quote
http://www.milknhoney.co.il/torah/tazria.html

Many archeologists have noticed that ancient religions of Canaan have birth rights. These ancient religions did much more than just giving a box of chocolates to the new mother. Entire cults surrounded mysterious pagan gods who ruled over reproduction. A new mother might have been considered close to the G-d who had been instrumental in her bearing a child. Such women might be brought to the local temple dedicated to the goddess Anath or perhaps to Ashtarte - Ashtarte.

The new born child might be ritually passed through a fire as a dedication to the Molech. All this and much more were practices of the non-Jewish residents of Canaan and the whole Middle East. These pagan beliefs were active in connection to anything to do with reproduction. They designated special powers to seed, menstruation and birth.

The birth of a child was considered to have been assisted by certain gods or spirits. A favorite goddess was Ashera. This would arouse opposing gods and spirits who seek vengeance against their enemy. An opposing G-d might be Mot.

The mother and the baby alike required special magical protection from these demons. Appeasements of the gods or the demons might be required. Some might ask for protection from the deity who had been instrumental in bringing the child to its birth. If a daughter was born she would need even more protection. The reason for this is that a baby girl herself can potentially have her own children.

Needless to say all of this is totally unacceptable to the Jews who follow the monotheistic teaching of the Torah. Some might wrongly claim that our Perasha is proof that the Torah teaches us that such stupid beliefs are embraced by the Torah.

To begin with our Perasha starts out by totally excluding a woman from the Biet Hamikdash. For a period of 40 days after the birth of a boy and 60 days following the more powerful female birth the new mother may not even enter. This is a purification for the temple which excludes such pagan beliefs from walking in. After this time period has finished a woman may only enter the Beit Hamikdash after she brings a sin offering. Only after this long period has been completed can she participate in other Jewish rituals.

This whole process demonstrates opposition to polytheistic rituals. These rituals can be seen in Ugaritic mythology. The Ugurits immediately predate Avraham Avinu. They had a special affinity for fertility. Their fertility cults would have celebrations in front of idols which represented their gods and goddesses. They would demonstrate human procreation and the drama of giving birth at these celebrations.

This is totally rejected by the Torah. Since we believe that only G-d is the source of every blessing in the world. G-d is not ruled by natural processes, demons or anything else. Such ideas were the most revolutionary of the time.
« Last Edit: July 30, 2010, 01:47:09 AM by muman613 »
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

Offline The One and Only Mo

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #157 on: August 02, 2010, 07:48:02 AM »
Dear Muman,

    How do you deal with an angry, bitter  forum member who constantly attacks you for no reason at all and accuses you of things that he can't even provide evidence for?

Offline ✡ Hindu Zionist ॐ

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #158 on: August 02, 2010, 08:22:33 AM »
great info. But still awaiting the first one to be answered

Offline muman613

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #159 on: August 02, 2010, 10:03:36 PM »
great info. But still awaiting the first one to be answered

You mean about the Red cow? Didn't I already discuss the red cow when it was the Torah portion a month or two ago? I believe what I found was that the red cow which they thought would be able to be used turned out to not be halachically usable due to the presence of more than two {or two} non-red hairs.

Otherwise I don't know of any other red cow which has been discovered which could be used for the purification from the contamination from the dead {Tumah HaMeit}.

Here is an article which does discuss some of your questions:

http://ohr.edu/ask_db/ask_main.php/156/Q1/

Quote
Topic: Cow, Red, Significance

Here are but a sample of many questions that our readers have recently sent to "Ask the Rabbi" about the apparent discovery of a Red Heifer in Israel:

B. H. Moore from Spokane Washington wrote:

    The National news media reported that a red heifer was born in Israel which has some bearing on the future Temple.
    Could you explain the significance of this?


Fábio, Alexandre, Juliano, Rafael and Mariángela from Brazil wrote:

    Please, we want to know about the red cow that was born in Kfar Hassidim, and the connection with the restoration of the Temple and the Meshiah. Thank you.

David Waysman from Australia wrote:

    We have seen reports of what may be a Para Aduma. Is there any basis to this claim, & if yes, what may be the implications of the existence of a Red Heifer.

Peter Crowson from Live Oak, California wrote:

    What is the significance of the red heifer. How was it different from all the other sacrifices?

Mitch Klausner wrote:

    In the Boston Globe a few weeks ago, on the front page of the Sunday edition was a picture of a red heifer found in Israel. Apparently it is very rare to find such an animal. The article said that some believe this means Mashiach is coming soon. Is there any reason to believe this? Thank you in advance.


Lou Brifman wrote:

    Dear Rabbi,

    Please discuss the Parah Adumah and its significance today.


The Farber Family from South Africa wrote:

    Would you please explain to us the significance of a "Red Heifer" born in Yerushalayim?

Lester from Pampa, Texas wrote:

    Dear Rabbi,

    What about the flawless Red Heifer?


Dear Readers,

As rare as it may be, the birth of a red heifer is nothing more than a curiosity. There is no source in Jewish tradition that sees the birth of a red heifer as a sign of the arrival of the Mashiach.

According to the Torah, someone who comes into contact with a dead body becomes halachically 'impure.' The Torah describes a very specific process that enables a person to purify himself. This process involves slaughtering a heifer which is completely red, burning it and mixing its ashes with water. Some of this 'purifying water' is sprinkled on the impure person twice over a seven-day period.

This had great practical importance during Temple times, because all participants in the Temple service needed to be ritually pure, and the entire nation needed to purify themselves for the Passover, Shavuot, and Sukkot festivals. It will have practical significance again when the Temple is rebuilt.

Maimonides writes that from the time of Moses until the destruction of the Second Temple, only nine red heifers have been used to prepare the 'purifying waters.' The tenth red heifer, says Maimonides, will be prepared by the Mashiach.

This can be easily misunderstood. It does not mean that there existed only nine red heifers in history, and that the tenth one to be born will be used by the Mashiach. It simply means that the ashes from each heifer lasted a long time, and there was never a need to prepare more than nine. The tenth red heifer process will take place in the times of the Mashiach.

About twenty years ago, a red heifer born in Israel caused a similar stir. Rabbi Moshe Feinstein, the noted halachic authority of the time, was unmoved. "One of the requirements of the red heifer is that it be at least two years old. What if the Mashiach were to come tomorrow? Would we have to wait two years in order to become pure? When Mashiach comes, they'll find a red heifer that's two-years old."

The reason for the commandment of the red heifer is considered the deepest secret in the Torah. So much so that even King Solomon, the wisest scholar who ever lived, was unable to fathom its deep meaning. According to the Midrash, its meaning will be revealed in the era of the Mashiach.

Sources:

    * Bamidbar (Numbers) 19
    * Mishna Parah 3:5
    * Rambam, ibid. 3:4
    * Bamidbar Rabba 19:4

There is some discussion of the red heifer in the Torah section of JTF @ http://jtf.org/forum_english/index.php/topic,47317.0.html

Also see my 'Drash' on the Parasha of Chukat @ http://jtf.org/forum_english/index.php/topic,47019.0.html
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

Offline muman613

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #160 on: September 02, 2010, 01:31:36 AM »
I'd like to thank everyone for a memorable year here at JTF...

Anyone whom I have offended please accept my apology, unless you are a troll in which case I meant to offend you.

Because it is less than a week till Rosh Hashanah I would like to rectify any problems which I participated in.

My prayers and my complete intention is that this coming year will be one of reversal. We should witness a reversal of the insane edicts which the leaders of the 'nations' impose on the Jewish people in our land. We should witness a reversal of the ill fortunes which have befallen America because of the sour policies of the Obama administration. May Hashem grant us the merit to witness the reversal of nature, to see the punishment of the wicked and the reward for the righteous.

And may JTF continue to grow in righteous membership, with a strong desire to see the flourishing of the Jewish people in the land which Hashem promised our forefathers. Let the toil of JTF sow the beginnings of the coming of the awaited Moshiach.

You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

Offline Meerkat

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #161 on: September 11, 2010, 11:15:12 PM »
do you think israel should blast the 2 mosques on the har habayet and rebuild the temple?

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #162 on: September 12, 2010, 04:50:19 PM »
do you think israel should blast the 2 mosques on the har habayet and rebuild the temple?

"If I had my way, I would tear this whole building down!", Samson & Deliah (Grateful Dead) http://www.lyricsfreak.com/g/grateful+dead/samson+delilah_20062473.html

I believe that the time will come when we will have to remove the mosques on the Temple mount. I don't know if the time is right now, considering that we need to do a lot to resume the services of the Third Temple. Over Rosh Hashana we discussed this, the Temple Institute and its preparations of the utensils and the priestly garments...

I hope that the time will be right for this soon. We need more Jews who are concerned about this. The importance of the desire to rebuild the Temple is incredible. Once the desire to do this increases then Hashem will do his part and allow this to happen.

Let us merit to witness the rebuilding of the Temple and the light of Moshiach...

You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

Offline angryChineseKahanist

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #163 on: September 22, 2010, 01:08:26 PM »
I'd like to thank everyone for a memorable year here at JTF...

Anyone whom I have offended please accept my apology, unless you are a troll in which case I meant to offend you.

Because it is less than a week till Rosh Hashanah I would like to rectify any problems which I participated in.

My prayers and my complete intention is that this coming year will be one of reversal. We should witness a reversal of the insane edicts which the leaders of the 'nations' impose on the Jewish people in our land. We should witness a reversal of the ill fortunes which have befallen America because of the sour policies of the Obama administration. May Hashem grant us the merit to witness the reversal of nature, to see the punishment of the wicked and the reward for the righteous.

And may JTF continue to grow in righteous membership, with a strong desire to see the flourishing of the Jewish people in the land which Hashem promised our forefathers. Let the toil of JTF sow the beginnings of the coming of the awaited Moshiach.



Huh? Where are you going?


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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #164 on: September 22, 2010, 05:02:55 PM »
I'd like to thank everyone for a memorable year here at JTF...

Anyone whom I have offended please accept my apology, unless you are a troll in which case I meant to offend you.

Because it is less than a week till Rosh Hashanah I would like to rectify any problems which I participated in.

My prayers and my complete intention is that this coming year will be one of reversal. We should witness a reversal of the insane edicts which the leaders of the 'nations' impose on the Jewish people in our land. We should witness a reversal of the ill fortunes which have befallen America because of the sour policies of the Obama administration. May Hashem grant us the merit to witness the reversal of nature, to see the punishment of the wicked and the reward for the righteous.

And may JTF continue to grow in righteous membership, with a strong desire to see the flourishing of the Jewish people in the land which Hashem promised our forefathers. Let the toil of JTF sow the beginnings of the coming of the awaited Moshiach.



Huh? Where are you going?




Shalom ACK,

I am hopefully not going anywhere, only forward toward good things.

What I wrote there are my Rosh Hashanah/New Year wishes for the forum. For the last two weeks the Jewish people are celebrating the High Holidays. This time is a time of asking forgiveness, giving forgiveness and atoning for the sins which we committed against G-d.

The start of my year has been good so far. Even during this time of hardship in this country I am 'lucky' enough to get a call from a 'Head-Hunter' who thought I could fill a Web Developer job they were looking to fill. Unfortunately they would probably not pay what I am currently getting, and the job is out in Arizona and I live in California. But it is a good sign that my livelihood is being taken care of for me by Hashem, Blessed is He.

I hope that every JTF member has a good year, as I do for Jews and gentiles alike. Tonight we begin the Jewish holiday of Sukkot, when we eat and relax in booths which we build in our yards.

You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

Offline Rubystars

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #165 on: September 26, 2010, 11:35:56 AM »
How do apartment dwellers celebrate sukkot? Do they make tents inside their apartments?

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #166 on: September 26, 2010, 11:43:23 AM »
How do apartment dwellers celebrate sukkot? Do they make tents inside their apartments?

Shalom Rubystars,

Thank you for asking... I will tell you what my experience is, and what I understand is the halacha.

First off, one cannot construct a Sukkut inside or under any obstruction between the roof of the sukkot and the sky. One cannot build a sukkot under a tree which blocks the light from the sun. A sukkot is supposed to have a roof made of Skach, or basically plant material {like palm fronds, bamboo, etc.} which allows more light than shade into the sukkot.

What I have heard that they do in Israel is that most apartments have special balconies which don't have balconies right above them, so that there is no obstruction between the roof of the sukkot and the sky. I think that those apartments are advertised as having sukkot balconies.

Here is some important information which I found on the internet:

http://www.beingjewish.com/yomtov/sukkos/build.html

Quote
A sukkah, to be valid according to Jewish Law, must have a minimum of two long walls and one short wall, and a doorway (either with or without an actual door) in that short wall. However, I have never seen a sukkah built that way. As I said above, every sukkah I have ever seen has always had four walls, and sometimes the fourth wall is the wall of a house. (A sukkah can also be built between two houses, where two of the sukkah walls are the walls of the houses. However, you have to be careful that there are no eaves hanging over the sukkah from the tops of the walls, or the sukkah could become invalid. See below.)

The "roofing" (called s'chach in Hebrew -- one of the more difficult words to pronounce in the Hebrew language, to be sure) of the sukkah has some very strict rules. It must be made of pieces of vegetation. Any kind of vegetation is permissible. Bamboo used to be very popular, so were bulrushes. Leaves of any tree are acceptable, as long as they have been completely severed from the ground before they are placed on top of your sukkah. I have seen some people use loose slats of wood.

Each piece of vegetation for the s'chach must not be too wide. An inch or two is fine. Some light must also be able to enter between each piece. The length of the s'chach does not matter.

The s'chach must cast more shade than sun into the sukkah, yet still leave it possible to see some sky between the pieces. In this way, we rely on Hashem, not on a roof.

These days, someone has invented a special type of mat that may be used as s'chach. Please keep in mind that not every mat is permitted. It has to be constructed according to very specific Jewish Laws. If you can get hold of those mats made properly, or if you know how to make them yourself, according to Jewish Law, I can personally testify that they are usually much easier to use.

The s'chach may not lay directly on top of metal, or on top of any wood that has been shaped into a vessel that can hold water. In other words the beams that support the s'chach, or the top of your walls that support the s'chach, may not be made of metal. The walls may be made of metal, and then covered with flat pieces of wood or with canvas or another firm material, and the pieces of s'chach may be laid on top of that. The s'chach may not touch the metal beneath it.

The s'chach may not lay directly on top of wood that has been carved into a concave shape. It may be only flat pieces of wood (or material may cover it).

The s'chach may not be tightly secured. This means that the s'chach may not be nailed down, nor tied down too tightly (and not every type of string may be used). You may pile pieces of wood that are also valid as s'chach over the s'chach to weigh it down and keep it in place. You may bang a nail at each side of the s'chach, not to support the s'chach, but to prevent the pieces of s'chach from rolling off. You may build the walls higher than the s'chach. But you may not nail the s'chach down in any way.

If you do wish to tie down the s'chach, you may use only a simple string that is not constructed of twisted strings, and you must tie it loosely. I am told that butcher's string qualifies (but I haven't checked it myself).

If you keep your sukkah intact all year-round, you must remove and replace the s'chach within thirty days before the Sukkos Holiday begins, so that the sukkah is not a permanent fixture. The sukkah must be a temporary dwelling, in which we live for the Holiday. We give up our permanent dwelling for a temporary one, to fulfill the will of Hashem. It is not necessary to comepletely remove the s'chach. It is sufficient to lift each piece up a foot or more into the air, and then put it back down. You can do this with many pieces at a time, as long as they are all replaced by hand, with the intention to fulfill the Mitzvah of Sukkah. Just before you do this, you should say, "L'shaim Mitzvas Sukkah --- For the purpose of the Commandment of Sukkah."

Some construction advice for building larger sukkos: You want the s'chach to be held up without fear of them caving in. You might lay a few two-by-fours across the width of the sukkah. Nail those two-by-fours to the walls of the sukkah, or to posts attached to the walls. (Nailing down the beams is permitted because they will not be used as the s'chach.) You would then lay the s'chach over those two-by-fours. If necessary, lay some two-by-fours across the boards, and then place the pieces of s'chach over the upper ones.

A Sukkah must be outdoors, under the sky. There can be no tree or part of a tree above the Sukkah. Any part of a Sukkah that is beneath anything else is invalid. If there is anything above the sukkah, every part underneath is not sukkah. A very common example is a tree that has branches and leaves leaning over part of a sukkah. The part underneath the leaves and branches is invalid. To eat inside the sukkah that is partly underneath a tree, you must sit in a part of the sukkah that is not underneath anything else.

It is permitted to build a sukkah under a retractable roof. Lots of people have a roof on tracks, and they just roll the roof away, which leaves the sukkah below (with its s'chach on, of course) open to the sky. Whenever it rains, they simply move the roof back over the sukkah.

Many sukkos are built against the wall of a house. But often there is an eave, or a gutter, that leans over the edge of the roof, and thus is over that side of the house. Underneath that eave or gutter the sukkoh is not kosher. This means that the sukkah actually starts a foot or two away from the wall. In that situation, the other three walls are absolutely necessary.

And if you want to build your sukkah on a balcony or porch, and there is another balcony or porch directly above yours, you cannot build a sukkah beneath that balcony, or underneath anything else.

Jewish women are not commanded to eat in a sukkah, because it is a time-bound Mitzvah. In general, with some exceptions, women are not obligated to perform most time-bound Mitzvos. (Their primary focus is on the cycles of their own personal self and how their responsibilities radiate outward, while men's focus is on factors that control them from outside themselves and attempt to make those responsibilities penetrate inwards. Of course, there is a great deal of overlap between the two necessary approaches. At any rate, this my explanation of the concept. It may be completely wrong.) A woman is therefore not obligated to eat in a sukkah. Before you email me about this, please read "On Equality," by my wife, Kressel Housman, in which she discusses women's role in the Torah's Commandments.

A woman may, if she so chooses, eat in the house during the entire Holiday of Sukkos, if she wishes. Unlike a man, she suffers no loss of personal holiness by eating outside a sukkah during Sukkos. Of course if she chooses to eat in a sukkah she receives reward in Heaven for doing so, and receives holiness from performing this Mitzvah. And if she eats in a sukkah, the Ashkenazi Custom is that she says the proper Brachah (Blessing).

(Incidentally, while there are important reasons that a woman is not required to do many of the Commandments that a man is required to do, and they would be too complicated to go into here, it can be surmised that a woman does not need to do the Mitzvah of Sukkah because in a sense she herself is a sukkah. In many ways, a woman encompasses the Mitzvos she does. One obvious example is how she encompasses a Jewish child before it is born, and thus instills within it the inherent holiness every Jew has. A man does not have the power either to encompass and protect that way, nor to impart that same level of holiness. This is why the home is the mother's province, in shoring up and strengthening that which encompasses and protects a person, not just physically from the elements, but also spiritually. Through what the mother does, the child develops the deeper spiritual (and emotional) attachment to Judaism that he will always look back at for the rest of his life. That is the true desire of the Jew to "return to the womb." As such, the Jewish woman is herself a sort of sukkah, and does not need to fulfill the spiritual aspects of sukkah by sitting in a sukkah.)

Most people have the custom of beautifying the Mitzvah by attaching nice signs to the walls. (This is not necessary, just a way of beautifying the Mitzvah.) The signs must convey the decorum necessary for a sukkah, and should depict some holy aspect of Judaism. Generally, the signs will have words from the Torah about the Holiday, some of the prayers recited in the sukkah, pictures of Rabbis, or pictures of Jewish sites in Israel, or Jewish practices from around the year. These should be treated with respect, and packed away carefully during the rest of the year.

The most widespread practice is to hang decorations on the walls, and many also hang some from the beams supporting the s'chach, or from the s'chach itself. Pre-school and nursery-grade children will usually bring home from their Jewish dayschool or daycare center some decorations they made in school. It will make your child proud and happy if you hang them up in your sukkah. Since one of the Commandments of the Holiday is to rejoice, why not give your children an extra reason to rejoice as well?

Since a Sukkah is a holy place, we must conduct ourselves, while in the Sukkah, with an extra level of holiness and caution. And it should help us consider the value of always conducting ourselves that way. Most importantly, we must bear in mind, as we make the Blessing in the sukkah, and as we eat, that we are thanking Hashem for taking us out of Egypt and miraculously protecting our ancestors in the Sinai Desert.

http://www.akhlah.com/holidays/sukkot/sukkot_traditions.php

Quote
In Israel, many people live in apartment buildings. If you live in an apartment, where can you put your Sukkah? Well, many Israelis put theirs on their balconies. Some make a Sukkah for the entire apartment building to share. During Sukkot in Israel, you can drive around and look at the buildings-almost every one has at least one Sukkah.
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

Offline Rubystars

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #167 on: September 26, 2010, 11:52:58 AM »
Thanks Muman. I was curious because I know there are many, many Jewish condo or apartment dwellers, and it's hard for me to imagine how a busy lawyer or on-call doctor or anyone else can take the time out to go to a different place where they can build the sukkot outside. I was kind of curious on how they do this.

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #168 on: September 26, 2010, 02:08:09 PM »
Thanks Muman. I was curious because I know there are many, many Jewish condo or apartment dwellers, and it's hard for me to imagine how a busy lawyer or on-call doctor or anyone else can take the time out to go to a different place where they can build the sukkot outside. I was kind of curious on how they do this.

I often go to my local shul, as I did this morning to shake my lulav and etrog... Every Synagogue should have a sukkot on the grounds for the members to fulfill the mitzvot of Sukkot.
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

Offline Rubystars

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #169 on: September 26, 2010, 03:37:07 PM »
Thanks Muman. I was curious because I know there are many, many Jewish condo or apartment dwellers, and it's hard for me to imagine how a busy lawyer or on-call doctor or anyone else can take the time out to go to a different place where they can build the sukkot outside. I was kind of curious on how they do this.

I often go to my local shul, as I did this morning to shake my lulav and etrog... Every Synagogue should have a sukkot on the grounds for the members to fulfill the mitzvot of Sukkot.

Oh ok cool thanks for telling me.

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #170 on: September 26, 2010, 09:44:32 PM »
speaking of on-call doctors....
if a heart surgeon is an observant jew, does he get out in the middle of sukkot or sabbath?
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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #171 on: September 26, 2010, 11:09:12 PM »
speaking of on-call doctors....
if a heart surgeon is an observant jew, does he get out in the middle of sukkot or sabbath?


Well, I guess you are talking about situations which involve saving someones life...

Yes, in all cases saving a persons life over-rides any obligation to do mitzvahs, even including violating Shabbat and Yom Tov {Holidays}.

It is called Pikuei Nefesh and it is a halachic law the says that because Torah commands us to LIVE by the mitzvot, they should never come to cause a Jew/Human to die {through trying to observe the mitzvot}.

Let me find a good reference to this topic:

Quote
http://www.mechon-mamre.org/jewfaq/death.htm
Of the 613 commandments, only the prohibitions against murder, idolatry, incest and adultery are so important that they cannot be violated to save a life.  Judaism not only permits, but often requires a person to violate the commandments if necessary to save a life.  A person who is extremely ill, for example, or a woman in labor, is not permitted to fast on Yom Kippur, because fasting at such a time would endanger the person's life.  Doctors are permitted to answer emergency calls on the Sabbath, even though this may violate many Sabbath prohibitions.  Abortions where necessary to save the life of a mother are mandatory (the unborn are not considered human life in Jewish law, thus the mother's human life overrides).

Quote
http://www.aish.com/jl/i/mn/48932567.html
Physicians' Decisions

With the exception of the three cardinal sins, one must violate any religious law to save a life, as the Torah states, "Keep My decrees and laws, since a person can [truly] live only by keeping them" (Leviticus 18:5) -- live by keeping them and not die by keeping them.

Although keeping the Sabbath is considered a foundation of our religion, it may be violated in any manner necessary to save a life. In such a case, it is a meritorious deed to violate the Sabbath, and one who hesitates is guilty of bloodshed.

Where the Sabbath is violated in a case of danger, it must be done by responsible adults, and not by children or non-Jews, even where possible. However, if it is possible to avoid violating the Sabbath without causing any delay, it is permissible to do so.

Similarly, a dangerously sick or starving person may eat any forbidden food necessary to preserve his life. In such a case, all is permitted, even pork products, and bread on Passover.

Although Yom Kippur is our most sacred Day of Atonement, one whose life may be endangered by fasting is forbidden to do so. In such a case, one obtains atonement even without fasting.

In all cases of sickness or injury, we rely upon the opinion of a physician. As soon as he says that there is even a question of danger, religious law may be violated to preserve life, even if it is not certain that a given cure will help.

In any case where there is disagreement between medical authorities, one should make the same decision that one would make if no religious prohibition were involved, since where any question of danger is concerned, all religious laws must be [largely] ignored.

If the patient himself feels that his life is in danger, his word must be taken against any number of physicians. Regarding such a case, it is written, "The heart knows its own bitterness" (Proverbs 14:10).
« Last Edit: September 26, 2010, 11:17:33 PM by muman613 »
You shall make yourself the Festival of Sukkoth for seven days, when you gather in [the produce] from your threshing floor and your vat.And you shall rejoice in your Festival-you, and your son, and your daughter, and your manservant, and your maidservant, and the Levite, and the stranger, and the orphan, and the widow, who are within your cities
Duet 16:13-14

Offline Rubystars

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #172 on: September 27, 2010, 12:36:34 AM »
One of the things that filled me with a lot of anger was when a while back I saw people questioning whether or not they should save a drowning non-Jew on Shabbat. Is this kind of haughty attitude common or was it just an abberation? I can't imagine someone watching another human being drowning and not doing something to help.

Offline angryChineseKahanist

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #173 on: September 27, 2010, 09:01:59 AM »

are supermarkets open on jewish holy days?
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Offline angryChineseKahanist

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Re: Ask MUMAN613! almost live!
« Reply #174 on: September 27, 2010, 09:05:52 AM »

I've asked about elevators in the past...

where does it say that jews are not allowed to use electricity on saturdays? or what does it say? or probably better what's equvalent to electricy since it wasn't available back then?

I'll just throw that at you and hope that you'll know what i'm saying.



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